Cyril Morley Shelford

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Cyril Shelford
Member of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly
for Skeena
In office
December 11, 1975 – May 10, 1979
Preceded byHartley Douglas Dent
Succeeded byFrank Howard
Member of the British Columbia Legislative Assembly
for Omineca
In office
June 12, 1952 – August 30, 1972
Preceded byRobert Cecil Steele
Succeeded byDouglas Tynwald Kelly
Personal details
Born(1921-04-08)April 8, 1921
Southbank, British Columbia
DiedNovember 8, 2001(2001-11-08) (aged 80)
Victoria, British Columbia
Political partySocial Credit
Spouse(s)Barbara Cassidy (1948-2001)
OccupationRancher
Military service
Allegiance Canada
Service/branch Canadian Army
Unit1st Canadian Division
Battles/warsWorld War II

Cyril Morley Shelford (April 8, 1921 – November 8, 2001[1]) was a rancher, author and political figure in British Columbia. He represented Omineca from 1952 to 1972 and Skeena from 1975 to 1979 in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia as a Social Credit member.

He was born in Southbank, British Columbia, the son of Jack Shelford.[2][3] Shelford served as an anti-aircraft gunner during World War II. After the war, he married Barbara Cassidy.[4] Shelford was a member of the provincial cabinet, serving as Minister of Agriculture.[3] He was defeated when he ran for reelection to the assembly in 1972 and 1979.[5] He died in 2001.[3]

Shelford published a number of books:

  • From Snowshoes To Politics ISBN 0-920501-09-5
  • We Pioneered ISBN 0-920501-19-2
  • From War To Wilderness ISBN 1-55056-533-8
  • Think Wood!: The Forest Is An Open Book; All We Have To Do Is Read It ISBN 0-9697713-0-4[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Former cabinet minister passes away in Victoria
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ a b c "Shelford Hills". BC Geographical Names. Retrieved 2011-12-09.
  4. ^ a b "Cyril Shelford, Ootsa Lake". Hiway16 Magazine. November 14, 2003. Archived from the original on April 26, 2012. Retrieved 2011-12-09.
  5. ^ "Electoral History of British Columbia, 1871-1986" (PDF). Elections BC. Retrieved 2011-07-27.