List of state Green Parties in the United States

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The Green Party of the United States has affiliated state parties in most states. This list aims to include all state Green Parties. It links to articles on the state parties where they exist.


Alabama[edit]

Alabama Green Party
Chairman Tyler Henderson[1]
Social Media Coordinator Myriah King-Rao
Ideology Green politics
Website
Official website

The Green Party of Alabama[2] is a state-level political party in the United States. They subscribe to the 10 key values of the US Green Party. Their nominated candidate for President in 2016 was Dr. Jill Stein.[3]

Alaska[edit]

Arizona[edit]

Arkansas[edit]

California[edit]

Colorado[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

Delaware[edit]

District of Columbia[edit]

Florida[edit]

Georgia[edit]

The Georgia Green Party[4] is a state-level political party in Georgia. Their candidate for President in 2016 was Dr. Jill Stein.[5] Stein was denied access to the ballot. The party sued and won at the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.[6]

External links[edit]

Hawaii[edit]

Idaho[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Indiana[edit]

The Indiana Green Party[7] is a state-level political party in Indiana. They affiliated with the Green Party of the United States in 2002.[8]

Iowa[edit]

Kansas[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Louisiana[edit]

Maine[edit]

Maryland[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

Mississippi[edit]

Missouri[edit]

The Missouri Green Party[9] is a state-level political party in Missouri. In 2016, Dr. Jill Stein was their candidate for President.[10] 2016 was also the first time they got on the ballot in 16 years.[11] Due to the party's candidate for Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Leach getting 2.4% of the vote, the party will remain on the ballot for at least 4 years.[12]

External links[edit]

Montana[edit]

Nebraska[edit]

The Nebraska Green Party is the state party organization for Nebraska of the Green Party of the United States.

The Nebraska Green Party is a small but swiftly growing party. The party held its first convention in August 2000 at a Unitarian church in Lincoln, Nebraska. In the 2004 election three Congressional candidates, Roy Guisinger, party Co-Chair Steve Larrick and Dante Salvatierra garnered a total of over 10,000 votes statewide. The party lost its ballot access after the 2004 general election. In order to maintain status as an officially recognized party in Nebraska, Green Party candidates must garner at least five percent of the vote in federal or state electoral races. In 2004, these offices were limited to President and the House of Representatives. This led to the Green Party being recognized in the 1st District but not in the 2nd District and 3rd District. Petition drives qualified the Greens in all three districts in 2006.

Nevada[edit]

The Green Party of Nevada[13][14] is a state-level political party in Nevada, United States. They subscribe to the 10 key values of the US Green Party. Dr. Jill Stein was the party's nominee for President in 2016.[15] The Nevada Green Party first qualified for ballot access in 1996, and lost it in 1998.[16] In 2014, the party sued the Nevada Secretary of State seeking to extend the deadline for petitions to get on the ballot, but the legislature extended the date and thus the party withdrew its suit.[17][18]

External links[edit]

New Hampshire[edit]

The Green Party of New Hampshire[19] is a state-level political party in New Hampshire. As of 2015, the party seems dormant.[20]

New Jersey[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

The Green Party of New Mexico is the state party organization for New Mexico of the Green Party of the United States. It is listed as a minor qualified political party in New Mexico.

New York[edit]

North Carolina[edit]

The North Carolina Green Party is a political party in the state of North Carolina, and the NC affiliate of the Green Party of the United States.[21] It does not currently hold ballot access but as of October 2015, it was gathering signatures to meet state requirements for party certification.

In 2016, the party came close to gaining statewide ballot access, closer than the other six new parties, but still fell short of getting the required amount of signatures.[22] The party, in collaboration with the Stein/Baraka presidential campaign, helped garner more write-in votes for Jill Stein than any presidential write-in candidate has ever received in North Carolina.[23]

North Dakota[edit]

The North Dakota Green Party[24] is a state-level political party in North Dakota. They are not affiliated with the Green Party of the US. Their nominated candidate for President in 2016 was Dr. Jill Stein.

Ohio[edit]

Oklahoma[edit]

Oregon[edit]

Pennsylvania[edit]

Rhode Island[edit]

The Green Party of Rhode Island (GPRI) is one of the oldest active Green parties in the United States. The party was founded on March 6, 1992, at a meeting of 40 activists from Rhode Island. In November 1996, GPRI was one of 12 founding parties in the Association of State Green Parties, renamed the Green Party of the United States in 2001. Several Rhode Island party leaders have served as officers of the national Green Party. The party's candidates run for municipal councils in several cities and towns, such as running for Mayor of Providence, the State Senate and the State House of Representatives, U.S. Congress, and for Lieutenant governor. The Green Party of Rhode Island has been involved in nationwide Green politics.

South Carolina[edit]

The South Carolina Green Party, also known as South Carolina's Progressive Reform Party according to its official website, is a ballot-qualified political party in the state of South Carolina. It is the state affiliate party of the Green Party of the United States.

South Dakota[edit]

The South Dakota Green Party[25] is a state-level political party in South Dakota. They are not affiliated with the Green Party of the US.

Tennessee[edit]

The Green Party of Tennessee is a state-level political party in Tennessee, formed in 2001. It is a member of the Green Party of the United States.

Texas[edit]

Utah[edit]

The Green Party of Utah[26] is a ballot-qualified political party in the state of Utah. It is the Utah affiliate of the Green Party of the United States[21]. Their candidate for President in 2012 was Dr Jill Stein.[27]

External links[edit]

Vermont[edit]

(Not affiliated with the Green Party of the US)

Virginia[edit]

Green Party of Virginia[edit]

The Green Party of Virginia (GPVA) is a state-level political party in Virginia and the state affiliate of the Green Party of the United States.

The GPVA's focuses on environmental issues and promoting candidates for local elections. The party had its first candidates running for elections in 1993, and got its first successful candidates elected to office in 1997.[28]

Independent Greens of Virginia[edit]

The Independent Greens of Virginia, (also known as the Indy Greens), was the state affiliate of the Independence Party of America in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It became a state party around 2003 when a faction of the Arlington local chapter of the Green Party of Virginia (GPVA) split from the main party. As of 2011, it bills itself as a "fiscally conservative, socially responsible green party", with an emphasis on rail transportation and "more candidates".[29] In support of wider ballot participation, it endorses many independent candidates who are not affiliated with the party.

Washington[edit]

West Virginia[edit]

Wisconsin[edit]

Wyoming[edit]

The Wyoming Green Party[30] is a state-level political party in Wyoming. Their 2016 candidate for President was Dr. Jill Stein.[31][32] 2016 was also the first time the Green Party had a candidate for President on the ballot in Wyoming.[33]

US Territories[edit]

The Green Party of the United States Virgin Islands[34] is a territorial-level political party in the United States Virgin Islands.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Taylor, Drew (November 6, 2016). "Alabama mirrors national trend with support for third parties". Tuscaloosa News. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  2. ^ "We're on the Ballot". Green Party of Alabama. Archived from the original on January 8, 2017. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  3. ^ Edgemon, Erin (October 1, 2016). "Jill Stein in Birmingham: A vote for Green Party isn't a vote for Trump". al.com. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  4. ^ Torres, Kristina; Aaron Gould Sheinin (August 16, 2016). "Green Party's Jill Stein nixed for Georgia's presidential ballot". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  5. ^ Darnell, Tim (August 18, 2016). "Georgia Green Party Barred From State Ballot, Considering Lawsuit". patch.com. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  6. ^ Torres, Kristina (February 1, 2016). "Court upholds ruling for third-party presidential hopefuls in Georgia". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  7. ^ Manski, Ben (May 5, 2003). "Green Party of the United States - National Committee Voting - Proposal Details". Green Party of the US. Archived from the original on January 8, 2017. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  8. ^ Sutter, Jeff (January 14, 2003). "Indiana Green Party Application for Accreditation by the Green Party of the U.S". Green Parties world wide. Archived from the original on February 15, 2017. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  9. ^ Friestad, Thomas (September 6, 2016). "Missouri Green Party sets sights high after earning ballot access". Missourian. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  10. ^ Mannies, Jo (September 9, 2016). "Missouri Green Party hopes Stein can clear its future ballot path". St. Louis Public Radio. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  11. ^ Sladek, Tommy (September 7, 2016). "Missouri Green Party makes ballot for the first time in 16 years". KRCG. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  12. ^ "MISSOURI GREEN PARTY BECOMES OFFICIAL". Gateway Green Alliance. November 22, 2016. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  13. ^ "Stein, Green Party submit petitions in Nevada to be on November ballot". Jill2016. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  14. ^ "By-laws of the Green Party of Nevada" (PDF). Carson City, Nevada: Nevada Secretary of State. August 1, 2005. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  15. ^ Stein, Jill. "Stein, Green Party submit petitions in Nevada to be on November ballot". Jill2016. Archived from the original on February 15, 2017. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  16. ^ "Ballot Status History: Green Party of Nevada". Green Party of the United States. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  17. ^ Dorsey, Jennifer A. (September 1, 2016). "NEV. GREEN PARTY V. CEGAVSKE". casetext. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  18. ^ "Nevada Green Party Files Lawsuit to Overturn April Petition Deadline for Newly-Qualifying Parties". Ballot Access News. April 18, 2014. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  19. ^ "New Hampshire Green Party revives party organization, website". Green Party Watch. January 17, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  20. ^ Johnson, Akilah (December 4, 2015). "An American campaigns for president in Paris". Boston Globe. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  21. ^ a b "State Parties". Green Party US. Retrieved 21 November 2016. 
  22. ^ Mountain Xpress, September 1, 2016 - Party crashers by Dan Hesse
  23. ^ Winger, Richard (6 December 2016). "Jill Stein Sets New Record for a Write-in Presidential Candidate in North Carolina". ballot-access.org. Ballot Access News. Retrieved 13 March 2017. 
  24. ^ Gunzburger, Ron. "Politics1 - Online Guide to North Dakota Politics". Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Politics1. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 
  25. ^ "Current list of established political parties in South Dakota". Ellsworth, Maine: MyTimeToVote. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  26. ^ White, Elizabeth (May 19, 2002). "13 Green Party candidates picked". Deseret News Utah. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  27. ^ Stein, Jill (August 15, 2012). "State of Utah 2012 Presidential Statement of Declaration" (PDF). Utah Lieutenant Governor Elections. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  28. ^ "Previous Electoral Campaigns". Green Party of Virginia. Retrieved 18 December 2015. 
  29. ^ "Policy Endorsements". Independent Greens of Virginia. September 1, 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2014. 
  30. ^ Hancock, Laura (May 23, 2016). "Wyoming Green Party attempts to get presidential hopeful Jill Stein on November ballot". Casper Star-Tribune. Retrieved January 8, 2017. 
  31. ^ "Wyoming Green Party petitions to put Jill Stein on ballot". The Washington Times. May 24, 2016. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  32. ^ Murphy, Matt (Aug 20, 2016). "Wyoming supporters want to get Jill Stein on the ballot". Wyoming Tribune Eagle. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  33. ^ Rosenfeld, Arno (September 8, 2016). "Green Party candidate to appear on Wyoming ballot; Trump rival fails to gather enough signatures". Billings Gazette. Retrieved 15 February 2017. 
  34. ^ "Referendums On Medical Marijuana And Hemp - US Virgin Islands". NORML. August 22, 2012. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 

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