DD-WRT

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DD-WRT
DDwrt.logo.png
Ddwrtv24rc7.png
DD-WRT's Web Interface
Developer(s) Sebastian Gottschall / NewMedia-NET
Initial release 22 January 2005 (2005-01-22)[1]
Stable release v24 SP1 (Build10020) / 27 July 2008 (2008-07-27)
Preview release v24 preSP2 / 12 October 2012 (2012-10-12)
Type Router operating system
License GNU General Public License[citation needed]
Website dd-wrt.com
DD-WRT was originally designed for routers like this Linksys WRT54GL, but now runs on a variety of routers.

DD-WRT is a Linux-based firmware for wireless routers and wireless access points. It is compatible with several models of routers and access points, for example, the Linksys WRT54G series (including the WRT54GL and WRT54GS). DD-WRT is one of the third-party firmwares, which are designed to replace the original firmware on some commercial routers. Alternative firmware may offer features and functionality sets that differ from the original firmware it is replacing.

The firmware project's name, DD-WRT, was taken in part from the Linksys WRT54G model router, a successful home router popular in 2002-2004, for which the first replacement firmware was written. "DD" are the German license plate letters for all cars from Dresden, where the "Brainslayers" development team lived. "WRT", also used by the OpenWRT router firmware project, is coming to be a generic acronym for "Wireless RouTer", which may have been Linksys's original meaning.

DD-WRT includes such features as support for the Kai network, daemon-based services, IPv6, Wireless Distribution System, RADIUS, advanced quality of service, radio output power control, overclocking capability, and software support for a Secure Digital card hardware modification.

Buffalo Technology and other companies have shipped routers pre-installed with a customized version of DD-WRT.[2][3]

Version history[edit]

The first DD-WRT version, released 2005-01-22,[4] was called 16 and was created as a branch of Sveasoft Alchemy, which in turn is based on the Linksys WRT54G firmware.

DD-WRT version 22, released 2005-07-25,[5] was the last version to use the Alchemy kernel.

DD-WRT version 23, released 2005-12-25,[6] was the first version to use the OpenWrt kernel instead of the Alchemy kernel.

DD-WRT version 23 Service Pack 1 was released on 16 May 2006. Much of the code was overhauled and rewritten during the development of this release, and many new features were added.

DD-WRT version 23 Service Pack 2 was released on 14 September 2006. The interface was overhauled, and some new features were added. Some additional router models are supported, with more planned.

DD-WRT version 24 was released on 18 May 2008. It allows up to 16 virtual interfaces with different SSIDs and encryption protocols. It can run on some PowerPC, IXP425-based router boards, Atheros WiSOC, and X86-based systems. It can also run to some extent on routers with low flash memory (ex. WRT54Gv8 or WRT54GSv7).

DD-WRT version 24 Service Pack 1 was released on 26 July 2008. It contains an urgent DNS security fix for an issue in dnsmasq, site survey security fixes, longer passwords, and flexible OpenVPN configurations. It can also run on additional hardware, including WRT300 v1.1, WRT310N, WRT600N, Tonze AP42X Pronghorn SBC, Ubiquiti LSX and Netgear, Belkin, and USR devices.

Features[edit]

List of features in all versions:[citation needed]

Micro
(2 MB)
Mini Nokaid Standard VOIP VPN* Mega**
(8 MB)
Access restrictions Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
AnchorFree Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Bandwidth monitoring Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
ChilliSpot Yes Yes Yes
Dynamic DNS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
HTTPS option for web management Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
IPv6*** Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
JFFS2* Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
XLink Kai (kaid) Yes Yes
MMC/SD card support Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
NoCat Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
OpenVPN Yes Yes
PPTP/PPTP Client Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Quality of service Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
IPv6 Router Advertisement Daemon (radvd) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Linking routers/repeater/mBSSID Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
RFlow (traffic information) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Samba/CIFS client Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Milkfish SIP router Yes Yes
SNMP Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
SPI firewall/IPtables Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
SSHd Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Telnetd Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Transmit (Tx) power adjustment **** Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
UPnP Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Wake-on-LAN Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
WPA/WPA2 personal/enterprise Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Wiviz Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
* Smaller VPN JFFS builds are available for 4MB units: downloads/others/eko.
** Only on DD-WRT v24 (8MB+ flash required).
*** IPv6-related features do not work by default in DD-WRT v24.[citation needed]
**** DD-WRT Wiki page warns about router damage if the user increases TX power more than the default, overheating the radio chipset.
Note: It is possible to build a custom firmware package with the
desired feature-set, working within the limitations of available ROM.[7]
 
ROM Requirements: • All versions require at least 4 MB of flash unless noted otherwise.
• Micro+ requires at least 2 MB of flash + 128K CFE.

Security issues[edit]

A remote command execution vulnerability in DD-WRT's HTTPd server was found by a Bulgarian hacker on 21 July 2009, and was patched within a few hours after being documented on milw0rm.[8] This problem was thereafter fixed in V24-preSP2 build 12533.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alchemy branch v16 by BrainSlayer". 22 January 2005. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Buffalo Partners with NewMedia-NET" (Press release). 23 October 2007. Retrieved 14 November 2007. 
  3. ^ Gottschall, Sebastian [BrainSlayer] (29 October 2007). "Congratulations on the partnership w/Buffalo!". Retrieved 14 November 2007. 
  4. ^ "Alchemy branch v16 by BrainSlayer". 22 January 2005. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  5. ^ "Index of /stable/dd-wrt.v22/". 25 July 2005. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  6. ^ "Index of /stable/dd-wrt.v23/". 25 December 2005. Retrieved 29 July 2012. 
  7. ^ Firmware Modification Kit gives the user the ability to make changes to a firmware image without recompiling the firmware sources.
  8. ^ "A friend of my pointed out to me a new dd-wrt exploit.". 20 July 2009. Retrieved 11 October 2013. 

External links[edit]