Dan Currie

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Dan Currie
No. 58
Position: Linebacker
Personal information
Born: (1935-06-27)June 27, 1935
Detroit, Michigan
Died: September 11, 2017(2017-09-11) (aged 82)
Las Vegas, Nevada
Height: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight: 235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school: Detroit (MI) St. Anthony
College: Michigan State
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions: 11
INT yards: 193
Fumble recoveries: 7
Games played: 118
Player stats at NFL.com

Daniel George Currie (June 27, 1935 – September 11, 2017) was an American football player, a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons, with the Green Bay Packers and Los Angeles Rams.[2]

Early years[edit]

Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, Currie played college football at Michigan State and was an All-American linebacker and center as a senior in 1957.[3][4][5]

Playing career[edit]

Currie was the third overall selection of the 1958 NFL draft, the first pick of the Packers.[6][7] In that draft, the Packers also selected Jim Taylor of LSU (2nd round, 15th overall), Ray Nitschke of Illinois (3rd round, 36th), and Jerry Kramer of Idaho (4th round, 39th).[6][8]

In his rookie season in 1958 under first-year head coach Scooter McLean, the Packers were a league worst 1–10–1 and hired Vince Lombardi as head coach in January 1959. Green Bay went 7–5 that season and then were in three consecutive NFL title games; they lost to Philadelphia in 1960 and won in 1961 and 1962, both over the New York Giants. Currie was an All-Pro in 1962, one of ten Packers on the 22-man Associated Press team,[1] and was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated in December 1961.[9]

After seven seasons in Green Bay, Currie was traded to the Rams in April 1965 for receiver Carroll Dale.[10][11][12] He played two years for Los Angeles, then missed the final cut in September 1967 season at age 32.[13]

After football[edit]

Currie was later a defensive coach at Milton College in Wisconsin,[14] which closed in 1982. He moved to Las Vegas in the early 1980s and worked in casino security.[2][15] On September 11, 2017, Currie died in Las Vegas at the age of 82.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Green Bay places 10 on All-Pro, 4 Giants picked". Florence Times. Alabama. Associated Press. December 12, 1962. p. 3, section 4. 
  2. ^ a b Reischel, Rob (December 18, 2003). "One a star, Dan Currie's still a fan". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved February 26, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Eight All-Americans on North roster for Senior Bowl". Tuscaloosa News. Alabama. Associated Press. December 13, 1957. p. 8. 
  4. ^ Lea, Bud (March 27, 1960). "Pro gridders are made, not born". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 3, sports. 
  5. ^ Couch, Graham (July 7, 2015). "MSU's top 50 football players: No. 32 Dan Currie". Lansing State Journal. Michigan. Retrieved February 26, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Johnson, Chuck (December 3, 1957). "Why Currie? He is tops, Packer say". Milwaukee Journal. p. 19. 
  7. ^ Lea, Bud (December 3, 1957). "Liz drafts Currie top Big 10 center". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 4, part 2. 
  8. ^ Wolf, Bob (May 3, 1979). "Packers' 1958 draft may have been greatest ever". Milwaukee Journal. p. 3, part 3. 
  9. ^ Maule, Tex (December 18, 1961). "Green Bay: a corner on defense". Sports Illustrated. p. 28. 
  10. ^ Lea, Bud (April 14, 1965). "Vince trades Currie for Rams' end Dale". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 2, part 2. 
  11. ^ "Green Bay, L.A. swap gridders". Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah. UPI. April 14, 1965. p. B-5. 
  12. ^ "Green Bay trades Currie for Dale". Spartanburg Herald. South Carolina. Associated Press. April 14, 1965. p. 20. 
  13. ^ "Currie, Fortunato cut as pros trim rosters". Milwaukee Journal. wire services. September 7, 1967. p. 11, part 2. 
  14. ^ "Currie to coach at Milton". Milwaukee Sentinel. wire services. March 22, 1973. p. 1, part 2. 
  15. ^ "What happened to...Dan Currie?". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. November 26, 2003. p. 2C. 
  16. ^ "Former Packers linebacker Dan Currie dies at 82". Retrieved 2017-09-14. 

External links[edit]