DENIS J081730.0-615520

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DENIS J081730.0-615520
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Carina
Right ascension 08h 17m 30.096s[1]
Declination −61° 55′ 15.802″[1]
Characteristics
Spectral type T6[2]
Apparent magnitude (J) 13.6
J−H color index 0.087 ± 0.039[2]
J−K color index 0.093 ± 0.049[2]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv) ? km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 336 ± 54 mas/yr
Dec.: 1095 ± 410 mas/yr
Parallax (π) 204.08 ± 12.49[2] mas
Distance 16.0 ± 1.0 ly
(4.9 ± 0.3 pc)
Details
Mass 0.015[2] M
Radius ~0.1 R
Temperature 950[2] K
Other designations
DENIS J081730.0-615520
2MASS 08173001-6155158
WISEPA J081729.74-615504.1[3]
Database references
SIMBAD data

DENIS J081730.0-615520 (also known as 2MASS 08173001-6155158) is a T brown dwarf approximately 16 ly (4.9 pc) away in the constellation Carina. It was discovered by Etienne Artigau and his colleagues in April 2010. The star belongs to the T6 spectral class implying a photosphere temperature of about 950 K. It has a mass of about 15 MJ (Jupiter masses) or about 1.5% the mass of the Sun.[2]

DENIS J081730.0-615520 is the second nearest isolated T dwarf to the Sun (after UGPS J0722-05) and the fifth nearest (also after ε Indi Bab and SCR 1845-6357B) if one takes into account T dwarfs in multiple star systems. It is also the brightest T dwarf in the sky (in the J-band); it had been missed before due to its proximity to the galactic plane.[2]

Distance[edit]

DENIS J081730.0-615520 distance estimates

Source Parallax, mas Distance, pc Distance, ly Distance, Pm Ref.
Artigau et al. (2010) 203±13 4.93+0.34
−0.3
16.1+1.1
−1
152+10.4
−9.1
[2]

Non-trigonometric distance estimates are marked in italic. The most precise estimate is marked in bold.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chris Gelino, Davy Kirkpatrick, Adam Burgasser. "List of T dwarfs". DwarfArchives. Retrieved August 14, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Artigau, Etienne; Radigan, Jacqueline; Folkes, Stuart et al. (2010). "DENIS J081730.0-615520: An overlooked mid-T dwarf in the solar neighborhood". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 718 (1): L38–L42. arXiv:1006.3577. Bibcode:2010ApJ...718L..38A. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/718/1/L38. 
  3. ^ Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, A.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Thompson, Maggie A.; Bauer, James M.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bridge, Carrie R.; Lake, Sean E.; Petty, Sara M.; Stanford, S. A.; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Bailey, Vanessa; Beichman, Charles A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Bochanski, John J.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Capak, Peter L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Knox, Russell P.; Manohar, Swarnima; Masters, Daniel; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Prato, Lisa A.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Salvato, Mara; Schurr, Steven D.; Scoville, Nicholas Z.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Stern, Daniel; Stock, Nathan D.; Vacca, William D. (2011). "The First Hundred Brown Dwarfs Discovered by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE)". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement 197 (2): 19. arXiv:1108.4677v1. Bibcode:2011ApJS..197...19K. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/197/2/19. 

External links[edit]