Dalang, Sudan

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Dilling

[ˈdɪlɪŋ]

Dalang, Dalanj
Dilling is located in Sudan
Dilling
Dilling
Location in Sudan
Coordinates: 12°02′45″N 29°39′04″E / 12.045941°N 29.651048°E / 12.045941; 29.651048Coordinates: 12°02′45″N 29°39′04″E / 12.045941°N 29.651048°E / 12.045941; 29.651048
CountryFlag of Sudan.svg Sudan
StateSouth Kurdufan
Population
 (2008)
 • Total59,089

Dalang (Arabic الدلنج al-Dalanj) or Dilling is a town in South Kordofan State in Sudan, north of the state capital Kadugli. As of 2008 it had a population 59,089 people.[1] In printed sources and internet sources, including maps and atlases, the town's name is usually spelled as Dilling,[2] reflecting the local pronunciation [ˈdɪlɪŋ]. The spellings Dalang and Dalanj reflect a pronunciation adapted to the phonotactics of Arabic.

Geography[edit]

Dilling is located about 160 kilometres (99 mi) south of El Obeid, the state capital of North Kordofan State. The town has a lake in the northeastern part of the same name. An asphalted road links Dilling to Khartoum via Kosti and El Obeid, and another all-season road links Dilling to Kadugli. There is a railway station in the north of the town on a branch line to Debeibat. Dilling Airport is to the southeast of the town.[3]

Demography[edit]

The town is inhabited mainly by Nuba (especially the Nyimang), Fellata, and Hawazma Arabs. The Nuba group from whom the town takes its name, the Dilling, now constitute only a small minority of the population.

Economy[edit]

The main economic activity is trade. Other citizens work for the government, are engaged in agriculture or cattle breeding, or work on leather or metal work crafts. Dilling is the home of Dilling University.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sudan". Citypopulation.de. Retrieved 14 November 2013.
  2. ^ The spelling Dilling is used, among other sources, by The Times Atlas of the World.
  3. ^ a b "The Evolution and Establishment of the University". University of Dalanj. Archived from the original on 25 January 2012. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  4. ^ LULAT, G-M G-M (30 August 2005). A History of African Higher Education from Antiquity to the Present: A Critical Synthesis. ABC-CLIO. p. 166. ISBN 978-0-313-06866-9.