Diethylethanolamine

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Diethylethanolamine
Skeletal formula of diethylethanolamine
Names
IUPAC name
2-(Diethylamino)ethanol
Other names
  • Diethylaminoethanol
  • 2-Diethylaminoethanol
  • N,N-Diethyl-2-aminoethanol
  • N,N-Diethylethanolamine
  • Diethyl(2-hydroxyethyl)amine
  • (2-Hydroxyethyl)diethylamine
  • 2-Diethylaminoethyl alcohol
  • 2-Hydroxytriethylamine
Identifiers
100-37-8 YesY
741863
ChEBI CHEBI:52153 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL1183 YesY
ChemSpider 13842001 YesY
EC Number 202-845-2
Jmol 3D model Interactive image
MeSH 2-diethylaminoethanol
PubChem 7497
RTECS number KK5075000
UNII S6DL4M053U YesY
UN number 2686
Properties
C6H15NO
Molar mass 117.19 g·mol−1
Appearance Colourless liquid
Odor Ammoniacal
Density 884 mg mL−1
Melting point −70 °C; −94 °F; 203 K [1]
Boiling point 161.1 °C; 321.9 °F; 434.2 K
miscible[1]
log P 0.769
Vapor pressure 100 Pa (at 20 °C)
1.441–1.442
Hazards
GHS pictograms The flame pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The corrosion pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word DANGER
H226, H302, H312, H314, H317, H332
P280, P305+351+338, P310
Corrosive C
R-phrases R10, R20/21/22, R34
S-phrases (S1/2), S25, S26, S36/37/39, S45
Flash point 50 °C (122 °F; 323 K)
Explosive limits 1.4–11.7%
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
  • 1.113 g kg−1 (dermal, rabbit)
  • 1.3 g kg−1 (oral, rat)
924 ppm (rat, 4 hr)
1027 ppm (mouse)[2]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 10 ppm (50 mg/m3) [skin][1]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 10 ppm (50 mg/m3) [skin][1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
100 ppm[1]
Related compounds
Related alkanols
Related compounds
Diethylhydroxylamine
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Diethylethanolamine can be used as a precursor chemical to procaine. It can be reacted with 4-aminobenzoic acid to make procaine.

Applications[edit]

Diethylethanolamine is used as a corrosion inhibitor in steam and condensate lines by neutralizing carbonic acid and scavenging oxygen.

Preparation[edit]

Diethylethanolamine is prepared commercially by the reaction of diethylamine and ethylene oxide.[3]

(C2H5)2NH + cyclo(CH2CH2)O → (C2H5)2NCH2CH2OH

It is also possible to prepare it by the reaction of diethylamine and ethylene chlorohydrin.[4]

Safety[edit]

Diethylethanolamine is an irritant to the eyes, skin, and respiratory system. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health have set occupational exposure limits for workers handling the chemical at 10 ppm (50 mg/m3) over an eight-hour workday.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0210". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  2. ^ "2-Diethylaminoethanol". Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  3. ^ Bollmeier, Jr., Allen F. (1999). "Alkanolamines". In Kroschwitz, Jacqueline I. Kirk-Othmer Encylclopedia of Chemical Technology. 2 (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. pp. 1–34. ISBN 978-0471419617. 
  4. ^ "Diethylaminoethanol". USDA. 2001-2-15. Retrieved 2012-08-28.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  5. ^ "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards". CDC. 2011-04-04. Retrieved 11/8/2013.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)