Cynthia Dunbar

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Cynthia Noland Dunbar
Republican National Committeewoman from Virginia
Assumed office
May 2016
Preceded by Kathy Hayden
Member of the Texas Board of Education from the 10th district
In office
January 2007 – January 2011
Preceded by Cynthia A. Thornton
Succeeded by Marsha Farney
Personal details
Born (1964-06-27) June 27, 1964 (age 54)
Osage Beach, Missouri, U.S.
Political party Republican
Residence Forest, Virginia
Alma mater University of Missouri (BS)
Regent University (JD)
Occupation Attorney, author

Cynthia Noland Dunbar (born June 27, 1964) is a Republican National Committee member for the U.S. state of Virginia who entered the 2018 race as a congressional candidate for the 6th Congressional District of Virginia. She was the state-co-chair for Ted Cruz in the 2016 presidential primary race and a Texas Board of Education member.

Life[edit]

Dunbar studied at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri.[1] In 1990, Dunbar graduated from Pat Robertson's Regent University School of Law.[2] During the 2009-2010 academic year, she commuted from her home in Texas to teach in the Liberty University School of Law, established by the late Jerry Falwell.[3]

Dunbar was divorced from attorney spouse, Glen Dunbar, in February 2008,[4] and, in 2014, she married again.[5] She is a former Assistant Professor of Law and Advisor to the Provost of Liberty University.[6]

Political career[edit]

While residing in Richmond and Sugar Land, in Fort Bend County—suburbs of Houston, Texas— Dunbar, a Republican, lawyer and author, served on the 15-member elected Texas State Board of Education. In 2006, Dunbar won the Republican nomination for the Texas State Board of Education for District 10. She polled 32,589 votes (64.3 percent) to intra-party rival Tony Dale's 18,114 (35.7 percent).[7] Dunbar claimed that voters responded to her call for teaching intelligent design in science classes, rather than only the theory of evolution.[8] In the general election that year, she defeated Libertarian Martin Thomen, a clerk, with 225,839 votes (70.38%) to 95,034 votes (29.62%).[9] She did not run for reelection in 2010 and her term hence ran from 2007 to January 2011.

In early 2008, Dunbar ran for the Republican nomination for the United States House of Representatives to represent Texas's 22nd congressional district, the district formerly held by Tom DeLay. She eventually withdrew and endorsed Shelley Sekula-Gibbs, who briefly held the seat,[10] now represented by Pete Olson.

In November 2017, Dunbar announced she would run for Congress in Virginia's 6th congressional district in 2018 for the seat being vacated by the retiring incumbent Bob Goodlatte.[11] She was endorsed by Congressman Ron Paul.[12]

Works[edit]

  • One Nation Under God: How the Left Is Trying to Erase What Made Us Great (HigherLife Development Services, 2008) ISBN 0-9793227-2-3

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cynthia Dunbar". intelius.com. Retrieved December 28, 2016. 
  2. ^ "About Me". cynthiadunbar.com. 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-24. 
  3. ^ Russell Shorto (2010-02-11). "How Christian Were the Founders?". The New York Times Magazine. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 2010-05-26. 
  4. ^ "Case No. 07-DCV-158999 IN THE MATTER OF THE MARRIAGE OF CYNTHIA DUNBAR AND GLEN DUNBAR AND IN THE INTEREST OF EMILY E. DUNBAR AND BRENNON E. DUNBAR, CHILDREN". Archived from the original on 2008-02-17. 
  5. ^ "SEEK TRUTH: Top 5 Lies Being Spread Against Dunbar". Dunbar for Congress. 9 April 2018. Archived from the original on 6 May 2018. Retrieved 6 May 2018. 
  6. ^ "About Cynthia Dunbar". Archived from the original on 2016-02-08. 
  7. ^ "Republican primary election returns". Texas Secretary of State. March 7, 2006. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Dunbar wins party's nomination". Dallas Morning News. Mar 8, 2006. Archived from the original on September 6, 2012. Retrieved 2009-04-24. 
  9. ^ "Republicans hang onto down-ballot state positions". Austin American-Statesman. Nov 8, 2006. Retrieved 2008-05-17. 
  10. ^ "Bitter battle brewing in District 22 race". KHOU-TV. March 25, 2008. Retrieved 2009-04-24. [dead link]
  11. ^ Cynthia Dunbar running for Goodlatte's seat in Congress (WHSV)
  12. ^ "Ron Paul endorses Dunbar for Congress". The News Virginian. 16 January 2018. Archived from the original on 17 January 2018. Retrieved 17 January 2018. 

External links[edit]