Daihatsu C-series engine

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The Daihatsu C-series engine is a range of compact three-cylinder, internal combustion piston engines, designed by Daihatsu, which is a subsidiary of Toyota. The engines range from 843 to 993 cc and have been manufactured in petrol and diesel-driven series. They have cast iron engine blocks and aluminum cylinder heads, and are of either SOHC or DOHC design, with belt driven heads. The engine first appeared in the all-new Daihatsu Charade in October 1977, in "CB20" form.[1]

Most common is the 1-liter CB, which was also available as the diesel CL. There is an 843 cc version called the CD and the extremely rare 926 cc homologation special called the CE.

CB (993 cc)[edit]

The 993 cc (1.0 L; 60.6 cu in) CB engine appeared in October 1977, for the then-new Daihatsu Charade. It features 120 degree crank throws and a counter-rotating balance shaft.[2] Bore and stroke are 76.0 mm (2.99 in) and 73.0 mm (2.87 in) respectively. It also incorporated mother concern Toyota's lean-burn design to run cleaner.[2]

It was also fitted to the Daihatsu Hijet, sometimes referred to as the "Daihatsu 1000" when equipped with this engine. It was fitted to the S70/75/76 and S85 models. Italy's Innocenti also used this engine for many variants of their Minitre/990/Small range of cars. De Tomaso was also the first to turbocharge this type of engine, first for a Daihatsu show car and later for the Innocenti Turbo deTomaso.

Versions

Power Torque Norm Comp. Fuel
system
Cat Fitment Notes
PS kW at rpm Nm lbft at rpm
CB-10[3] 6V
SOHC
55 40 5500 77 57 2800 JIS 8.7 single
carb
1977.10-1980.10 Charade G10
CB-11[4] 55 40 5500 76.5 56 2800 9.1 1980.10-1983.01 Charade G10
CB-12[5] 55 40 5500 76.5 56 2800 9.5 Charade G11 low-powered version
CB-20[3] 50 37 5500 73 54 3000 DIN 8.7 Charade G10
Mitsubishi Jetstar (Indonesia)
European/export version,
52 PS from 1981
52 38 5600 75 55 3200 9.0
CB-22[5] 60 44 5600 81 60 3200 JIS 9.5 Charade G11V commercial emissions standards, also installed in Taiwanese-built Charades[6]
CB-23 52 38 5600 75 55 3200 DIN 9.5 Charade G100 export
CB-24 52 38 75 55 9.5 1993-96 Charade G202 Australia only
CB-31 60 44 5600 80 59 3200 JIS 9.1 1979.09-1980.10 Charade G10
CB-32[4] 60 44 5600 81 60 3200 1980.10-1983.01 Charade G10
CB-33[5] 60 44 5600 81 60 3200 9.5 Charade G11
CB-34[5] 55 40 5500 76.5 56 2800 Electronic
carb
1983.01-1985.03 Charade G11 "CF" Fuel efficiency version
CB-35[7] 55 40 5500 76.5 56 2800 1985.03-1987.01 Charade G11 "CX" EFC-II fuel efficient
CB-36[8] 50 37 5600 75 55 3200 9.5 single
carb
Charade G100
CB-37[8] 55 40 5600 78 58 3600 Charade G100
CB-41 6V
SOHC
43 32 5200 72.6 54 3200 SAE 8.7/9.0/9.1 single carb 1983-86 Hijet S75/S76, 1986–88 Hijet S86, 1993-97 Hijet S85 horizontally mounted, export
45 33 74 55 2400 DIN
CB-42 47 35 9.5 EFi 1994.06-98 Hijet S86 horizontally mounted, export
CB-50[9] 6V
SOHC
turbo
80 59 5500 118 87 3500 JIS 8.0 single
carb
1983.09-1987.01 Charade G11 DeTomaso
CB-51[10] 73 54 5600 108 80 3600 1987.01-1988.02 Charade G100
CB-60 68 50 5500 106 78 3200 DIN Charade G11 Turbo, Innocenti Turbo DeTomaso export version, 72 PS in the Innocenti
CB-61 68 50 5500 106 78 3200 Charade G100 Turbo export version
CB-70[8] 12V
DOHC
turbo
105 77 6500 130 96 3500 JIS 7.8 EFi 1987.01-1993 Charade GTti/GTxx Intercooler
CB-80 101 74 6500 130 96 3500 DIN Charade GTti (G100) export version
CB-90 6V
SOHC
54 40 5750 80 59 3000 CEE 9.5 EFi 1987-1993 Charade G100 Europe[11]
53 40 5200 78.5 58 3600 SAE 1989.10-1992 Charade G100 USA, power figures in "hp"

CD (843 cc)[edit]

The 843 cc CD engine was usually fitted in export market Daihatsu Hijets (also known as the "Daihatsu 850").[12] Bore and stroke are 70.0 mm (2.76 in) and 73.0 mm (2.87 in) respectively. Chile (and possibly other markets) also received this engine in the Daihatsu Charade, called the "G20" or "G21" when thus equipped.

CE (926 cc)[edit]

The CE engine is turbocharged 926 cc version of 993 cc CB engine, exclusively only for Daihatsu Charade 926 Turbo. The displacement was downsized by reducing the bore size from 76.0 mm to 73.4 mm (73.4 mm x 73.0 mm), this has to be done because of FIA homologation regulation at that time. Daihatsu wanted to take part in the World Rally Championship for cars under 1,300 cc (Group B/9), so with a 1.4 equivalence factor for forced induction engines, this meant that the downsized engine was classified as being of 1296.4 cc.[13]

In 1985, at the Tokyo Motor Show, Daihatsu introduced the 926R, a prototype of a mid engine Charade, developed together with De Tomaso. This race specification CE engine was built in DOHC 12-valve configuration, producing 120 PS (118.4 hp; 88.3 kW) @6500rpm and 147 N⋅m (15.0 kg⋅m; 108.4 lbf⋅ft) @3500rpm. However, because of significant crashes in the 1985 World Rally Championship, Group B was banned and the 926R project was cancelled.

Only 200 units homologation limited Charade 926 Turbo road car were built by Daihatsu, but the CE engine that was fitted in this car was the SOHC 6-valve version based from bored-down CB50 turbo engine and only producing 76 PS (75.0 hp; 55.9 kW) @5500rpm and 108 N⋅m (11.0 kg⋅m; 79.7 lbf⋅ft) @3500rpm.

CL (993 cc diesel)[edit]

The turbodiesel CL50 engine
1988-1990 Innocenti 990 diesel SL (rear)

The diesel version of the CB shares that engine's dimensions, for 993 cc (1.0 L; 60.6 cu in). It appeared in 1983, along with the second generation of the Daihatsu Charade.[14] There was also the CL50, a turbocharged version producing 50 PS (37 kW). This engine was also used in the Innocenti 990 diesel.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Car Graphic: Car Archives Vol. 5, '70s Japanese Cars (in Japanese). Tokyo: Nigensha. 2007. p. 137. ISBN 978-4-544-09175-5.
  2. ^ a b Yamaguchi, Jack K. (1978), Lösch, Annamaria (ed.), "Successes- Excesses", World Cars 1978, Pelham, NY: The Automobile Club of Italy/Herald Books: 64, ISBN 0-910714-10-X
  3. ^ a b Braunschweig, Robert; Büschi, Hans-Ulrich, eds. (March 6, 1980). "Automobil Revue '80" (in German and French). 75. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag, AG: 249. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. ^ a b 別冊CG: 自動車アーカイヴ 80年代の日本 [Car Graphic: Car Archives Vol. 11, '80s Japanese Cars] (in Japanese). Tokyo: Nigensha. 2007. p. 251. ISBN 978-4-544-91018-6.
  5. ^ a b c d New シャレード [New Charade] (catalog) (in Japanese), Daihatsu Motor Co, January 1983, p. 8, 27870 ① 252.7A 5801KB
  6. ^ Zeng Yanhao (2017-12-24). "1988 羽田大發銀翼/祥瑞型錄" [1988 Daihatsu Skywing/Charade Brochure]. 7car (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 2018-05-19.
  7. ^ 新シャレード Gasoline Series [New Charade] (catalog) (in Japanese), Daihatsu Motor Co, March 1985, p. 24, 11030 ③ 100A 6003KB
  8. ^ a b c 80's Car Archives, p. 253
  9. ^ 80's Car Archives, p. 252
  10. ^ Büschi, Hans-Ulrich, ed. (3 March 1989). Automobil Revue 1988 (in German and French). 83. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag AG. p. 238. ISBN 3-444-00469-9.
  11. ^ Quattroruote: Tutte le Auto del Mondo 1992 (in Italian). Milano: Editoriale Domus S.p.A. 1992. p. 160.
  12. ^ "Daihatsu Car Parts". Japarts Limited. Archived from the original on 2012-11-10. Retrieved 2013-09-27.
  13. ^ Auger, Jay (2016-01-18). "Daihatsu Charade 926 Turbo (Group B)". Rally Group B Shrine. Retrieved 2020-04-09.
  14. ^ Ruiz, Marco (1986). 'The Complete History of the Japanese Car: 1907 to the Present. Rome: ERVIN srl. p. 123. ISBN 0-517-61777-3.