Cyprinodon nevadensis

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Cyprinodon nevadensis
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Cyprinodontiformes
Family: Cyprinodontidae
Genus: Cyprinodon
Species: C. nevadensis
Binomial name
Cyprinodon nevadensis
(C. H. Eigenmann & R. S. Eigenmann, 1889)
Subspecies

C. n. amargosae
C. n. calidae
C. n. mionectes
C. n. nevadensis
C. n. pectoralis
C. n. shoshone

Cyprinodon nevadensis is a species of pupfish in the genus Cyprinodon.[1] The species is also known as the Amargosa pupfish,[1] but that name may also refer to one subspecies, Cyprinodon nevadensis amargosae.[2] All six subspecies are or were endemic to very isolated locations in the Mojave Desert of California and Nevada.

Subspecies[edit]

Likely subspp. amargosae: taken May 2014 in Amargosa River Canyon, downstream from Tecopa Triangle and upstream from waterfalls above confluence with Willow Creek. The second fish from the left in the photograph is male, as indicated by the blue coloration, shown here particularly in his dorsal stripe

The book Relicts of a Beautiful Sea, written by Christopher Norment is an elegant and readable exploration of the history of, and present challenges, faced by this group of fish species.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Cyprinodon nevadensis". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. 
  2. ^ a b c d Moyle, Peter B.; Yoshiyame, Ronald M.; Williams, Jack E.; Wirkamanayake, Eric D. (June 1995). "Fish Species of Special Concern in California" (PDF). California Department of Fish and Game. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  3. ^ Levitt, Alan (18 November 1981). "TECOPA PUPFISH DECLARED EXTINCT--REMOVED FROM ENDANGERED LIST" (PDF). United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Retrieved 29 April 2011. 
  4. ^ "Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish". USFWS. Retrieved 29 April 2011. 
  5. ^ "Warm Springs pupfish". USFWS. Retrieved 29 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "Species Profile for Shoshone pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis shoshone)". USFWS. Retrieved 29 April 2011.