Cyrene (steamboat)

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Cyrene (steamboat) ca 1909.jpeg
Cyrene
History
Name: Cyrene
Owner: James M. Colman, John L. Anderson
Route: Lake Washington, Puget Sound
Builder: Matt Anderson
In service: 1891
Notes: Originally built as a yacht.[1]
General characteristics
Type: inland steamboat
Propulsion: propeller
Crew: 6 (captain, mate, deckhand, engineer, purser, fireman)
Notes: Rebuilt in 1909 to increase capacity (pilot house moved to upper deck).

Cyrene was a steamboat that operated initially on Puget Sound and later on Lake Washington from 1891 to about 1912. Cyrene and another similar vessel Xanthus were somewhat unusual in that they had clipper bows and were both originally built as yachts.

Construction and launching[edit]

Cyrene was built in Seattle in a boatyard on the site of Colman Dock. The vessel was commissioned as a yacht by James M. Colman, a prominent early Seattle businessman. Colman hoped that the building of the yacht would encourage employment in the shipyard. Matt Anderson superintended the construction of the vessel.[2]

Transfer to Lake Washington[edit]

Colman asked John L. Anderson, who was operating steamboats on Lake Washington, if he would purchase Cyrene. Anderson agreed, and brought the vessel to Lake Washington by way of the difficult Black River route, the only natural riverine access from Puget Sound to Lake Washington.[2] Anderson used the vessel on Lake Washington in the excursion business. In 1909, in anticipation of additional business trom visitors to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Anderson rebuilt Cyrene, increasing the passenger capacity and moving the wheelhouse to the upper deck.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Newell, Gordon R., ed., H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, at 4, Superior Publishing Co., Seattle, WA 1966
  2. ^ a b Kline, M.S., and Bayless, G.A. Ferryboats: A Legend on Puget Sound, Bayless Books, Seattle 1983 ISBN 0-914515-00-4, at pages 145-46.

External links[edit]