Daisy Model 25

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Model 25
Place of origin United States
Production history
Designer Charles F. Lefever
Manufacturer Daisy
Unit cost $49.99 (MSRP)[1]
Produced 1917–1978, 2007-present
No. built 8 million
Specifications
Weight 3 lb (1.4 kg) [1]
Length 37 in (94 cm) [1]

Cartridge .177 cal. (4.5 mm) BB [1]
Caliber 12 .177 cal. (4.5 mm) BB [1]
Action Pump action [1]
Muzzle velocity 350 ft/s (110 m/s) [1]
Effective firing range 195 yd (178 m) [1]
Feed system spring-loaded
Sights Iron sights

The Daisy Model 25 is a BB gun, modeled after a pump action shotgun with a trombone pump action mechanism. The Model 25 dominated the low price, higher performance airgun market for over 50 years (1914-1978) before discontinuation. They re-entered production in 2009.

The Model 25 was designed by Charles F. Lefever.[2] By some accounts, 15 million pieces were sold by 1957[3] and 20 million by 1980.[4] Other estimates are "over 8 million".[5]

Lever action models generally have very low velocities, around 275 ft/s (84 m/s), a result of the weak springs used to keep cocking efforts low for use by youths. The Daisy Model 25 pump-action BB gun typically achieved 350 ft/s (110 m/s).[6] However, the 25's capacity was only 50 BBs, in comparison to the 1000 BB capacity of some leverguns. The 25 does have an advantage in ammunition feeding, however, in that its feeding is spring-loaded, as opposed to many gravity-fed guns which require a shift in gun angle to reload a BB.

The re-issued version is made in China and has a muzzle velocity of approx 350 ft/s (110 m/s).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Daisy Outdoor Products". 
  2. ^ http://www.nramuseum.org/guns/the-galleries/for-the-fun-of-it/case-48-airguns/daisy-model-25-slide-action-air-rifle.aspx
  3. ^ Walter Harold Black Smith (1957). Smith's standard encyclopedia of gas, air and spring guns of the world. Castle Books. p. 203. 
  4. ^ Popular Mechanics. Hearst Magazines. March 1980. p. 90. ISSN 0032-4558. 
  5. ^ http://www.daisymuseum.com/html/timeline/1910.htm
  6. ^ https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/back-basics-daisy-model-25/