Czech European Constitution referendum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
National referendums on the
European Constitutional Treaty (TCE)
(European Union) (2004)
Superseded by the
Treaty of Lisbon (2007)
Czech Republic Cancelled; never held
Denmark Cancelled; never held
France No (55%) (with 69% turnout)
Ireland Cancelled; never held
Luxembourg Yes (57%) (with 88% turnout)
Netherlands No (62%) (with 63% turnout)
Poland Cancelled; never held
Portugal Cancelled; never held
Spain Yes (77%) (with 42% turnout)
United Kingdom   Cancelled; never held
Parliamentary approvals

The Czech referendum on the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe was expected to take place in 2006 to decide whether the Czech Republic should ratify the proposed Constitution of the European Union. Following the rejection of the Constitution by voters in France and the Netherlands, the Czech government announced that the proposed referendum would not be held.

The Czech Social Democrats, Christian Democrats and Green Party are strongly in favour of European integration, and would campaign in support of the Constitution, but President Václav Klaus is an outspoken eurosceptic, and refused to sign the constitutional treaty in October 2004 (most countries, however, did not send their head of state to sign). Opposition Civic Democratic Party opposed the Constitution.[1] As in many if not most member states, apathy surrounds the Constitution in the Czech Republic, and most are unfamiliar with its contents.[citation needed] The referendum is expected to be legally binding on the government.

Referendum bill[edit]

On 9 March 2005, the Czech government approved a bill that would permit referendums to be called on fundamental issues relating to the country's internal and foreign policy, and be called by any of the following:

  • A petition containing at least half a million signatures of Czech citizens.
  • Two thirds of the members in either chamber of the bicameral Czech parliament.
  • The government itself.

It is as yet uncertain whether the bill will pass. The opposition Civic Democratic Party has objected to the idea of referendums becoming a usual part of the Czech political system, and has instead motioned its own bill on a one-off referendum on the European Constitution.

If both bills fail to gather enough support, then it's quite possible that no referendum will be held and the matter of the ratification will be decided by the Czech parliament instead (where supporters of constitution do not have sufficient number of votes to accept the constitution, as of middle of 2005).

Opinion Polling[edit]

Date Agency For Against
2–10 April 2007 STEM 40 57
24 March 2007 Open Europe 27% 49%
1–6 June 2005 STEM 48% 52%
2 June 2005 Factum Invenio 31.5% 33.7%
18–25 April 2005 CVVM 41% 33%
October - November 2004 TNS Opinion 63% 18%

References[edit]

  1. ^ "EU schvaluje ústavu, Česko rozdělila". iDNES.cz. 11 January 2005. Retrieved 14 March 2017. 

External links[edit]