D. G. Chichester

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D.G. Chichester
Born Daniel G. Chichester
(1964-08-22) August 22, 1964 (age 52)
Connecticut
Nationality American
Area(s) Writer, Editor
Notable works
Daredevil
Terror Inc.

Daniel G. Chichester (born August 22, 1964)[1] is an American comic book writer. His credits include Daredevil and Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. for Marvel Comics.

Career[edit]

D. G. Chichester was born in Connecticut,[2] and studied filmmaking at New York University.[2] In his junior year, after running through cash reserves on his narrative student film, he took a job as assistant to the assistant of editor in chief Jim Shooter.[3] This led to an editorial job at the Marvel Comics imprint Epic Comics following his graduation.[3] Working as an assistant editor from 1985 to 1986, he was promoted to editor in 1987. Chichester worked in that capacity at Epic until 1989[4] he left Marvel's staff that year to pursue freelance writing and editing full-time.

Beginning in 1987, Chichester added to his editorial role and began writing comics for Marvel — and, after leaving staff, for other publishers. His credits include Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. in 1990–1992, and Nightstalkers in 1992-1993. He had a long run on Daredevil from 1991 to 1995, where he scripted the "Fall of the Kingpin"[5] and "Fall From Grace"[6] story arcs. Additional freelance credits from this period include Charlemagne #1–5 for Defiant Comics and Motorhead #1–6 for Dark Horse Comics.

In early 1995, while in the midst of developing upcoming story lines for Daredevil, he learned he was to be replaced by group editor Bobbie Chase as the title's writer. For the five issues of the comic he was obligated to write he took his name off the credits, instead demanding an "Alan Smithee" credit[7] (an official pseudonym used by film directors who wish to disown a project). Despite being fired from the title, Chichester was later given the opportunity to write the 1997 Daredevil/Batman intercompany crossover, "An Eye for an Eye", and accepted.

Chichester has had no major comics writing credits since 1999, the same year he joined the ad agency Ogilvy & Mather as an associate creative director. He is currently the Chief Digital Officer for the Healthworld group at the company.

He lives in his native Connecticut with his wife and son, continuing to experiment with moviemaking and animation.[2]

Bibliography[edit]

Acclaim Comics[edit]

Dark Horse Comics[edit]

DC Comics[edit]

Marvel Comics[edit]

Epic Comics[edit]

Marvel and DC[edit]

Other publishers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miller, John Jackson (June 10, 2005). "Comics Industry Birthdays". Comics Buyer's Guide. Iola, Wisconsin. Archived from the original on October 30, 2010. Retrieved December 12, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c Chichester, D. G. (2010). "Pro Stuff". CapitalistFiction.com. Archived from the original on March 8, 2012. Retrieved July 5, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Mithra, Kuljit (February 1998). "Interview With D.G. Chichester". Manwithoutfear.com. Archived from the original on October 11, 2006. 
  4. ^ Bails, Jerry (2006). "Chichester, Dan". Who's Who of American Comic Books 1928–1999. Archived from the original on March 9, 2014. 
  5. ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2008). "1990s". Marvel Chronicle A Year by Year History. London, United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. p. 258. ISBN 978-0756641238. Culminating in the anniversary 300th issue, Daredevil would finally gain the upper hand against longtime foe Wilson Fisk (the Kingpin) in this moody tale by writer D. G. Chichester and penciller Lee Weeks. 
  6. ^ Manning "1990s" in Gilbert (2008), p. 263: "The seven-part 'Fall From Grace' epic storyline began in issue #319 of Daredevil...[and] was written by D. G. Chichester, with art by Scott McDaniel."
  7. ^ Cronin, Brian (July 28, 2005). "Comic Book Urban Legends Revealed #9!". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 22, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Ann Nocenti
Daredevil writer
1991–1995
Succeeded by
J. M. DeMatteis
Preceded by
Scott Lobdell
Daredevil writer
1998
Succeeded by
Kevin Smith