Dan Adler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Daniel Herbert Adler
Born (1963-04-09) April 9, 1963 (age 52)
Cleveland, Ohio
Ethnicity Jewish
Occupation Entertainment executive
Spouse(s) Jenna Adler
Children Eli Adler
Jakob Adler

Daniel Herbert "Dan" Adler (born April 9, 1963) is a Los Angeles entertainment industry veteran of the new media and Hollywood film and television industries.[1] He was a Democratic candidate for the United States House of Representatives in the special election to fill California's 36th Congressional District seat.[2] He was eliminated from running in the runoff election since he came in behind Democrat Janice Hahn and Republican Craig Huey. He has served executive positions at the Walt Disney Company, CAA, and the Convex Group. He currently runs the consulting firm Media Eagles.

Early life and career[edit]

Adler was born to a Jewish family[3] in Cleveland, Ohio on April 9, 1963. In 1986 Adler was hired by the Creative Artists Agency (CAA), starting in the mailroom before later became an executive there.[1] He left CAA in 1995 to join The Walt Disney Company as Vice President of Talent and Business Development of Disney Interactive, later becoming the Vice President of Disney Imagineering. [4] He rejoined CAA at the heart of the dot-com boom to rebuild and run the New Media division, quickly building and leading a 20 person department.

In 2003, Adler left CAA and became Chief Strategic Officer of The Convex Group, a media network and entertainment company.[5] In 2005 Adler founded the media consultancy firm Media Eagles, working with a wide range of global and Hollywood clients.[6] Adler was founder and CEO of Fanista, which produced "Burma: It Can’t Wait".[7][8]

Public service[edit]

Adler serves on the boards of directors of Ryman Arts, the Israel Policy Forum, and the Aleph Society. He is on the boards of advisors of Declare Yourself, the Human Rights Action Center, and the Harvard School of Public Health's Center for Health Communication. He is on the National Leadership Council of Communities In Schools, the President’s Advisory Board of the Zimmer Children’s Museum, the Emeritus Board of Teach For America/LA, and the Council of the REDCAT Theater. He is a member of the American Jewish Committee's National Board of Governors, a member of the board on the California Film Commission, and is a Wexner Heritage Foundation Fellow. California Film Commission.[9]

Policy initiatives[edit]

In 2008 Adler produced and helped to fund 38 short films in connection with the U.S. Campaign for Burma called “Burma: It Can’t Wait”. [10] The campaign supported the people of Burma and the release of Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi.[11]

Adler is an investor of Causes.com,[12] which bills itself as "the world’s largest platform for activism and philanthropy", and claims to have raised over $30M for more than 25,000 non-profit organizations.[13]

The Beitar Jerusalem F.C. matter[edit]

On July 14, 2011, Israeli media reported that an entity owned by Adler and U.S.-based businessman Adam Levin had signed an agreement in principle to buy the ownership of the struggling Beitar Jerusalem F.C. from Arcadi Gaydamak. On July 17, 2011, Adler and Levin visited Beitar's training ground for the first time, and decided to join the team's players on their warm-up run. During this visit, Adler and Levin expressed their hope that they could aid the financially troubled team and turn it around.[citation needed]

Following legal wrangling in Israel by parties unrelated to Adler or Levin, however, on July 28, 2011, it was announced that Adler and Levin would not be closing on the transaction. Certain members of the Israeli press blamed Adler and Levin for the failed deal; others blamed the league and the sellers. Neither Adler nor Levin made any press announcement regarding the reasons for the failure of the transaction to close, although representatives of Beitar were not so circumspect and have attempted to blame Adler and Levin in the press for the team's continuing financial woes.[citation needed]

Adler is a supporter of the Two state solution in Israel.[3]


Adler and his wife Jenna, a CAA Music agent, have two sons, Eli (b. 2000), and Jakob, (b. 2002). They live in Los Angeles, California.

Adler's father was Auschwitz survivor Mayer Michael Adler.[14]


  1. ^ a b "Entertainment; Hollywood Agents' New Role: They're Silicon Valley Guys - New York Times". Nytimes.com. 2000-09-20. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  2. ^ "Democratic hopefuls seek party's backing". The Daily Breeze. 2010-03-09. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  3. ^ a b Israel Policy Forum: "negotiated resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict based on two states for two peoples" February 12, 2014
  4. ^ http://www.dauntlessllc.com/da_bio.htm
  5. ^ "Dan Adler, Navio Advisory Board Member, Navio Systems Inc". Spoke. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  6. ^ "Interview with Fanista founder Dan Adler // Social Media Marketing Agency". Firebelly Marketing. 2008-01-09. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  7. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (2004-03-29). "A Web Refugee Turns to Music and Says, and #146 - The Sky and #146 - s the Lid and #146". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  8. ^ Adler, Dan (2008-05-01). "Organize now against oppression in Burma | Opinion". Jewish Journal. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  9. ^ "Democrat Dan Adler Files to Run in California's 36th Congressional District Special Election". Business Insider. March 30, 2011. Retrieved May 16, 2011. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Campaign for Burma - YouTube videos". 
  11. ^ "Democrat Dan Adler Files to Run in California's 36th Congressional District Special Election". newsblaze.com. March 30, 2011. Retrieved May 16, 2011. 
  12. ^ Causes.com - Investors - Dan Adler
  13. ^ Causes.com - about
  14. ^ "Jews Get the Last Word as Tarantino’s ‘Inglourious Basterds’ Rewrites History". The Jewish Journal. March 3, 2010. Retrieved May 16, 2011. 

External links[edit]