Cwm Prysor Viaduct

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Cwm Prysor Viaduct
Cwm Prysor Viaduct-geograph-4045756.jpg
Cwm Prysor Viaduct in 2014
Coordinates52°55′56″N 3°49′25″W / 52.9323°N 3.8235°W / 52.9323; -3.8235Coordinates: 52°55′56″N 3°49′25″W / 52.9323°N 3.8235°W / 52.9323; -3.8235
CarriesEx-Bala and Festiniog Railway
CrossesAfon Prysor
LocaleCwm Prysor, east of Trawsfynydd, Gwynedd, Wales
Official nameCwm Prysor Viaduct
Characteristics
Design9 36 feet (11 m) brick arches on stone piers[1][2]
Total length490 feet (150 m)
WidthSingle Standard Gauge Rail
Height105 feet (32 m)[3]
History
Opened1 November 1882[4]
Closed28 January 1961[5]
Statistics
Daily trafficFootpath

Cwm Prysor Viaduct, which is occasionally referred to as Blaen-y-Cwm Viaduct, is a former railway structure which crosses the Afon Prysor in thinly populated uplands east of Trawsfynydd, Gwynedd, Wales.[6][7]

History[edit]

The viaduct was the most substantial single structure on the line. It is sharply curved, necessitating the provision of a check rail in its active railway days.[8][9] In 1953 extensive repair work was undertaken in which the opportunity was taken to raise the parapet and add metal railings on top.[10][11]

The structure consisted of nine stone arches carrying a single bi-directional track over which passenger trains ran between Bala Junction and Blaenau Ffestiniog from 1882 to 1960, with freight trains lasting a year longer. A "Last Train" special crossed the viaduct a week before final closure.[12][13] The track was lifted in the 1960s. The prospect of rail traffic returning over the viaduct is very remote, not least because part of the route has been flooded by the construction of a dam at Llyn Celyn.

The viaduct is the location of a spectacular suicide in episode 8 of the 2018 S4C drama Hidden (Craith).

Modern access[edit]

The structure is Grade II Listed. [14]In 2015 the public had a Permissive Right of Access to the viaduct, but no right of way.[15] It is included in widely publicised walks.[16][17][18]

Gallery[edit]

  • "Cwm Prysor Viaduct". Geotopoi.
  • "Cwm Prysor Viaduct". flickr.
  • "Cwm Prysor Viaduct". flickr.
  • "Cwm Prysor Viaduct". geotopoi.
  • "Cwm Prysor Viaduct". Treasure Maps.
  • "Cwm Prysor Viaduct". Geograph.
  • "The viaduct on 22 January 1961". Harold Bowtell.
  • "The viaduct and line in BR days". RM Web.
  • "The viaduct and line in BR days". Forgotten Relics.
  • "The viaduct and line in BR days". Penmorfa.

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

Further material[edit]

  • Ferris, Tom (2004) [1961]. British Railways Volume 4 - Bewdley To Blaenau (DVD). demanddvd. DEMDVD084.
  • Turner, Alun (2003). Gwynedd's Lost Railways. Catrine: Stenlake Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84033-259-9.

External links[edit]