Daiamami Genki

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Daiamami Genki
大奄美 元規
Daiamami 2017.jpg
Daiamami in 2017
Personal information
BornSakamoto Genki
(1992-12-15) December 15, 1992 (age 27)
Tatsugō, Kagoshima, Japan
Height1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight185 kg (408 lb; 29 st 2 lb)
Career
StableOitekaze
UniversityNihon University
Current ranksee below
DebutJanuary, 2016
Highest rankMaegashira 11 (May, 2018)
Championships1 (Jūryō)
* Up to date as of July 9, 2020.

Daiamami Genki (Japanese: 大奄美 元規, born December 15, 1992 as Genki Sakamoto (坂元 元規)) is a Japanese professional sumo wrestler from Tatsugō, Kagoshima. After a successful amateur career, he turned professional in January 2016, making the top makuuchi division that November of the following year. His highest rank has been maegashira 11. He wrestles for Oitekaze stable.

Early life and sumo background[edit]

He started sumo in his second year of elementary school, eventually in high school he would go on to win Kanazawa high school sumo tournament helping him to join the prestigious Nihon University sumo program which he would later be Captain. He injured his Medial meniscus in his third year having to undergo corrective surgery to fix. After graduating he became a business association player after finding employment at Nihon University as a staff member. After winning the 2015 Japan Corporate Sumo Tournament one of the four tournaments that grants tsukedashi, he decided to join Oitekaze stable under fellow Nihon University graduate Daishōyama.

Career[edit]

He made his debut in January, 2016. Because of his amateur success he was granted a makushita tsukedashi allowing him to skip the lower divisions of sumo. He quickly rose up the ranks recording only one make-koshi or losing record on the way to the makuuchi division. He won the jūryō division yūshō or championship in July 2017 and followed up with another kachi-koshi or winning record in September.[1] He made his makuuchi debut in November 2017 at the rank of maegashira 14.[2] After a 6–9 record he produced kachi-koshi or winning records in his second and third top division tournaments, and was promoted to his highest rank to date of maegashira 11 in May. However he scored only 4–11 in this tournament and was demoted back to jūryō. He returned to makuuchi after the September 2018 tournament where he scored 11–4, losing a playoff for the championship to Tokushōryū. He was unable to get winning records in the November 2018 and January 2019 tournaments and was demoted to jūryō again. He returned to makuuchi in March 2020 following an 11-4 record in the previous tournament.

Fighting style[edit]

Daimami is a yotsu-sumo wrestler who prefers grappling techniques to pushing or thrusting. His favoured grip on his opponent's mawashi is migi-yotsu, a left hand outside, right hand inside position. His most common winning kimarite is a straightforward yori-kiri, or push out.

Career record[edit]

Daiamami Genki[3]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2016 Makushita tsukedashi #15
4–3
 
West Makushita #11
4–3
 
East Makushita #9
4–3
 
East Makushita #6
4–3
 
West Makushita #3
4–3
 
West Makushita #1
4–3
 
2017 West Jūryō #13
10–5
 
East Jūryō #9
8–7
 
West Jūryō #7
7–8
 
East Jūryō #8
11–4
Champion

 
East Jūryō #3
9–6
 
West Maegashira #14
6–9
 
2018 East Maegashira #17
8–7
 
East Maegashira #16
10–5
 
East Maegashira #11
4–11
 
East Jūryō #2
6–9
 
East Jūryō #4
11–4–P
 
East Maegashira #15
7–8
 
2019 East Maegashira #16
4–11
 
West Jūryō #3
7–8
 
West Jūryō #3
5–10
 
East Jūryō #8
11–4
 
West Jūryō #1
6–9
 
West Jūryō #4
6–9
 
2020 East Jūryō #6
11–4
 
West Maegashira #17
5–10
 
East Jūryō #4
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
East Jūryō #4

 
x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Young rikishi offer new hope for sumo". Japan Times. 23 November 2017. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Harumafuji tops rankings for Kyushu Basho". Japan Times. 30 October 2017. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  3. ^ "Daiamami Genki Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2018-05-27.

External links[edit]

  • Daiamami Genki's official biography (English) at the Grand Sumo Homepage