Cyborg art

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Cyborg art, also known as cyborgism,[1] is an art movement that began in the mid-2000s in Britain.[2] It is based on the creation and addition of new senses to the body via cybernetic implants[3] and the creation of art works through new senses.[4] Cyborg artworks are created by cyborg artists;[5] artists whose senses have been voluntarily enhanced through cybernetic implants.[6] Among the early artists shaping the cyborg art movement are Neil Harbisson, whose antenna implant allows him to perceive ultraviolet and infrared colours,[7] and Moon Ribas whose implants in her elbows [8] allow her to feel earthquakes and moonquakes.[9] Other cyborg artists include Manel Muñoz, a Catalan photographer who developed and installed a barometric system in his ears that allows him to perceive atmospheric pressure changes.[10]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Barbato, Massimo (2016-01-19). "The Art of Cybernetic Union - SERIOUS WONDER". Serious Wonder. Retrieved 2016-01-19. 
  2. ^ Jeffries, Stuart "Neil Harbisson, the world's first cyborg artist", The Guardian, 5 May 2014
  3. ^ "I Don't Have Artificial Body Parts, I Have Artistic Body Parts". The Huffington Post. 2015-03-12. Retrieved 2016-01-19. 
  4. ^ Else, Liz "Cyborg makes art using seventh sense", The New Scientist, 29 June 2012
  5. ^ Alexander, Neta (2015-05-26). "They Dance the Body Electric: Cyborg Artists Land in Central Israel". Haaretz. Retrieved 2016-01-19. 
  6. ^ Lee, Jennifer "A Surgical Implant for Seeing Colors Through Sound", The New York Times, 2 July 2012
  7. ^ NBC, "Last Call with Carson Daly", 29 September 2014
  8. ^ Garcia, Gabriella "The woman who can feel every earthquake in the world", "Hopes&Fears", 17 de octubre 2015.
  9. ^ Davis, Sally. “Encounters with the Posthuman”, Nautilus, 29 April 2013.
  10. ^ Gabilondo, Pablo "El catalán que va a implantarse un barómetro para predecir el tiempo: "Quiero ser cíborg", El Confidencial, 13 August 2017