Cyclohexylbenzene

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Cyclohexylbenzene
Cyclohexylbenzene.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Cyclohexylbenzene
Other names
Phenylcyclohexane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.011.429 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 212-572-0
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C12H16/c1-3-7-11(8-4-1)12-9-5-2-6-10-12/h1,3-4,7-8,12H,2,5-6,9-10H2
    Key: IGARGHRYKHJQSM-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C1CCC(CC1)C2=CC=CC=C2
Properties
C12H16
Molar mass 160.260 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless liquid
Density 0.982 g/cm3
Melting point 7.3 °C (45.1 °F; 280.4 K)
Boiling point 240.1 °C (464.2 °F; 513.2 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS07: Exclamation markGHS08: Health hazardGHS09: Environmental hazard
Danger
H302, H304, H315, H319, H410
P264, P270, P273, P280, P301+P310, P301+P312, P302+P352, P305+P351+P338, P321, P330, P331, P332+P313, P337+P313, P362, P391, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Cyclohexylbenzene is the organic compound with the structural formula C6H5-C6H11. It is a derivative of benzene with a cyclohexyl substituent (C6H11). It is a colorless liquid.

Formation[edit]

Cyclohexylbenzene is produced by the acid-catalyzed alkylation of benzene with cyclohexene.[1][2]

It is also generated by the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene.[3]

Applications[edit]

A route to phenol analogous to the cumene process begins with cyclohexylbenzene, which is oxidized to a hydroperoxide, akin to the production of cumene hydroperoxide. Via the Hock rearrangement, cyclohexylbenzene hydroperoxide cleaves to give phenol and cyclohexanone. Cyclohexanone is an important precursor to some nylons.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Qiao, Kun; Yokoyama, Chiaki (2004). "Novel Acidic Ionic Liquids Catalytic Systems for Friedel–Crafts Alkylation of Aromatic Compounds with Alkenes". Chemistry Letters. 33 (4): 472–473. doi:10.1246/cl.2004.472.
  2. ^ B. B. Corson, V. N. Ipatieff (1939). "Cyclohexylbenzene". Organic Syntheses. 19: 36. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.019.0036.
  3. ^ Bai, Jin; Li, Xiang; Wang, Anjie; Prins, Roel; Wang, Yao (2012). "Hydrodesulfurization of Dibenzothiophene and its Hydrogenated Intermediates over Bulk MoP". Journal of Catalysis. 287: 161–169. doi:10.1016/j.jcat.2011.12.018.
  4. ^ Plotkin, Jeffrey S. (2016-03-21). "What's New in Phenol Production?". American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 2019-10-27. Retrieved 2018-01-02.