Cystamine

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Not to be confused with cysteamine.
Cystamine
Skeletal formula of cystamine
Ball-and-stick model of the cystamine molecule
Names
IUPAC name
2,2'-Dithiobis(ethylamine)
Other names
2,2'-Dithiobisethanamine
2-Aminoethyl disulfide
Decarboxycystine
Identifiers
51-85-4 YesY
Abbreviations AED
ChEBI CHEBI:78757 N
ChEMBL ChEMBL61350 YesY
ChemSpider 2812 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem 2915
UNII R110LV8L02 YesY
Properties
C4H12N2S2
Molar mass 152.28 g/mol[1]
Appearance Viscous oil
Boiling point Decomposes
Miscible
Solubility in Ethanol Soluble[vague]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

Cystamine is an organic disulfide. It is formed when cystine is heated, the result of decarboxylation. Cystamine is an unstable liquid and is generally handled as the dihydrochloride salt, C4H12N2S2·2HCl, which is stable to 203-214 °C at which point it decomposes. Cystamine is toxic if swallowed or inhaled and potentially harmful by contact.

Uses[edit]

Cystamine dihydrochloride is a useful reagent to derivatize various polymer monoliths for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, as a crosslinking agent in the development of polymer hydrogels, and as a functional group in nanoparticles developed for siRNA and DNA delivery.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merck Index, 12th Edition, 2846.