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Czech Warmblood

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Czech Warmblood
Conservation status
Other namesCzech: Český Teplokrevník
Country of originCzech Republic
Usesport horse, principally show-jumping and dressage
Traits
Height
  • 165–175 cm[3]: 228 

The Czech Warmblood, Czech: Český Teplokrevník, is a modern Czech breed of warmblood sport horse.[2]

History

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The Czech Warmblood was selectively bred from the mid-twentieth century by cross-breeding local mares with stallions of various breeds; these may have included Oriental and Spanish horses, and others of the Furioso, the Hanoverian, the Oldenburger, the Thoroughbred and the Trakehner breeds.[4]: 459 [3]: 228 

It is the most numerous breed of horse in the Czech Republic.[3]: 228  In 2021 the population was reported as about 18000–20000; the conservation status of the breed was listed as 'not at risk'.[2]

Two other warmblood breeds of the area are at least partly assimilated into the Czech Warmblood population: the Moravian Warmblood or Moravský Teplokrevník; and the Kinsky or Kůň Kinský, formerly known as the Golden Horse of Bohemia. Separate stud-books for these were established in 2004 and 2005 respectively.[4]: 459 [5][6]

Characteristics

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The Czech Warmblood is a robust, powerful horse bred with strong bones. The breed has a strong neck on an elegant body, a broad, long back, and good hooves, though they are sometimes flat. The mane and tail are very thick.

The Czech Warmblood is a relatively long-lived, unpretentious and relentless horse. The breed is willing and teachable with a very good temperament. Most are black, chestnut, bay or dark bay.

The stud farm in Kladruby plays a major role in the breeding of the Czech Warmblood. In the pedigree book, many other breeds are mentioned, for example Thoroughbred, Selle Français, Arabian and Anglo-Arabian.

Use

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The horses are used principally in show-jumping and in dressage; they are also suitable for recreational riding.[3]: 228 

References

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  1. ^ Barbara Rischkowsky, Dafydd Pilling (editors) (2007). List of breeds documented in the Global Databank for Animal Genetic Resources, annex to The State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Rome: Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. ISBN 9789251057629. Archived 23 June 2020.
  2. ^ a b c Breed data sheet: Cesky teplokrevnik / Czechia (Horse). Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed March 2023.
  3. ^ a b c d Élise Rousseau, Yann Le Bris, Teresa Lavender Fagan (2017). Horses of the World. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 9780691167206.
  4. ^ a b Valerie Porter, Lawrence Alderson, Stephen J.G. Hall, D. Phillip Sponenberg (2016). Mason's World Encyclopedia of Livestock Breeds and Breeding (sixth edition). Wallingford: CABI. ISBN 9781780647944.
  5. ^ Breed data sheet: Kun Kinsky / Czechia (Horse). Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed March 2023.
  6. ^ Breed data sheet: Moravsky teplokrevnik / Czechia (Horse). Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed March 2023.