Damien Gaspar

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Damien Gaspar
Personal information
Full name Damien Gaspar
Date of birth (1975-03-28) 28 March 1975 (age 42)
Original team(s) South Fremantle, (WAFL)
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1993–1998 Melbourne 29 (0)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1998.
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Damien Gaspar (born 28 March 1975) is a former Australian rules footballer who played with Melbourne in the Australian Football League (AFL).

Melbourne selected Gaspar in the 1992 AFL Draft from South Fremantle in the West Australian Football League (WAFL) with the 86th overall selection. He made his debut in 1995 and played in eight games for Melbourne in each of his first two seasons. He played the first twelve games of 1997, but then succumbed to a groin injury and only played one more AFL game in 1998[1] before he was delisted at the end of the 1998 season.[2]

He returned to Western Australia, but switched WAFL clubs to play for East Fremantle,where he played 110 games over the next seven seasons.[3] He remained at East Fremantle after retiring as a player, becoming their football manager.[4]

His brother, Darren Gaspar, played in the AFL for Sydney and Richmond. It was suggested that Melbourne was considering recruiting Darren when he left Sydney in 1995,[5] but they selected Craig Nettlebeck with the second selection in the 1996 Pre-season Draft, leaving Richmond to select Darren with the next selection. Another brother, Travis Gaspar, played for South Fremantle and West Coast.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holmesby, Russell; Main, Jim (2002). The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers: every AFL/VFL player since 1897 (4th ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Crown Content. p. 222. ISBN 1-74095-001-1.
  2. ^ "Unhappy Rock parts with North". The Age. 24 October 1998. p. 19. 
  3. ^ WAFL statistics
  4. ^ a b "WAFL Whispers - Derby downturn dilemma". The West Australian. 5 August 2010. 
  5. ^ "Swans lure Demon Dyson with a three-year contract". The Age. 13 January 1996. 

External links[edit]