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Birth name Deric Michael Angelettie
Also known as Mad Rapper, The Madd Rapper, Papa Dot, D.O.P.
Born (1968-07-31) July 31, 1968 (age 47)[citation needed]
Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Genres Hip Hop, R&B
Occupation(s) record producer, songwriter, artist, manager, comedian, entrepreneur
Years active 1990–present
Labels Bad Boy, RCA, Arista, Crazy Cat, Columbia
Associated acts Notorious B.I.G., Sean Combs, Kanye West, Jay-Z, Mary J. Blige
Website http://www.madrapper.com

Deric Michael Angelettie (born July 31, 1968), better known by his stage name D-Dot (also known as Mad Rapper, The Madd Rapper, Papa Dot, and D.O.P.), is an American music producer, songwriter, artist, manager, and entrepreneur from Brooklyn, New York City. He is a three-time Grammy Nominee and NARAS Award winner for "Producer of The Year" in 1998.

He created the character, Mad Rapper (who made his debut on Notorious B.I.G.'s LP, Life After Death), and released an album, Tell 'Em Why U Madd, on his Crazy Cat Catalogue record label distributed by Columbia Records in 2000. The album featured up and coming rapper 50 Cent on the song "How To Rob" and also introduced a young producer/rapper, Kanye West, whom D-Dot also managed and mentored.

Personal life[edit]

Born and raised an only child in Brooklyn, New York in 1968 to an African-American father Eric Angelettie and a Puerto Rican mother Dr. Noemi Angelettie.

He is married to Lisa Angelettie and has four daughters, Alexis, Autumn, Ali and Ava.


While attending Howard University from 1986 to 1989, Angelettie and his friend Ron "Amen-Ra" Lawrence formed the conscious rap duo Two Kings in a Cipher. In 1990, the duo signed a recording deal to Bahia/RCA Records. In 1991, they released their debut album From Pyramids to Projects.

D-Dot joined Bad Boy Entertainment in 1993 and was director of management and merchandising. D-Dot also managed Mary J. Blige from 1994 to 1996.

From 1996 to 1998, he was the "Captain" of Sean "Diddy" Combs' producing team: The Hitmen. As a producer, D-Dot produced and wrote multi-platinum songs for legendary artists such as Jay-Z, Mary J. Blige, Eminem, 50 Cent among many others. He produced and wrote mega hits such as Diddy's "It's All About The Benjamins". D-Dot has sold over 30 million records as a producer, songwriter and artist.

Bad Boy Entertainment[edit]

In 1993 Sean "Puffy" Combs left his post as V.P. of A&R for Uptown Records to start his own imprint, Bad Boy Entertainment. Angelettie joined Combs' team and help build his new label. In a 3-year span, Angelettie went from intern, to director of merchandising and management, to booking shows for artists Craig Mack and Notorious B.I.G., to managing R&B diva Mary J. Blige on her My Life Tour, to becoming the head of Bad Boy's A&R Department as Vice-President, and then finally in 1996 becoming the "captain" of The Hitmen — Bad Boy's inhouse production team.

In 1997, Angelettie produced multi-platinum albums for The Notorious B.I.G. (Life After Death, 1997), Puff Daddy (No Way Out, 1997) Mase (Harlem World, 1997) Faith Evans (Keep the Faith, 1998) and The Lox (Money, Power & Respect, 1998). In 1998, Angelettie executive produced the multi-platinum debut album for artist Black Rob, Life Story, which spawned the major radio hit "Whoa!". In 2004, Angelettie executive produced Bad Boy's new group: Da Band and was featured on MTV's reality show Making The Band 1 & 2 and in 2005 executive produced Black Rob's second LP, The Black Rob Report.

As a producer, Angelettie's credits also include songs for artists: Jay-Z, 50 Cent, Mary J. Blige, Lil' Kim, Nas and Nicki Minaj and has managed other artists such as Kanye West.

The Madd Rapper[edit]

The Mad Rapper made his debut on a skit on The Notorious B.I.G.'s second LP (Life After Death) in 1997. Angelettie's alter ego released his debut album, Tell 'Em Why U Madd, on his own Crazy Cat Catalogue Label in 2000. The album featured guest appearances from Puff Daddy, Eminem, Busta Rhymes, Raekwon, Jermaine Dupri, Lil' Cease. The album also introduced a young rapper by the name of 50 Cent and a producer by the name of Kanye West.

On November 19, 1998, Angelettie was charged with participating in the assault of Blaze Magazine editor Jesse Washington. Washington claimed that the assault was made because he published a photograph (taken with Angelettie's consent) that revealed The Madd Rapper's identity, which up until that time had been concealed from the general public but widely known in the music industry. The editor and Angelettie settled out of court.

Production Discography[edit]






  1. ^ Emi (May 8, 2014). "DJ Kay Slay – The Last Hip Hop Disciple". Hear That First. Retrieved May 10, 2014. 

External links[edit]