Dan Frishberg

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Daniel Frishberg
Born Staten Island, New York City, New York, US
Employer Frishberg Media LLC
Title Financial Advisor
Spouse(s) Elisea
Children 3

Daniel Sholom Frishberg is an American businessman, author[citation needed] and podcast host. Since 2009, he has been the focus of a series of lawsuits concerning his relationship with his clients and allegations of fraud in the sales of worthless promissory notes to his clients to fund the failed purchase of a radio station in Houston, Texas.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Career[edit]

Frishberg's program, The MoneyMan Report, features Frishberg's comments and analysis, is heard in the morning on South Florida radio, and is followed online via a podcast. He spent a few years as a commentator on CNBC's Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo, the Fox News Channel, and Fox Business with Neil Cavuto. Frishberg is the author of two books, Escape from the Herd, and Investing without Borders.

Securities and Exchange Commission sanctions[edit]

Frishberg was the president and majority owner of Daniel Frishberg Financial Services, Inc. d/b/a DFFS Capital Management, Inc. (“DFFS”), an investment adviser registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).[3] While living in Houston, Frishberg attempted to purchase a local radio station. On March 25, 2011, the SEC filed a complaint against Frishberg, charging him with violating various SEC rules.[4] DFFS was not financially strong enough to support the purchase of the radio station.[4][3] DFFS offered promissory notes to potential investors, who were also advisory clients of Frishberg.[3] Frishberg violated SEC rules by recommending unsuitable investments to his advisory clients.[3] Frishberg was alleged to have approved investments despite conflicts of interest between himself and DFFS and the advisory clients.[3] Frishberg controlled the company that issued the promissory notes.[3] DFFS’s poor financial condition made it unlikely that DFFS could pay its promissory-note obligations.[3] The SEC concluded that Frishberg knew that the conflicts had not been disclosed to his clients or that he simply disregarded whether they had been warned of the conflicts.[3] The SEC ordered that Frishberg be permanently barred from associating with any broker, dealer, investment adviser, municipal securities dealer, or transfer agent.[3]

SEC lawsuit against Frishberg for equitable relief[edit]

On November 13, 2009, the SEC sued Frishberg for $10 million to force Frishberg to disgorge the monies he received from selling the worthless promissory notes used to purchase to purchase Houston station KTEK 1110 AM for $7.75 million.[2] The SEC also sued Frishberg's partner, Albert Kaleta and Kaleta Capital Management, Inc.[1] The SEC charged that Kaleta had used $1.5 million of the monies to pay personal debts.[1] Former Sugar Land, Texas mayor David Wallace was an investor in the promissory notes.[2] The SEC focused upon Frishberg to exact the whole amount of money that was fraudulently taken.[1]

Court-appointed receiver for Kaleta Capital Management, Inc. lawsuit against Frishberg[edit]

On August 23, 2011, Thomas L. Taylor, III, the court-appointed receiver for Kaleta Capital Management, Inc., and DFFS, sued Frishberg and his wife to recapture and return to investors those funds which were invested in promissory-note securities made by Kaleta and Frishberg and fraudulently offered to the public.[5] Taylor also sued Barrington Financial Advisors (a company that took control of the radio station after the promissory note fraud came to light) and William Heath, the principal of Barrington, Kaleta and Frishberg. Taylor alleged fraud in the transfer of the radio station assets to Barrington Advisors to defeat the claims of investors and creditors.[5] Frishberg was paid from Barrington for these DFFS assets and Barrington allegedly profited from their transfer.[6] Frishberg has a fiduciary duty not to sell those assets without sharing the proceeds with his investors.[6]

The court-appointed receiver, Taylor, obtained some of the money fraudulently obtained through the promissory notes. Specifically, the Receiver has obtained repayment of certain notes in the following amounts: $122,069 from Frishberg and $92,348 from former Sugar Land Mayor David G. Wallace.[6] These two men took personal loans from the proceeds of the promissory notes and the court ordered their repayment.[6]

David Wallace and his partner Costa Bajjali own interests in various companies collectively known as the Wallace Bajjali affiliated entities. Wallace Bajjali borrowed $1,177,755.[6] The Receiver obtained a settlement with Wallace Bajjali to repay the total amount borrowed from the promissory note proceeds.[6] Wallace Bajjali also agreed to release the receivership estate of any claims that the Wallace Bajjali affiliated entities might have against the radio station.[6]

State of Texas censure[edit]

In 2006, Frishberg was censured by the Texas State Securities Board for failing to register with the Texas Securities Commissioner, for not filing Form U-4 information, and for working as an investment advisor with unregistered agents. He was fined $2,500 and was required to register with the state of Texas.[10]

2011 settlement by Frishberg with SEC[edit]

Frishberg settled the SEC complaints on March 25, 2011 by paying a $65,000 penalty and by agreeing to being barred from association with any investment advisor.[11][9][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION, Plaintiff v. ALBERT FASE KALETA and KALETA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, INC., Defendants, and BUSINESSRADIO NETWORK, L.P. d/b/a BIZRADIO and DANIEL FRISHBERG FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. d/b/a DFFS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, INC., Relief Defendants, Solely for the Purposes of Equitable Relief." (PDF). SEC. November 13, 2009. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "SEC sues Missouri City businessman for alleged $10 million fraud". Fort Bend Independent. November 2009. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (May 16, 2011). "In the Matter of DANIEL SHOLOM FRISHBERG, Respondent, ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDING File No. 3-14393" (PDF). Retrieved 9 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION, Plaintiff v. DANIEL SHOLOM FRISHBERG, Defendant, Civil Action No.: 4:11-cv-1097" (PDF). IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS HOUSTON DIVISION. March 25, 2011. Retrieved 9 March 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "THOMAS L. TAYLOR, III, SOLELY IN HIS CAPACITY AS COURT-APPOINTED RECEIVER FOR KALETA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, INC., BUSINESSRADIO NETWORK, L.P. d/b/a BizRadio and DANIEL FRISHBERG FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., d/b/a DFFS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, INC., Plaintiff, v. DANIEL S. FRISHBERG, ELISEA T. FRISHBERG, ALBERT F. KALETA, BARRINGTON FINANCIAL ADVISORS, IN C., and WILLIAM C. HEATH, Defendants." (PDF). IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS HOUSTON DIVISION. August 23, 2011. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "STATUS REPORT OF THE RECEIVER DATED FEBRUARY 25, 2013" (PDF). SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION, Plaintiff, v. ALBERT FASE KALETA and KALETA CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, INC., Defendants, and BUSINESSRADIO NETWORK, L.P., d/b/a BizRadio and DANIEL FRISHBERG FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., d/b/a DFFS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT, INC., Relief Defendants, Solely for the purposes of Equitable Relief. February 25, 2013. Retrieved 11 March 2013. 
  7. ^ Langford, Cameron. Investors Say Supply Sider Arthur Laffer Backed a Ponzi, Courthouse News Service, January 11, 2012.
  8. ^ a b Mercado, Darla. SEC hits radio personality with fraud charges: Houston's 'MoneyMan' Daniel Frishberg accepts $65,000 penalty, is barred from advice business, InvestmentNews", April 10, 2011.
  9. ^ a b Heallen, Jeremy. Bogus Transfer Claim Settled In $10M Securities Fraud Case, Law360 (Dayton, Ohio), July 23, 2013.
  10. ^ Order, Texas State Securities Board, case no. IC06-CEN-30, Aug. 2, 2006.
  11. ^ Press Release 2011-72. SEC Charges Houston-Area Businessman and Talk Radio "MoneyMan" for Fraudulent Conduct at Advisory Firm, Securities & Exchange Commission (Washington, D.C.), March 25, 2011.

External links[edit]