List of The Batman characters

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The following is a list of characters that have appeared in the television series The Batman, which ran from September 11, 2004 to March 22, 2008.

Main character[edit]

Character Actor Description Appearances
Batman / Bruce Wayne Rino Romano The character is based on the comic book character of the same name and follows the same premise and origin, in which his parents are murdered in front of him at a young age and swears vengeance on criminals. The show follows Batman having recently started his career as a masked vigilante.

Supporting characters[edit]

Character Actor Description Appearances
Batgirl / Barbara Gordon
The character is based on the Barbara Gordon version of Batgirl from the comic books. Her origin in the two-part "Batgirl Begins" deviates slightly from the comics in her acting as Batman's sidekick prior to the introduction of Robin and being younger when starting than in the comics. "Artifacts" included sections set in the year 2027 with the character appearing as "Oracle" based on the current role Barbara Gordon fills in the comics. Majority of the episode from season three through five.
Detective Ethan Bennett / Clayface Steve Harris Bennett was created specifically for the series as one of three recurring police officers to interact with Batman. He is a supporter of the Batman and is Bruce Wayne's old friend within the Gotham City Police Department. At the end of the first season, fumes from the Joker's "Joker Putty" gives him the ability to reshape himself like clay. Taking the name Clayface, he becomes an outlaw. He remains Clayface until Season Four when he is cured.

While Bennett is not based on any of the comic-book Clayface characters, the ability he gains is that of the Silver Age version, Matt Hagen.

Commissioner James Gordon Mitch Pileggi Based on the comic book character of the same name, he serves a similar function here as Batman's contact within the Gotham City Police Department. Unlike in the comics, the character is a later cast addition rather than a character from the beginning. According to producer Jeff Matsuda, Gordon is the young officer seen in the flashback in the episode "Traction".[citation needed]
Robin / Nightwing / Dick Grayson
Based on the Dick Grayson version of Robin from the comic books, he also borrows elements from the Tim Drake version, such as costume design and computer aptitude. His origin in "A Matter of Family" follows Grayson's from the comic books with the exception of his being Batman's second sidekick but his first official sidekick. "Artifacts" included sections set in the year 2027 with the character appearing as Nightwing, based on the superhero the comic-book character as an adult. Majority of the episode from season four and five.
Chief Angel Rojas
Rojas was created specifically for the show as one of three recurring police officers to interact with Batman. He is the head of the precinct where Yin and Bennett work and most of the episodes are set. He believes the Batman is the worst aspect of the criminal element and makes capturing him a priority. Majority of the episode from season one and two.
Alfred Pennyworth Alastair Duncan Based on the comic book character of the same name, he serves the same function as Wayne's butler, aide-de-camp, and surrogate parent.
Detective Ellen Yin Ming-Na Yin was created specifically for the show as one of three recurring police officers to interact with Batman. She is a new transfer to the Gotham City Police Department who does things by the book. She initially had oppositions about the Batman and aspires to capture and unmask him. Despite Batman saving her life a few times, she remains antagonistic. However over the course of the show, she begins to have a grudging respect for Batman and eventually becomes his ally. Majority of the episodes from season one and two. Her character design is based on Elisa Maza from Gargoyles.

Antagonists[edit]

Various villains who have appeared on The Batman. From left to right are: Riddler, Bane, Poison Ivy, a Riddleman, Black Mask, Man-Bat, Mister Freeze, Temblor, Spellbinder, Firefly, Ragdoll, Killer Croc, Joker, Harley Quinn (visible behind the Joker), Henchman, Penguin, Kabuki Twins, and Cluemaster as seen in Rumors.
Section contents
Character Actor Description Appearances
Bane
The character is based on the comic book character of the same name but a definitive origin is not given within the series. "Traction" introduces him as a "problem solver" who uses a South American poison to enhance his strength to super-human levels.
Black Mask James Remar The character is based on the comic book character of the same name though an exact origin or alter ego is not given in the series. He is presented as the meticulous and ruthless head of a criminal organization which he runs through a lieutenant known as "Number One".
Blaze Rachael MacFarlane The character of Doctor Jane Blazedale was created for a one episode story in the series. She is a nuclear physicist who is fired conducting unsafe experiments. She partners with Firefly and takes the name "Blaze". "White Heat"
Catwoman / Selina Kyle Gina Gershon The character is based on the comic book character the same name but no origin is provided within the series. She is presented as an experienced professional cat-burglar when first introduced in the series.
Clayface / Ethan Bennett This character is covered under "Recurring supporting characters".
Clayface II / Basil Karlo
The character is based in part on the Golden Age Clayface as an actor seeking vengeance on his critics. Within the series, he steals a Waynetech "Clayface-formula", created in an attempt to cure Ethan Bennett in an effort to gain "the right look" to get work.
Cluemaster
The character borrows some elements of the comic book character of the same name including the alter ego of Arthur Brown and the rough costume design. But where the source character is a failed game show host turned criminal, within the context of this series he is a former contestant of the children's game show Think, Thank, Thunk who seeks revenge on those he believes rigged the show and cost him his title as champion. "Q&A"
Count Vertigo Greg Ellis The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. In the show, Werner Vertigo is a former employee of Queen Industries who uses an eyepiece to induce vertigo. He is also responsible for stranding Oliver Queen on a deserted island prior to Queen becoming Green Arrow. "Vertigo"
D.A.V.E. Jeff Bennett The character of D.A.V.E, standing for Digitally Advanced Villain Emulator, was created specifically for the show. It is an A.I. created by Hugo Strange and programed with the personalities of several of the Batman's adversaries. Due to this combination of insane intellects, D.A.V.E. believed himself to be a human criminal whose brain was trapped in a digital prison, which he escaped. He then accessed a technology company computer and created a robotic body for himself, stealing a lab coat from one of the scientists working there. By stealing financial data he was able to determine Batman's secret identity and invaded the Batcave, but was defeated when Batman revealed to him that he was an artificial lifeform. "Gotham's Ultimate Criminal Mastermind"
Dracula Peter Stormare The character is based on the traditional character of the same name, adapted only for the direct-to-DVD animated movie. Dracula's corpse was sent from Transylvania to Gotham City after he was staked. Penguin accidentally revives him when blood from a cut falls on Dracula's heart. He began feeding on the people of Gotham, turning them into his Lost One minions that caused the Batman to be blamed. Posing as cultural anthropologist Dr. Alucard, Dracula attempted to seduce Vicky Vale in order use her soul to revive his emoliated bride Carmela Karnstein. However, Batman managed to find a cure from all of the Lost Ones, returning them to humans. Dracula was reduced to dust after Batman tricked him into facing a device that stores sunlight. The Batman vs. Dracula
Everywhere Man Brandon Routh The character of John Marlowe was created specifically for the show. He is presented as a peer and friend of Bruce Wayne, an art collector, and a scientist specializing in quantum physics. He creates a device called the "Quantex" which can duplicate matter. Using the device he creates a duplicate of himself. The duplicate has a slightly darker personality and eventually locks the original up, take his place, and begins using other duplicates to stage a series of art thefts. "The Everywhere Man"
Firefly Jason Marsden The character is based on the comic book character of the same name, specifically the version used after 1986. Garfield Lynns is presented as an arsonist-for-hire without a back story or origin for his equipment. The last appearance of the character in the series, "White Heat", has him attempting to steal an isotope of phosphorus to power his flight pack. When accidentally exposed to the isotope, he is converted in to living phosphorus.
Gearhead Will Friedle The character is based on the comic book character of the same name though no actual origin or alter ego is given for the character in the show. Gearhead is presented as a simple crook who can hijack and control vehicles through cybernetic implants in his arms. "RPM"
Mercy Graves Gwendoline Yeo The character is based on the character of the same name from Superman: The Animated Series and serves the same role as Lex Luthor's bodyguard. "The Batman/Superman Story"
Francis Grey Dave Foley The character of Francis Grey was created specifically for the show; however, he may have been based off the Clock King. He is presented as failed clock maker and thief. While in prison he develops the ability to rewind time, due his increasing desire for a do-over. His crime was actually petty by stealing a pocketwatch, but he accidentally set off a chain of events that lead to deaths; he got the blame for purely circumstantial evidence. Come New Years Eve a decade later, Batman and Batgirl attempt to stop him by bringing Grey's son to him; however, the poison he planned to detonate went off regardless. The grief allowed him to rewind all the way back to his original crime; he decided against it, resulting in a new present day where he and his son are fixing clocks together.
Harley Quinn Hynden Walch The character is based on the character of the same name from Batman: The Animated Series. Harleen Quinzel is presented as a talk-show psychiatrist who is initially looking to secure her television talk show. The Joker, being a fan of her show since "the girl's more screw-loose than [him]", decided to take her on a night on the town to help her get over being fired for trying to humiliate Bruce Wayne on television. When Harley sought revenge, Joker helped but fled when the Dark Knight saved the folks. He left a message for Harley, ensuring she still say him as a friend. She later gets stuck between two versions of the Joker thanks to a computer mishap that allowed a copy of his mind to control nano-technology.
The Joining The Joining was created specifically for the show. It is presented as an extraterrestrial technology based collective entity intent on absorbing Earth. They allied with Hugo Strange to remove the heroes in exchange for granting him the ultimate knowledge of the universe, which overloaded his mind and left him a vegetable.
The Joker Kevin Michael Richardson The character is based on the comic book character of the same name but no full origin is provided within the series. However, his origin was alluded to three times. The first was in "The Rubber Face of Comedy" where when his conversation with Det. Bennett, he remember falling into the chemical bath. The second, in "Strange Mind", Dr. Strange and Batman travel into the mind of the Joker to find the Joker before his accident as a low-level office worker who once dreamed of "making people laugh". And finally in "The Apprentice", where he was planning to make his sidekick into Joker by pushing him into the chemical bath. Joker is shown as a chronic resident of Arkham Asylum who commits elaborate crimes when free. He views these as "jokes" at the expense of Batman, the police, or the city in general. His original outfit is based of a straitjacket, but he later adapts the traditional purple suit and playing card gimmick.
Joker 2.0 Kevin Michael Richardson Joker 2.0 is a variation of Joker created for a single episode of the series. The character is an artificial intelligence based on Joker's personality. "The Metal Face of Comedy"
Kabuki Twins None, the characters are silent. The Kabuki Twins were created specifically for the series as recurring henchwomen for Penguin. They are presented as silent followers Penguin had acquired on a trip to Asia but an exact origin or alter egos is never given in the show.
Hideto Katsu Keone Young The character of Hideto Katsu was created specifically for the show as the head of an Oriental criminal organization and a former victim of Catwoman. "The Cat and the Bat"
Killer Croc Ron Perlman The character is based on the comic book character of the same name, but an origin is never provided for him in the series. Croc has a Cajin accent, and even has a tail. He rarely makes a move on his own, tending to work with other villains.
Killer Moth Jeff Bennett The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. No initial origin is provided for him and he is presented as Penguin's gofer. Within the episode he is transformed from a villain "wannabe" to a monstrous moth creature. He remained loyal to Penguin, even using his new form to intimidate the other villains into obeying. "Team Penguin"
Lex Luthor Clancy Brown The character is based on the comic book character of the same name and is presented as a business magnate with immense wealth. Within the episodes, he attempts to gain permanent control over Superman using spores from Poison Ivy laced with kryptonite. "The Batman/Superman Story"
Man-Bat Peter MacNicol The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Obsessed with The Batman, Doctor Kirk Langstrom creates a serum that turns him into a giant bat. In show, he remains in Arkham until he finally gets over the obsession of wanting to be feared like the Batman. He is later called upon by Batman to make an antidote to his serum, which college students were using to get revenge on bullies and the like.
Marty Patton Oswalt Marty was created specifically for the series as Joker's computer tech henchmen. He is also indirectly responsible for the creation of Joker 2.0 "The Metal Face of Comedy"
Metallo Lex Lang The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. While what is mentioned of his origin is similar to the comics, he is presented as muscle-for-hire on Luthor's payroll. "The Batman/Superman Story, Part One"
Mirror Master John Larroquette The character is based on the comic book character of the same name, sharing the rough origin, alter ego of Samuel Scudder, and long standing conflict with Flash.
Mister Freeze Clancy Brown The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Though he shares the alter ego of Victor Fries, his origin and background are unique to the series. He is presented as a professional diamond thief when he first encounters Batman, who accidentally becomes trapped in a cryonic freezer. Instead of being killed, the accident drastically lowers his body temperature and grants him the ability to freeze things at a touch.

In the future, Freeze loses his legs to his condition and requires mechanical replacements. He freezes himself to awaken 100 years into the future, where they would be no Batman. However, Batman left information on how to defeat his foes in the Bat-puter, allowing the GCPD of the time to scare Freeze into submission.

Number One
Number One was created specifically for the series as the head henchmen for Black Mask. The role has rotated during Black Mask's appearances.
The Penguin Tom Kenny The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Oswald Cobblepot is presented as a peer of Bruce Wayne, the last of one of Gotham City's wealthiest families. He is also the epitome of his family: arrogant, rude, selfish, decedent, and pretentious with the Cobblepot fortunes having been squandered away years ago.
Poison Ivy Piera Coppola The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Pamela Isley is introduced as a school friend of the teenage Barbara Gordon and a passionate eco-rights activist. When her plan to use the freelance criminal Temblor goes bad, she is exposed to a powerful plant growth accelerator compound. This changes her, giving her the ability to produce mind controlling spores and to rapidly grow and control plants.
Prank Michael Reisz Prank was created specifically for the show as a "sidekick" for Joker. "The Apprentice"
Punch and Judy None, the characters are silent. Punch and Judy were created specifically for the series as Joker's oversized henchmen.
Ragdoll Jeff Bennett The character is based on the comic book character of the same name though with a very different costume. He is triple jointed, allowing him easy access to areas too difficult to move in by normal people; he can even hide in Penguin's hat.
Rhino and Mugsy John DiMaggio The characters are based on the characters of the same names from Batman: The Animated Series and fil the same role as Ventriloquist's henchmen.
Riddlemen The Riddlemen were created specifically for the series as a group of henchmen for Riddler.
The Riddler Robert Englund The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Within the series, Edward Nigma is a university scientist working on methods to enhance human memory. When his breakthrough prototype is sabotaged on its demonstration for investors, he is fired from the university and seeks revenge on the person he believes responsible for the sabotage. Thwarted by Batman, he creates the identity of Riddler and starts a life of crime. He is given a sympathy episode, when the one closest to him was revealed to be the one who sabotaged the demonstration.
Rumor Ron Perlman Rumor was created specifically for the series. Real name, Mario. Mario is the bodyguard of a scientist and businessman, Paul Karon, who was crippled by the Joker. In order to remove his failure, he decides to kill all of Gotham City's costumed criminals. Though he could have been left to the criminals by Batman and Robin, they decided against letting an act of karma take placed, getting everyone arrested. "Rumors"
Scorn Daryl Sabara Scorn was created specifically for the series to provide Wrath with a sidekick counterpart to Robin. Andy Mallory is the younger son of a pair of jewel thieves who were arrested and jailed around the same time Bruce Wayne's parents were killed. "The End of the Batman"
Shadow Thief Diedrich Bader The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. "What Goes Up..."
Sinestro Miguel Ferrer The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. "Ring Toss"
Smoke Amanda Anka Smoke was created specifically for the series as a henchman for Mirror Master. "A Mirror Darkly"
Solomon Grundy Kevin Grevioux The character is based on the comic book character of the same name including his origin which is presented as an "urban legend" in the series. "Grundy's Night"
Spellbinder Michael Massee The character is based on the comic book character of the same name using the name and the basic motif of using visual illusions. In the series, he is a mystic who has achieved the power of the "third eye". this allows him to project visual and auditory illusion as well as imbedding posthypnotic commands. "The Butler Did It"
Hugo Strange
The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Hugo Strange is presented as the head psychiatrist of Arkham Asylum who is more interested in discovering how the criminal mind works than in actually helping to cure the inmates.
Temblor Jim Cummings Temblor was created specifically for the series as a mercenary Pamela Isley hired to destroy a chemical processing plant. He uses specifically designed armored gauntlets to generate shock-waves. "Batgirl Begins, Part One"
Terrible Trio
The Trio consists of Fox, Shark, and Vulture, characters that are based on the comic book characters of the same name, but retain only the names in common. The trio are presented as university students named David, Justin, and Amber who have gained access to Kirk Langstrom's formula. They use it to take on aspects of their namesakes to terrorize the university. "Attack of the Terrible Trio"
Rupert Thorne Victor Brandt The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. "The Bat in the Belfry"
Toymaker Patton Oswalt Toymaker was created specifically for the series. Cosmo Krank is the C.E.O. of Krank Co., a company that produces incredibly futuristic but dangerous toys. When Bruce Wayne leads a campaign for safe toys and eventually closes Krank Co. down, Krank creates the identity of Toymaker to get revenge using toys of his own design. "Cash for Toys"
Toyman Richard Green The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. "Lost Heroes, Part One"
Ventriloquist Dan Castellaneta The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. Wesker was once a simple puppeteer, but after failing in the profession, his psyche split off; this caused him to believe that his puppet, Scarface was ordering him around. Because of this, he became a crime boss and began robbing Gotham. In overview, Wesker is perfectly normal so long as the Scarface puppet is nowhere near him.
Wrath Christopher Gorham The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. William Mallory is the older son of a pair of jewel thieves who were arrested and jailed around the same time Bruce Wayne's parents were killed. "The End of the Batman"
Maxie Zeus Phil LaMarr The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. He is presented as an eccentric billionaire taking revenge on Gotham City for not electing him mayor. "Thunder"
Tony Zucco Mark Hamill The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. A former circus performer, Zucco sought to extort money from the Grayson's circus and causes the deaths of Robin's parents. Zucco had accidentally killed his own father during a routine knife-throwing act. "A Matter of Family"

Additional characters[edit]

Character Actor Description Appearances
Flash Charlie Schlatter The character is based on the Silver Age and later versions of the character form the comic books but no origin or clear identification of which version is provided in the episodes. In an interview, Alan Burnett said that he sees the character as the Barry Allen version, though scripts left it up to the viewer.[citation needed]
Mayor Marion Grange Adam West Mayor Marion Grange borrows the name of one of the mayors of Gotham City from the comic books, but was created specifically for the series. Adam West played Batman in the live-action 1960s TV series.

" Majority of the episodes from season one to four

Green Arrow Chris Hardwick The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. What is related of his origin in the show is close to the one from the comic books, varying only by including Count Vertigo as the person who causes him to be stranded on a deserted island.
Green Lantern Dermot Mulroney The character is based on the Hal Jordan version of Green Lantern from the comic books. Within the show, his origin is mentioned and parallels the one from the comic books, including the existence of the Green Lantern Corps.
Hawkman Robert Patrick The character is based on the Katar Hol version of Hawkman from the comic books. What is mentioned of his origins, a police officer from the planet Thanagar, matches the Silver Age origin of the character.
Martian Manhunter Dorian Harewood The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. His origin differs from the one presented in the comics. In the show he comes to Earth voluntarily to warn against the coming of the Joining.
Superman George Newbern The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. While no origin is provided in the episodes, he is presented in the same characterization as the comic book character. This includes the alter ego of Clark Kent, reporter for the Daily Planet.
Detective Cash Tankinson Patrick Warburton Cash Tankinson was created for the series as a co-worker of Ellen Yin.
Vicki Vale Tara Strong The character is based on the comic book character of the same name. The Batman vs. Dracula

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