Dagmar Lurz

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Dagmar Lurz
Dagmar Lurz - 1980.jpg
Personal information
Country represented West Germany
Born (1959-01-18) 18 January 1959 (age 58)
Dortmund, West Germany
Former coach Erich Zeller
Retired 1980

Dagmar Lurz (born 18 January 1959) is a German former figure skater. She is the 1980 Olympic bronze medalist, the 1980 World silver medalist, and a four-time European silver medalist (1977–80).

Personal life[edit]

Dagmar Lurz was born 18 January 1959 in Dortmund, West Germany. She studied medicine at the university in Cologne.

Career[edit]

Lurz trained in Oberstdorf under the guidance of her coach, Erich Zeller. Her main international rivals were Anett Pötzsch, Linda Fratianne, and Emi Watanabe. Like Pötzsch, Lurz was known primarily for her strong compulsory figures, usually placing slightly behind Poetzsch in figures at most major competitions between 1977 and 1980.

Lurz was able to complete two different triple jumps, the Salchow and loop, making her technically competitive with other skaters such as Pötzsch and Fratianne. However, even with successfully completed triple jumps, she typically placed significantly lower in the short program and free skating segments due to low presentation scores.

Her most successful year came in 1980, when she won the silver medals at the Europeans and the Worlds behind Pötzsch and the bronze medal at the Winter Olympics behind Pötzsch and Fratianne. These results were highly controversial, given Lurz's short program and free skating performances at these competitions.[1][2]

Lurz is now an ISU Judge and Referee for Germany.[3] She serves as a physician for the German team.

Results[edit]

International
Event 71–72 72–73 73–74 74–75 75–76 76–77 77–78 78–79 79–80
Winter Olympics 10th 3rd
World Champ. 17th 9th 3rd 4th 4th 2nd
European Champ. 8th 6th 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd
Nebelhorn Trophy 3rd
National
German Champ. 5th 3rd 3rd 3rd 1st 1st 1st 1st

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Miss Fratianne Lifts Standing; Gains on the Leader". The New York Times. 22 February 1980. 
  2. ^ Amdur, Neil (21 February 1980). "Judging in Skating Raises Eyebrows; A Virtual Walkover". The New York Times. 
  3. ^ "ISU Communication No. 1467". Archived from the original on 2009-02-03.