This is a good article. Follow the link for more information.

Cyclone Lin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Tropical Cyclone Lin
Category 2 tropical cyclone (Aus scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Cyclone Lin April 5 2009 0132 Z.jpg
Tropical Cyclone Lin
FormedApril 1, 2009
DissipatedApril 8, 2009
(Extratropical after April 6, 2009)
Highest winds10-minute sustained: 110 km/h (70 mph)
1-minute sustained: 100 km/h (65 mph)
Lowest pressure975 hPa (mbar); 28.79 inHg
FatalitiesNone reported
Damage$1,000 (2009 USD)
Areas affectedFiji, Tonga
Part of the 2008–09 South Pacific cyclone season

Tropical Cyclone Lin (RSMC Nadi designation: 14F, JTWC Designation: 15P) formed on March 31, 2009 as a tropical depression within a monsoon trough to the northwest of Fiji. Over the next few days, the depression moved towards the southeast through the Fijian archipelago until late on April 3, when the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center in Nadi reported that the depression had intensified into a category one cyclone, and named it Lin. The JTWC did not start issuing warnings on Lin until the next day as it was approaching its 10-minute peak windspeeds of 110 km/h (70 mph) and 1-minute peak windspeeds of 100 km/h (65 mph). Cyclone Lin then reached its peak windspeeds early on April 5 as it passed directly over Tonga. Later that day as it approached the edge of RSMC Nadi's area of responsibility Lin started to go through an extratropical transition with the JTWC issuing their last advisory on it. As it moved into MetService's area of responsibility the cyclone was declared extratropical, however, they continued to monitor the system until April 8.

In Tonga initial reports, suggested that only vegetation had been impacted. However, it was later reported that power lines had been knocked down by high winds and the heavy rains triggered minor flooding in Nuku'alofa. Power stations in Tongatapu were also forced to close to protect the system. No one was injured by the storm but there were reports of significant crop losses. The Tongan Meteorological Service also reported that about $2,000 2009 TOP, ($1,000 2009 USD) worth of damage had been done to property owned by the service.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

Towards the end of March 2009, a monsoon trough lied across the South Pacific, from the Solomon Islands to Fiji and the Southern Cook Islands.[1] Over the next few days, a number of weak lows developed within this monsoon trough and rapidly moved south-eastwards in response to a northwest steering flow.[2][3] One of these lows was classified as Tropical Disturbance 14F by the Fiji Meteorological Service (FMS), while it was located to the north of Fiji during April 1.[3][4] During the following day, the system moved south-eastwards and developed into a tropical depression, while a shallow tropical disturbance developed within the monsoon trough to the south of Futuna.[4][5] 14F subsquently absorbed this shallow tropical disturbance, as it struggled to consolidate and organise to the north of Fiji, under the influence of vertical wind shear.[4] During April 3, the FMS reported that 14F had developed into a Category 1 tropical cyclone on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale and named it Lin.[6] The United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center subsquently initated advisories on Lin and designated it as Tropical Cyclone 25P, while it was located about 382 km (235 mi) to the northwest of Nuku'alofa.[7] This was after atmospheric convection had developed over the systems low-level circulation centre and rapidly consolidated within favourable conditions.[7] During April 4, Lin intensified further within favourable conditions and was classified as a Category 2 tropical cyclone, as it moved southeastwards towards the Tongan island of Tongatapu.[4][8] During the next day, after Lin had passed directly over Tongatapu, the FMS reported that the system had peaked with estimated 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 110 km/h (70 mph), while the JTWC estimated 1-minute sustained wind speeds of 100 km/h (65 mph).[4][9] During that day the cyclone weakened and started to transition into an extratropical cyclone, as it interacted with drier air and vertical wind shear surrounding the system increased.[10] This prompted the JTWC to issue their final warning on the system, before New Zealand's MetService (NZMS) took over the primary warning responsibility of Lin from the FMS and declared it extratropical.[10][4] MetService continued to track Lin's extratropical remnants for a couple of days, before they were last noted near 35°S 163°W during April 8.[4][11]

Effects[edit]

Tropical Cyclone Lin impacted Fiji, Tonga, as well as Wallis and Futuna.

Late on April 2, RSMC Nadi reported that a tropical cyclone alert had been issued for Wallis and Futuna and for the whole of Tonga this came as the tropical depression was located about 500 km (310 mi) to the west of Nukualofa.[12][1] Early the next day RSMC Nadi reported that a tropical cyclone alert had been declared for Vanua Levu, the Lau Islands, Taveuni, as well as other nearby islands, while later that morning Wallis and Futuna were placed under a tropical cyclone warning.[13][14] Later that day RSMC Nadi reported that Northern Tonga had now been placed under a tropical cyclone warning, while the tropical cyclone alert for Vanua Levu and the cyclone warning for Wallis had been canceled.[1][15][16] Later that day as the depression had been relocated and had been named as Cyclone Lin, RSMC Nadi canceled the tropical cyclone alert for Taveuni, and other nearby islands as well as the tropical cyclone warning for Futuna. RSMC Nadi also reported at this time that a tropical cyclone gale warning had been declared for the Lau group and the whole of Tonga.[1][17][18] During the next morning the tropical cyclone warnings for the Lau group and the Niuas in Tonga were canceled, while the gale warnings for Tonga were upgraded to storm warnings.[1][19] Over the next 24 hours the remaining warnings for Tonga were gradually canceled, with the last warning being issued at 1100 UTC on April 5.[1]

On April 4, Lin passed directly over Tonga with winds up to 110 km/h (70 mph) and heavy rains. Initial reports of damage stated that only vegetation had been impacted.[20] However, later reports stated that power lines had been knocked down by high winds and the heavy rains triggered minor flooding in Nuku'alofa. Some houses lost their rain gutters from the storm.[21] Due to strong winds, officials were forced to shut down power stations in Tongatapu to protect the system. Most of the power lines in Tonga were either downed or damaged by the storm and numerous trees fell across the island. Several roads were also blocked by downed trees and billboards were broken.[22] No one was injured by the storm but there were reports of significant crop losses.[23]

The Tongan Meteorological Service reported that some of its property and equipment had been damaged. The property damage had an approximate value of about $2,000 (2009 TOP, $1,000 2009 USD). This included a Stevenson screen, office guttering, a HF radio antennae, signal processor, and satellite receiver.[1] They also reported that the National weather forecasting center in Fua’amotu had experienced power failure on April 4 at 1600 UTC; for this reason the center operated using a small portable generator until early the next day when they stopped issuing warnings as Lin was no longer a threat to Tonga. Power was eventually restored later that day.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Tropical Cyclone Lin" (PDF). Tonga Meteorological Service. April 9, 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 15, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  2. ^ Tropical Disturbance Summary March 31, 2009 21z (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. March 31, 2009. Archived from the original on April 1, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  3. ^ a b Tropical Disturbance Summary April 1, 2009 21z (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. April 1, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Tropical Cyclone Season Summary 2008-09 Season". Fiji Meteorological Service. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  5. ^ Tropical Disturbance Advisory April 3, 2009 00z (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. April 3, 2009. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  6. ^ Tropical Disturbance Advisory April 3, 2009 18z CCA (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. April 3, 2009. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  7. ^ a b Tropical Cyclone 25P (Lin) Warning 1 April 4, 2009 00z (Report). United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center. April 4, 2009. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  8. ^ Tropical Disturbance Advisory April 4, 2009 06z (Report). Fiji Meteorological Service. April 4, 2009. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  9. ^ "2009 Tropical Cyclone (Storm) LIN (2009092S15178)". International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Tropical Cyclone 25P (Lin) Warning 4 April 5, 2009 15z (Report). United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center. April 5, 2009. Archived from the original on April 5, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  11. ^ Gale warning 194 April 8, 2009 00z (Report). New Zealand MetService. April 8, 2009. Archived from the original on April 8, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  12. ^ Unattributed (April 2, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Wallis and Futuna number 1". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-30.
  13. ^ Unattributed (April 3, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Fiji and Rotuma 2009-04-03 00z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-30.
  14. ^ Unattributed (April 3, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Wallis and Futuna number 3". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-08.
  15. ^ Unattributed (April 3, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Fiji and Rotuma 2009-04-03 12z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-30.
  16. ^ Unattributed (April 3, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Wallis and Futuna 2009-04-03 12z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-30.
  17. ^ Unattributed (April 3, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Fiji and Rotuma 03-04-2009 21z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-09.
  18. ^ Unattributed (April 3, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Wallis and Futuna number 7". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-09.
  19. ^ Unattributed (April 4, 2009). "Special Weather Bulletin for Fiji and Rotuma 04-04-09 03z". Fiji Meteorological Service. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-10.
  20. ^ Unattributed (April 4, 2009). "Tonga takes a hit from Tropical Cyclone Lin". Radio Australia News. Archived from the original on April 5, 2009. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  21. ^ Vaimoana Tapaleao (April 5, 2009). "Cyclone blows in and out of Tonga". The New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on April 5, 2009. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  22. ^ Unattributed (2009-04-06). "Cyclone Lin leaves trail of broken power lines". Vava'u Press Ltd. Retrieved 2010-04-22.
  23. ^ George Levaka (2009-04-06). "Tonga cleans up after Tropical Cyclone Lin". Radio Australia News. Retrieved 2010-04-22.

External links[edit]