DR Congo national football team

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DR Congo
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Les Léopards
English: The Leopards
AssociationFédération Congolaise de Football-Association (FECOFA)
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationUNIFFAC (Central Africa)
Head coachSébastien Desabre
CaptainChancel Mbemba
Most capsChancel Mbemba (85)
Top scorerDieumerci Mbokani (22)
Home stadiumStade des Martyrs
FIFA codeCOD
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 61 Increase 2 (20 June 2024)[1]
Highest28 (July–August 2017)
Lowest133 (October 2011)
First international
Belgian Congo 3–2 Northern Rhodesia 
(Belgian Congo; Date Unknown 1948)
Biggest win
 Congo-Kinshasa 10–1 Zambia 
(Kinshasa, Congo DR; 22 November 1969)
Biggest defeat
 Yugoslavia 9–0 Zaire 
(Gelsenkirchen, West Germany; 18 June 1974)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 1974)
Best resultGroup stage (1974)
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances20 (first in 1965)
Best resultChampions (1968, 1974)
African Nations Championship
Appearances5 (first in 2009)
Best resultChampions, (2009, 2016)
COSAFA Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2016)
Best resultFourth place (2016)

The DR Congo national football team (French: Équipe nationale de football de la République démocratique du Congo), recognised by FIFA as Congo DR, represents the Democratic Republic of the Congo in men's international football and it is controlled by the Congolese Association Football Federation. They are nicknamed Les Léopards, meaning The Leopards.[3] The team is a member of FIFA and the Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Congo DR have been ranked as high as 28th in the FIFA Rankings, as Zaire they were the first Sub-Saharan African team to qualify for the FIFA World Cup and twice won the Africa Cup of Nations. They are also one of the most successful teams in the African Nations Championship with 2 titles, along with Morocco. They are currently ranked 63rd in the FIFA Rankings.[4]

History

[edit]

Early history

[edit]

The Congolese Association Football Federation was founded in 1919 when the country was not independent. The team played their first game in 1948 as Belgian Congo against Northern Rhodesia, now Zambia. The team recorded a 3–2 victory at home. DR Congo has been FIFA affiliated since 1962 and has been a member of CAF since 1963. The team's first official match was on 11 April 1963, against Mauritania in the L'Amitié Tournament played in Dakar, Senegal. DR Congo won the match 6–0.[5] The national team appeared in the Africa Cup of Nations for the first time in 1965.

Glory period

[edit]

The Democratic Republic of the Congo had its first international success at the 1968 African Cup of Nations held in Ethiopia, beating Ghana 1–0 in the final. The team's biggest ever win came on 22 November 1969 when they recorded a 10–1 home victory against Zambia. Although a handful of Congolese players were playing in Europe (particularly Belgium) during these years, foreign-based players were seldom recalled for international duty; a rare exception was Julien Kialunda who represented Zaire (as the country was by then known) at the 1972 African Cup of Nations while playing for Anderlecht.

The second continental title came at the 1974 African Cup of Nations in Egypt. The Leopards recorded a 2–1 victory against Guinea, another 2–1 victory against rivals Congo and a 4–1 victory against Mauritius. These results carried Zaire through to the semi-finals where they beat hosts Egypt 3–2. In the final, Zaire drew with Zambia 2–2. Therefore, the match was replayed two days later, where Zaire won the game 2–0. Zaire player Ndaye Mulamba was top scorer with nine goals, which remains a record for the tournament. After this, the team returned to Zaire on the Presidential plane, lent to them by Mobutu Sese Seko.

Zaire were the first Sub-Saharan African team to participate in a World Cup, qualifying for the 1974 tournament in place of the 1970 participant Morocco, whom they defeated in the decisive qualifier 3–0 in Kinshasa.[6] Such was the desire to foster an identity of Zaire as a global player that Mobutu paid for advertising hoardings at the World Cup to display messages such as ‘Zaire-Peace’ and ‘Go to Zaire’.[7] At the tournament itself, Zaire did not manage to score any goals and lost all of its games, but gave credible performances against Scotland and Brazil. However, their 9–0 loss against Yugoslavia remains one of the worst World Cup defeats. A bizarre moment came in the match versus Brazil; facing a free-kick 25 yards out, defender Mwepu Ilunga, upon hearing the referee blow his whistle, ran out of the Zaire wall and kicked the ball upfield, for which he received a yellow card. This was voted the 17th greatest World Cup moment in a Channel 4 poll.[8] Ilunga has stated that he was quite aware of the rules and was hoping to convince the referee to send him off. The intended red card would have been a protest against his country's authorities, who were alleged to be depriving the players of their earnings.[9] Many contemporary commentators instead held it to be an example of African football's "naïvety and indiscipline".[10]

Crisis period

[edit]
Zaire versus Brazil in the 1974 World Cup
Zaire versus Scotland in 1974 World Cup

After winning the 1974 African Cup of Nations and participating in the 1974 World Cup, the team was eliminated in the first round of the 1976 African Cup of Nations after recording a draw and two losses in the group stage. Morocco went on to win the tournament. From 1978 to 1986, the country did not qualify for the African Cup of Nations, while not participating in qualification for the 1978 World Cup and 1986 World Cup. In the 1988 African Cup of Nations, Zaire finished last in their group despite having two draws.

Return to success

[edit]

From 1992 to 1996, Zaire, reached three consecutive African Cup of Nations quarter-finals. In 1992 and 1994, they were beaten by Nigeria, and in 1996 they were beaten by Ghana. In 1997, the country returned to its former name of Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the national team was re-branded as the Simbas, a nickname that stuck for the next nine years.[11] DR Congo played their first game on 8 June 1997 in Pointe-Noire which ended in a 1–0 loss to the Republic of the Congo. At the 1998 African Cup of Nations, DR Congo, led by Louis Watunda, surprisingly took third place, beating Cameroon in the quarter-finals and hosts Burkina Faso 4–1 on penalties in their last match after scoring three late goals to tie the encounter 4–4.

At the 2000 African Cup of Nations, the team finished third in their group, and in 2002 were eliminated in the quarter-finals by Senegal. Then, in 2004, DR Congo were eliminated after three straight defeats in the group stages. In 2006, led by Claude Le Roy, having finished second in the group behind Cameroon, the Congolese were eliminated in the quarter-finals by Egypt 4–1.

Struggles

[edit]

DR Congo were drawn in group 10 for qualifications for the 2008 African Cup of Nations, along with Libya, Namibia and Ethiopia. Before the last match day, the Congolese led the group, but they drew 1–1 with Libya in their final match while Namibia beat Ethiopia 3–2. This sent Namibia through to the Finals, while the Leopards were eliminated. DR Congo also failed to qualify for the 2010 World Cup. In 2009, DR Congo won the 2009 African Championship of Nations, a competition reserved to players in domestic leagues, a tournament they would again win in 2016. DR Congo reached the 2013 Africa Cup of Nations finals in South Africa but were knocked out in the group stages after drawing all three matches.

The Ibengé era: rise and near World Cup miss

[edit]

In the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations, DR Congo again drew all three group matches but this time finished second in the group behind Tunisia, and therefore advanced to the quarter-finals to play their rivals Republic of Congo, a match in which the Leopards came from two goals down to win 4–2. However, they were knocked out by the Ivory Coast 3–1 in the semi-finals. They ended up finishing third, beating Equatorial Guinea on penalties, after the third place match finished 0–0 in regulation time.

DR Congo under Ibengé improved radically and had an outstanding performance for many decades in a World Cup qualification. During the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification, DR Congo was grouped with Libya, Tunisia and Guinea. DR Congo managed an outstanding performance, beating Libya and Guinea home and away, but missed the chance after losing 1–2 to eventual World Cup qualifier Tunisia in Tunis and drew 2–2 at home to the same opponent.

Home stadium

[edit]

Stade des Martyrs has been the home of the national team since it's establishment and they roughly play their games at Lubumbashi.

Results and fixtures

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The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2023

[edit]
9 September 2023 AFCON qualification DR Congo  2–0  Sudan Kinshasa, DR Congo
17:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Stade des Martyrs
Referee: Samir Guezzaz (Morocco)
12 September Friendly South Africa  1–0  DR Congo Johannesburg, South Africa
Report Stadium: Orlando Stadium
Attendance: 9,140
Referee: Thulani Sibandze (Eswatini)
13 October Friendly New Zealand  1–1  DR Congo Murcia, Spain
Wood 90+1' (pen.) Report Bakambu 46' Stadium: Estadio Nueva Condomina
17 October Friendly Angola  0–0  DR Congo Lisbon, Portugal
Report
19 November 2026 World Cup qualification Sudan  1–0  DR Congo Benina, Libya
18:00 UTC+2
Report Stadium: Martyrs of February Stadium
Attendance: 3,700
Referee: Bamlak Tessema Weyesa (Ethiopia)

2024

[edit]
6 January Friendly DR Congo  0–0  Angola Dubai, United Arab Emirates
15:00 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Shabab Al Ahli Stadium
Referee: Sultan Al–Hammadi (United Arab Emirates)
10 January Friendly DR Congo  1–2  Burkina Faso Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
17:00 UTC+4
Report
Stadium: Baniyas Stadium
Attendance: 0
17 January 2023 AFCON GS DR Congo  1–1  Zambia San-Pédro, Ivory Coast
20:00 UTC±0
Report
Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium
Attendance: 15,478
Referee: Bamlak Tessema Weyesa (Ethiopia)
21 January 2023 AFCON GS Morocco  1–1  DR Congo San-Pédro, Ivory Coast
14:00 UTC±0
Report
Stadium: Laurent Pokou Stadium
Attendance: 13,342
Referee: Peter Waweru (Kenya)
24 January 2023 AFCON GS Tanzania  0–0  DR Congo Korhogo, Ivory Coast
20:00 UTC±0 Report Stadium: Amadou Gon Coulibaly Stadium
Attendance: 12,847
Referee: Amin Omar (Egypt)
2 February 2023 AFCON QF DR Congo  3–1  Guinea Abidjan, Ivory Coast
20:00 UTC±0
Report
Stadium: Alassane Ouattara Stadium
Attendance: 33,278[13]
Referee: Mustapha Ghorbal (Algeria)
7 February 2023 AFCON SF Ivory Coast  1–0  DR Congo Abidjan, Ivory Coast
20:00 UTC±0
Report Stadium: Alassane Ouattara Stadium
Attendance: 51,020
Referee: Ibrahim Mutaz (Libya)
6 June 2026 FIFA WC Qualifier Senegal  1–1  DR Congo Diamniadio, Senegal
19:00 UTC±0
Report
Stadium: Diamniadio Olympic Stadium
Referee: Mutaz Ibrahim (Libya)
9 June 2026 FIFA WC Qualifier DR Congo  1–0  Togo Kinshasa, DR Congo
17:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Stade des Martyrs
Referee: Mehrez Malki (Tunisia)

2025

[edit]
September 2026 FIFA WC Qualifier South Sudan  v  DR Congo TBD, South Sudan
September 2026 FIFA WC Qualifier DR Congo  v  Senegal TBD, DR Congo
October 2026 FIFA WC Qualifier Togo  v  DR Congo TBD, Togo
October 2026 FIFA WC Qualifier DR Congo  v  Sudan TBD, DR Congo

Coaches

[edit]

Players

[edit]

Current squad

[edit]

The following players have been selected for the 2026 FIFA World Cup qualification matches against Senegal and Togo on 6 and 9 June 2024 respectively.[14]

Caps and goals as of 9 June 2024, after match against Togo. [15]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Dimitry Bertaud (1998-06-06) 6 June 1998 (age 26) 4 0 France Montpellier
1GK Timothy Fayulu (1999-07-24) 24 July 1999 (age 24) 0 0 Switzerland Sion
1GK Esdras Kabamba (1999-06-24) 24 June 1999 (age 25) 0 0 Angola Bravos do Maquis

2DF Chancel Mbemba (captain) (1994-08-08) 8 August 1994 (age 29) 85 6 France Marseille
2DF Arthur Masuaku (1993-11-07) 7 November 1993 (age 30) 26 3 Turkey Beşiktaş
2DF Henoc Inonga Baka (1993-11-01) 1 November 1993 (age 30) 16 0 Tanzania Simba
2DF Gédéon Kalulu (1997-08-29) 29 August 1997 (age 26) 15 0 France Lorient
2DF Dylan Batubinsika (1996-02-15) 15 February 1996 (age 28) 8 0 France Saint-Étienne
2DF Joris Kayembe (1994-08-08) 8 August 1994 (age 29) 7 0 Belgium Genk
2DF Rocky Bushiri (1999-11-30) 30 November 1999 (age 24) 2 0 Scotland Hibernian
2DF Axel Tuanzebe (1997-11-14) 14 November 1997 (age 26) 1 0 England Ipswich Town

3MF Samuel Moutoussamy (1996-08-12) 12 August 1996 (age 27) 34 0 France Nantes
3MF Gaël Kakuta (1991-06-21) 21 June 1991 (age 33) 26 3 France Amiens
3MF Chadrac Akolo (1995-04-01) 1 April 1995 (age 29) 25 2 Switzerland St. Gallen
3MF Théo Bongonda (1995-11-20) 20 November 1995 (age 28) 20 3 Russia Spartak Moscow
3MF Edo Kayembe (1998-08-03) 3 August 1998 (age 25) 20 1 England Watford
3MF Aaron Tshibola (1995-01-25) 25 January 1995 (age 29) 14 1 United Arab Emirates Hatta
3MF Charles Pickel (1997-05-15) 15 May 1997 (age 27) 14 0 Italy Cremonese
3MF Grady Diangana (1998-04-19) 19 April 1998 (age 26) 5 0 England West Bromwich Albion
3MF Noah Sadiki (2004-12-17) 17 December 2004 (age 19) 0 0 Belgium Union Saint-Gilloise

4FW Meschak Elia (1997-08-06) 6 August 1997 (age 26) 46 9 Switzerland Young Boys
4FW Yoane Wissa (1996-09-03) 3 September 1996 (age 27) 26 5 England Brentford
4FW Fiston Mayele (1994-06-24) 24 June 1994 (age 30) 15 3 Egypt Pyramids
4FW Simon Banza (1996-08-13) 13 August 1996 (age 27) 8 0 Portugal Braga
4FW Samuel Essende (1998-01-30) 30 January 1998 (age 26) 2 0 Portugal Vizela

Recent call-ups

[edit]

The following players have also been called up for DR Congo in the last twelve months and are still eligible to represent.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Lionel Mpasi (1994-08-01) 1 August 1994 (age 29) 15 0 France Rodez 2023 AFCON
GK Baggio Siadi (1997-07-21) 21 July 1997 (age 26) 4 0 Democratic Republic of the Congo Mazembe 2023 AFCON

DF Brian Bayeye (2000-06-30) 30 June 2000 (age 24) 3 0 Italy Ascoli 2023 AFCON
DF Ngonda Muzinga (1994-12-31) 31 December 1994 (age 29) 24 0 Latvia Riga 2023 AFCON PRE
DF Merveille Bokadi (1996-05-21) 21 May 1996 (age 28) 22 1 Belgium Standard Liège 2023 AFCON PRE
DF Dieumerci Amale (1998-10-17) 17 October 1998 (age 25) 18 0 Morocco Difaâ El Jadidi 2023 AFCON PRE
DF Jordan Ikoko (1994-02-03) 3 February 1994 (age 30) 9 0 Cyprus Pafos 2023 AFCON PRE
DF Vital N'Simba (1993-07-08) 8 July 1993 (age 31) 2 0 France Bordeaux 2023 AFCON PRE
DF Arsène Zola (1996-02-23) 23 February 1996 (age 28) 1 0 Morocco Wydad Casablanca 2023 AFCON PRE

MF Omenuke Mfulu (1994-03-20) 20 March 1994 (age 30) 7 0 Spain Las Palmas 2023 AFCON
MF Neeskens Kebano (1992-03-10) 10 March 1992 (age 32) 35 6 United Arab Emirates Al Jazira 2023 AFCON PRE
MF Makabi Lilepo (1997-07-27) 27 July 1997 (age 26) 7 0 France Valenciennes 2023 AFCON PRE
MF William Balikwisha (1999-05-12) 12 May 1999 (age 25) 4 0 Belgium Standard Liège 2023 AFCON PRE
MF Pelly Ruddock Mpanzu (1994-03-22) 22 March 1994 (age 30) 3 0 England Luton Town 2023 AFCON PRE
MF Arnaud Lusamba (1997-01-04) 4 January 1997 (age 27) 2 0 Turkey Pendikspor 2023 AFCON PRE
MF Jonathan Okita (1996-10-05) 5 October 1996 (age 27) 2 0 Switzerland Zürich 2023 AFCON PRE

FW Cédric Bakambu (1991-04-11) 11 April 1991 (age 33) 54 16 Spain Real Betis 2023 AFCON
FW Silas Katompa Mvumpa (1998-10-06) 6 October 1998 (age 25) 14 1 Germany VfB Stuttgart 2023 AFCON
FW Jonathan Bolingi (1994-06-30) 30 June 1994 (age 30) 34 9 Serbia Vojvodina 2023 AFCON PRE
FW Ben Malango (1993-11-10) 10 November 1993 (age 30) 21 6 Qatar Qatar SC 2023 AFCON PRE
FW Jackson Muleka (1999-10-04) 4 October 1999 (age 24) 14 1 Turkey Beşiktaş 2023 AFCON PRE
FW Aldo Kalulu (1996-01-21) 21 January 1996 (age 28) 5 0 Serbia Partizan 2023 AFCON PRE
FW Gaëtan Laura (1995-08-06) 6 August 1995 (age 28) 0 0 Turkey Samsunspor 2023 AFCON PRE

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Player has retired from international football.
SUS Suspended from the national team.

Records

[edit]
As of 9 June 2024[16]
Players in bold are still active with DR Congo.

Most appearances

[edit]
Chancel Mbemba is DR Congo's most capped player with 85 appearances.
Rank Name Caps Goals Career
1 Chancel Mbemba 85 6 2012–present
2 Issama Mpeko 81 2 2011–2023
3 Robert Kidiaba 64 0 2002–2015
4 Cédric Bakambu 54 16 2015–present
5 Zola Matumona 53 9 2002–2014
Trésor Mputu 53 14 2004–2022
7 Joël Kimwaki 52 3 2009–2016
8 Yannick Bolasie 50 9 2013–2022
Marcel Mbayo 50 4 1996–2011
10 Dieumerci Mbokani 49 22 2005–2022

Top goalscorers

[edit]
Dieumerci Mbokani is DR Congo's top scorer with 22 goals.
Rank Name Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Dieumerci Mbokani 22 49 0.45 2005–2022
2 Cédric Bakambu 16 54 0.3 2015–present
3 Shabani Nonda 14 22 0.64 2000–2008
Trésor Mputu 14 53 0.26 2004–2022
5 Jean-Jacques Yemweni 12 16 0.75 2000–2007
6 Ngoy Kabongo 11 22 0.5 1981–1991
7 Ndaye Mulamba 10 20 0.5 1973–1976
8 Kakoko Etepé 9 31 0.29 1970–1976
Dioko Kaluyituka 9 31 0.29 2004–2013
Jonathan Bolingi 9 34 0.26 2014–2022
Ndombe Mubele 9 45 0.2 2013–2018
Meschak Elia 9 46 0.2 2016–present
Yannick Bolasie 9 50 0.18 2013–2022
Zola Matumona 9 53 0.17 2002–2014

Competitive record

[edit]

FIFA World Cup

[edit]
FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
as  Congo and  Congo-Léopoldville as  Congo and  Congo-Léopoldville
1930 to 1962 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member
as  Congo-Kinshasa as  Congo-Kinshasa
England 1966 Did not enter Did not enter
as  Zaire as  Zaire
Mexico 1970 Entry not accepted by FIFA Entry not accepted by FIFA
West Germany 1974 Group stage 16th 3 0 0 3 0 14 11 8 1 2 20 4
Argentina 1978 Withdrew Withdrew
Spain 1982 Did not qualify 4 2 1 1 6 9
Mexico 1986 Banned Banned
Italy 1990 Did not qualify 6 2 2 2 7 7
United States 1994 3 0 1 2 1 3
France 1998 8 2 2 4 11 10
as Democratic Republic of the Congo Democratic Republic of the Congo  DR Congo as Democratic Republic of the Congo Democratic Republic of the Congo  DR Congo
South Korea Japan 2002 Did not qualify 10 4 2 4 17 18
Germany 2006 10 4 4 2 14 10
South Africa 2010 6 3 0 3 14 6
Brazil 2014 8 3 3 2 11 5
Russia 2018 8 6 1 1 20 9
Qatar 2022 8 3 3 2 11 8
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined 4 2 1 1 4 2
Morocco Portugal Spain 2030 To be determined
Saudi Arabia 2034
Total Group stage 1/15 3 0 0 3 0 14 86 39 21 26 136 91

Africa Cup of Nations

[edit]
Africa Cup of Nations record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Sudan 1957 Part of Belgium Part of Belgium
Egypt 1959
Ethiopia 1962 Not affiliated to CAF Not affiliated to CAF
Ghana 1963
Played as  Congo-Léopoldville Played as  Congo-Léopoldville
Tunisia 1965 Group stage 5th 2 0 0 2 2 8 6 2 0 2 8 8
Played as  Congo-Kinshasa Played as  Congo-Kinshasa
Ethiopia 1968 Champions 1st 5 4 0 1 10 2 5 3 0 1 7 4
Sudan 1970 Group stage 7th 3 0 1 2 2 5 Qualified as defending champions
Played as  Zaire Played as  Zaire
Cameroon 1972 Fourth place 4th 5 1 2 2 9 11 4 4 0 0 9 3
Egypt 1974 Champions 1st 6 4 1 1 14 8 4 3 0 1 12 3
Ethiopia 1976 Group stage 7th 3 0 1 2 3 6 Qualified as defending champions
Ghana 1978 Did not enter Did not enter
Nigeria 1980 Did not qualify 4 3 0 1 10 10
Libya 1982 4 2 0 2 8 9
Ivory Coast 1984 Withdrew Withdrew
Egypt 1986 Did not qualify 8 4 2 1 8 4
Morocco 1988 Group stage 7th 3 0 2 1 2 3 4 1 3 0 3 1
Algeria 1990 Did not qualify 2 0 1 1 0 2
Senegal 1992 Quarter-finals 6th 3 0 2 1 2 3 6 3 1 2 6 4
Tunisia 1994 Quarter-finals 7th 3 1 1 1 2 3 6 3 2 1 13 3
South Africa 1996 Quarter-finals 8th 3 1 0 2 2 3 6 3 1 2 10 5
Played as Democratic Republic of the Congo / Democratic Republic of the Congo / Democratic Republic of the Congo DR Congo Played as Democratic Republic of the Congo / Democratic Republic of the Congo / Democratic Republic of the Congo DR Congo
Burkina Faso 1998 Third place 3rd 6 3 1 2 10 9 6 2 3 1 6 5
Ghana Nigeria 2000 Group stage 12th 3 0 2 1 0 1 6 3 1 2 7 6
Mali 2002 Quarter-finals 6th 4 1 1 2 3 4 8 3 3 2 13 10
Tunisia 2004 Group stage 15th 3 0 0 3 1 6 6 3 2 1 9 5
Egypt 2006 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 1 2 3 6 10 4 4 2 14 10
Ghana 2008 Did not qualify 6 3 2 1 14 10
Angola 2010 6 3 0 3 14 6
Equatorial Guinea Gabon 2012 6 2 3 1 11 10
South Africa 2013 Group stage 10th 3 0 3 0 3 3 4 4 0 0 12 5
Equatorial Guinea 2015 Third place 3rd 6 1 4 1 7 7 6 3 0 3 10 9
Gabon 2017 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 1 1 7 5 6 5 0 1 16 6
Egypt 2019 Round of 16 14th 4 1 1 2 6 6 6 2 3 1 8 6
Cameroon 2021 Did not qualify 6 2 3 1 4 5
Ivory Coast 2023 Fourth place 4th 7 1 5 1 6 5 6 4 0 2 11 4
Morocco 2025 To be determined To be determined
Kenya Tanzania Uganda 2027
Total 2 Titles 20/34 80 21 29 30 94 104 147 74 34 36 243 153

African Nations Championship

[edit]
African Nations Championship record Qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Ivory Coast 2009 Final Winners 5 3 1 1 7 5 4 3 0 1 7 2
Sudan 2011 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 1 2 3 5 2 1 1 0 3 2
South Africa 2014 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 3 3 2 1 1 0 2 2
Rwanda 2016 Final Winners 6 4 1 1 14 7 DR Congo qualified by walkover.
Morocco 2018 Did not qualify 2 0 2 0 1 1
Cameroon 2020 Quarter-finals 4 2 1 1 5 4 2 2 0 0 6 1
Algeria 2022 Group stage 3 0 2 1 0 3 2 2 0 0 7 1
Total 2 titles 5/6 23 12 4 7 32 24 12 7 4 1 19 8

African Games

[edit]
African Games record
Year Result Pld W D L GF GA
Republic of the Congo 1965 5th 5 3 1 1 20 8
1973-1987 Did not enter
Total 1/4 5 3 1 1 20 8

Head-to-head record

[edit]

Including the record of  Togo. Updated as for 9 June 2024.

Opponent P W D L GF GA W% L%
 Algeria 7 0 4 3 4 10 0 42.86
 Angola 17 8 5 4 22 13 47.06 23.53
 Bahrain 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 100
 Benin 4 3 1 0 10 4 75 0
 Botswana 5 2 3 0 4 0 40 0
 Brazil 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 100
 Burkina Faso[note 1] 13 5 2 6 23 21 38.46 46.15
 Burundi 4 4 0 0 9 3 100 0
 Cameroon 36 11 7 18 32 46 30.56 50
 Cape Verde 3 1 2 0 3 2 33.33 0
 Central African Republic 7 5 1 1 18 5 71.43 14.29
 Chad 1 1 0 0 4 0 100 0
 Congo 38 18 12 8 66 38 47.37 21.05
 Djibouti 4 3 1 0 21 3 75 0
 Egypt 14 1 5 8 15 27 7.14 57.14
 Equatorial Guinea 3 1 1 1 5 2 33.33 33.33
 Eswatini 7 3 1 3 11 6 62.5 12.5
 Ethiopia 6 5 0 1 11 4 83.33 16.67
 Gabon 19 6 8 5 16 16 31.58 26.32
 Gambia 3 1 1 1 3 5 33.33 33.33
 Ghana 24 5 6 13 23 40 20.83 54.17
 Guinea 14 6 2 4 15 10 42.86 28.57
 Iraq 2 0 0 2 1 3 0 100
 Ivory Coast 20 5 6 9 27 34 25 45
 Kenya 12 6 2 4 16 13 50 33.33
 Lesotho 7 3 4 0 17 4 42.86 0
 Liberia 9 4 2 3 15 10 44.44 33.33
 Libya 12 5 5 2 19 11 41.67 16.67
 Madagascar 14 7 3 4 27 15 50 28.57
 Malawi 7 4 2 1 9 6 57.14 14.29
 Mali 11 2 4 5 14 18 18.18 45.45
 Mauritania 5 5 0 0 15 1 100 0
 Mauritius 5 5 0 0 16 3 100 0
 Mexico 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 100
 Morocco 17 3 9 5 14 20 17.65 29.41
 Mozambique 7 5 2 0 15 7 71.43 0
 Namibia 3 1 1 1 4 7 33.33 33.33
 New Zealand 2 0 2 0 2 2 0 0
 Niger 3 1 1 1 3 3 33.33 33.33
 Nigeria 10 4 1 5 16 16 40 50
 North Korea 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
 Oman 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0
 Qatar 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0
 Romania 2 0 2 0 2 2 0 0
 Rwanda 5 2 0 3 10 7 40 60
 Saudi Arabia 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 100
 Scotland 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 100
 Senegal 13 3 4 6 13 18 23.08 46.15
 Seychelles 2 2 0 0 7 0 100 0
 Sierra Leone 3 3 0 0 8 1 100 0
 South Africa 9 1 2 6 5 10 11.11 66.67
 Sudan 12 7 2 3 20 11 58.33 25
 Tanzania 15 5 7 3 14 11 38.46 23.08
 Togo 17 13 3 1 41 11 76.47 5.88
 Tunisia 20 5 4 11 17 27 25 55
 Uganda 16 9 2 5 29 10 56.25 31.25
 Yugoslavia 1 0 0 1 0 9 0 100
 Zambia 27 8 12 7 43 35 30.77 26.92
 Zimbabwe 8 3 2 3 17 10 37.5 37.5
  1. ^ Includes the results of  Upper Volta.

References

[edit]
  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 20 June 2024. Retrieved 20 June 2024.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 10 July 2024. Retrieved 10 July 2024.
  3. ^ "BBC SPORT | WORLD CUP | History | 1974: Zaire's show of shame". BBC News. 22 May 2002. Archived from the original on 20 September 2017. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  4. ^ "FIFA". fifa.com. Archived from the original on 8 September 2021. Retrieved 18 January 2024.
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