Dammaj

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Dammaj
دماج
Village
Dar Al-Hadeeth in Dammaj
Dar Al-Hadeeth in Dammaj
Dammaj is located in Yemen
Dammaj
Dammaj
Location in Yemen
Coordinates: 16°53′28.86″N 43°47′55.53″E / 16.8913500°N 43.7987583°E / 16.8913500; 43.7987583Coordinates: 16°53′28.86″N 43°47′55.53″E / 16.8913500°N 43.7987583°E / 16.8913500; 43.7987583
Country  Yemen
Administrative division Sa'dah Governorate
Government
 • Type Local
Population (2007)
 • Total 15,626
Time zone GMT+3
Climate BWh

Dammaj (Arabic: دماج‎) is a small town in the Sa'dah Governorate of north-western Yemen, southeast by road from Sa'dah in a valley of the same name.

Muqbil bin Hadi al-Wadi'i established the Madrasah Dar al-Hadith in Dammaj in 1979,[1] an important center of learning for Salafi Sunnis.[2][3] Terrorism and extreme views about Islam were both strictly forbidden in the Dar-al-hadith and has been criticized and warned against by the Madrasah leaders.[citation needed] In 2014 the non-local Sunnis, including all of the students there, were evicted.[4]

The town was at the epicenter of the Siege of Dammaj, and in November 2013, further sectarian violence between militants of the Houthi-led Shia movement and Sunni Salafists erupted in the town, creating many casualties; some 50 had been killed by the start of the second week.[5][6] In one incident in late November a mine exploded as a military vehicle was passing by, killing two Yemeni soldiers.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Noor, Farish A.; Sikand, Yoginder; Bruinessen, Martin van (2008). The Madrasa in Asia: Political Activism and Transnational Linkages. Amsterdam University Press. p. 266. ISBN 978-90-5356-710-4. 
  2. ^ Cesari, Jocelyne (25 July 2013). Why the West Fears Islam: An Exploration of Muslims in Liberal Democracies. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 381. ISBN 978-1-137-25820-5. 
  3. ^ Mahoney, Richard D. (2004). Getting Away with Murder: The Real Story Behind American Taliban John Walker Lindh and what the U.S. Government Had to Hide. Arcade Publishing. p. 158. ISBN 978-1-55970-714-5. 
  4. ^ Al-Sakkaf, Nasser. "Non-local Salafis evicted from Dammaj" (Archived 2016-01-02 at WebCite). Yemen Times. 14 January 2014. Retrieved on 3 January 2016.
  5. ^ "Yemen: ICRC evacuates 44 severely wounded people from Dammaj". ICRC. 8 November 2013. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  6. ^ ""Catastrophic" humanitarian situation in Yemen's Dammaj". IRIN. 6 November 2013. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  7. ^ "Yemen soldiers killed despite rebel-Salafist truce". France24. 21 November 2013. Archived from the original on 22 November 2013. Retrieved 22 November 2013.