Dajia River

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Dajia River
大甲溪上游.JPG
Native name 大甲溪
Country Taiwan
Physical characteristics
Main source Nanhu Mountain
3,637 metres (11,932 ft)
River mouth Taiwan Strait
Length 124.20 kilometres (77.17 mi)
Discharge
  • Average rate:
    31 cubic metres per second (1,100 cu ft/s)
Basin features
Basin size 1,235.73 square kilometres (477.12 sq mi)

Dajia River (Chinese: 大甲溪; pinyin: Dàjiǎ Xī; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Tāi-kah-khoe; literally: "big shell river") is a river in north-central Taiwan. It flows through Taichung City for 124 km.[1] The sources of the Dajia are: Hsuehshan and Nanhu Mountain in the Central Mountain Range.[2] The Dajia River flows through the Taichung City districts of Heping, Xinshe, Dongshi, Shigang, Fengyuan, Houli, Shengang, Waipu, Dajia, Qingshui, and Da'an before emptying into the Taiwan Strait.[2]

The Deji Reservoir (德基水庫; Déjī Shuǐkù; "virtuous foundation reservoir"), formed by Techi Dam, is a 592-hectare reservoir in Dajia District.[3] The reservoir provides municipal water, generates hydroelectric power, is used for recreation and prevents flooding.[3] Techi and a cascade of five other dams on the Dajia produce up to 1,100 megawatts of hydroelectric power and generate more than 2.4 billion KWh per year.[4] The other five dams in sequence from top hill are Qingshan Dam, Kukuan Dam, Tienlun Dam, Ma'an Dam and Shihgang Dam.

Taiwan's Central Cross-Island Highway runs along the Dajia River from Heping to Dongshih. The Taichung Beltway begins in Fongyuan and follows the Dajia through into Cingshuei.

Incidents[edit]

The Dajia experiences frequent earthflows during typhoons and heavy rain, damaging homes and breaking up roads, sometimes permanently.[citation needed] In September 2008, rains from Typhoon Sinlaku resulted in storm-swollen waters which washed away supports for a section of Houfeng Bridge (which links Houli Township and Fengyuan City), leaving six people dead.[5] In June 2010, the bridge finally reopened to vehicular traffic after over NT$1.4 billion of reconstruction work.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philip Diller. "Taiwan Rivers and Watersheds". Retrieved 2007-11-30. 
  2. ^ a b "大安大甲流域(Da-an/Dajia River Basin)" (in Chinese). Retrieved 2007-11-30. 
  3. ^ a b "德基水庫(Techi Reservoir)" (in Chinese). National Taiwan Ocean University Water Resource Management Center. Retrieved 2007-11-30. 
  4. ^ 大甲溪 (PDF) (in Chinese). Taiwan Water Resources Agency. 2009-01-22. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-08-15. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  5. ^ "Typhoon wreaks havoc during festival". Taiwan Today. 2008-09-19. Retrieved 2010-07-10. 
  6. ^ "Traffic resumes on Taichung's Houfeng Bridge". The China Post. 2010-06-30. Retrieved 2010-07-10. 

Coordinates: 24°20′00″N 120°33′23″E / 24.3333°N 120.5564°E / 24.3333; 120.5564