Dana Stein

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Dana Stein
Stein in 2023
Speaker pro tempore of the Maryland House of Delegates
Nominee
Assuming office
January 10, 2024
SucceedingSheree Sample-Hughes
Member of the Maryland House of Delegates
Assumed office
January 10, 2007
Serving with Jon S. Cardin
Preceded byRobert Zirkin
ConstituencyDistrict 11 (2007–2023)
District 11B (2023–present)
In office
June 25, 2002 – January 8, 2003
Appointed byParris Glendening
Preceded byMichael Finifter
Succeeded byJon S. Cardin
ConstituencyDistrict 11
Personal details
Born
Dana Max Stein

(1958-09-19) September 19, 1958 (age 65)
Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
SpouseMargaret Presley
Children3
EducationHarvard University (BA)
Princeton University (MPA)
Columbia University (JD)
WebsiteCampaign website

Dana Max Stein (born September 19, 1958) is an American politician from Maryland and a member of the Democratic Party. He is a member of the Maryland House of Delegates, representing District 11B in Baltimore County.

Early life and education[edit]

Stein was born in Baltimore and attended public schools in Baltimore County, later graduating from Milford Mill High School. He later attended Harvard College, where he earned a B.A. degree in government, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs at Princeton University, where he earned a Master of Public Affairs degree, and Columbia University School of Law, where he earned a Juris Doctor degree in 1985.[1]

After graduating, Stein worked as an attorney for the Washington, D.C.-based law firm Squire, Sanders & Dempsey until 1992,[1] when he founded Grassroots Recycling, a local recycling group.[2] Later that year, he and eventual Maryland lieutenant governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend founded Civic Works,[3] a nonprofit organization that supported Baltimore-based urban service projects,[4] including the restoration of the Clifton Mansion.[5]

Stein first became involved in politics in 1994, when he unsuccessfully ran for the Baltimore County Council in District 2, challenging incumbent councilmember Kevin Kamenetz.[6] In 1996, he became the president of the Baltimore County Central Committee. Stein was later the committee's treasurer from 1996 to 2002 and its chair from 2001 to 2002.[1]

In the legislature[edit]

Stein in 2007

In May 2002, following Governor Parris Glendening's appointment of state delegate Michael Finifter to the Baltimore County Circuit Court, he applied to serve the remainder of Finifter's term in the Maryland House of Delegates.[7] The Baltimore County Central Committee voted to nominate Stein in June,[8] and he was appointed by Glendening and sworn in on June 25, 2002.[1] Stein ran for a full term in the 2002 Maryland House of Delegates election,[9] in which he was defeated in the Democratic primary by Jon S. Cardin.[10]

In 2006, Stein ran for the Maryland House of Delegates, seeking to succeed state delegate Robert Zirkin, who ran for the Maryland Senate.[11][12] He won the general election on November 8,[13] and was sworn in on January 10, 2007.[1] In 2022, Stein was redrawn into District 11B, in which he ran for re-election.[14]

Stein was the deputy majority whip from 2011 to 2015.[1] In May 2023, the house speaker, Adrienne A. Jones, nominated Stein to be speaker pro tempore of the Maryland House of Delegates, succeeding Sheree Sample-Hughes.[15]

Committee assignments[edit]

[1]

  • Vice-Chair, Environment and Transportation Committee, 2015–present (local government & bi-county agencies subcommittee, 2015–2018; motor vehicle & transportation subcommittee, 2015–2019; chair, natural resources, agriculture & open space subcommittee, 2015–2019, member, 2020–present; chair, environment subcommittee, 2020–present)
  • Joint Subcommittee on Program Open Space and Agricultural Land Preservation, 2011–present
  • Rules and Executive Nominations Committee, 2015–present
  • House Chair, Joint Committee on the Chesapeake and Atlantic Coastal Bays Critical Area, 2015–present
  • Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, 2022–present
  • Ways and Means Committee, 2002–2003 (finance resources subcommittee, 2002–2003)
  • Environmental Matters Committee, 2007–2015 (ground rent work group, 2007; local government & bi-county subcommittee, 2007–2009; land use & ethics subcommittee, 2007–2010; motor vehicles & transportation subcommittee, 2007–2015; environment subcommittee, 2008–2012; housing & real property subcommittee, 2013-15)

Political positions[edit]

Agriculture[edit]

During the 2018 legislative session, Stein introduced legislation to ban the use of chlorpyrifos, a harmful pesticide used on food crops. The bill was watered down to a bill to study banning the pesticide amid concerns over a possible spotted lanternfly invasion.[16] He reintroduced the chlorpyrifos ban in 2020,[17] during which it passed, but was vetoed by Governor Hogan.[18]

During the 2019 legislative session, Stein introduced legislation to prohibit hemp farming in residential areas. The bills were voted down in committee.[19]

Environment[edit]

During the 2011 legislative session, Stein introduced legislation that would enforce the International Green Construction Code on all commercial buildings taller than three stories. The bill passed and was signed into law by Governor Martin O'Malley.[20]

During the 2015 legislative session, after Governor Larry Hogan revoked a Maryland Department of the Environment rule to regulate nitrogen oxide emissions in the state, Stein introduced a bill to codify the regulations into law.[21]

During the 2018 legislative session, Stein introduced a bill to require the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Department of Transportation to develop a plan to address the impact of sea level rise on state and local projects by July 2019. The bill passed and was signed into law by Governor Hogan.[22] In 2019, he introduced legislation to push back the deadline to October 2020, and required all jurisdictions that regularly flood during high tide to come up with sea level rise plans, which passed and was signed into law by Governor Hogan.[23] During the 2022 legislative session, Stein introduced legislation that would assign "environmental justice scores" to permits issued by the Maryland Department of the Environment.[24]

Also in 2018, Stein introduced legislation that would prohibit Maryland from withdrawing from the Paris Agreement without the legislature's approval.[25]

In 2021, Stein introduced the Climate Solutions Now Act, a sweeping environment reform bill that would increase the state's goal of cutting carbon emissions from a 40 percent reduction from its 2006 levels to a 60 percent cut by 2030.[26] The bill failed to pass after negotiations between the House and Senate broke down in the final weeks of the legislative session.[27] Stein reintroduced the bill during the 2022 legislative session,[28] during which it passed and became law without Governor Hogan's signature.[29]

In September 2022, Stein co-signed a letter to U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm in support of a proposal rule that would increase the efficiency level of gas furnaces to 95% Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency.[30]

In January 2023, Stein testified in support of the Bring Your Own Bag Act in Baltimore County, which would ban grocery stores from using plastic bags.[31]

Gun control[edit]

During the 2021 legislative session, Stein introduced "Jaelynn's Law", which would require guns to be safely stored and inaccessible for children below the age of 18. The bill was named for 16-year-old Jaelynn Willey, who was fatally shot in 2018 by a boy who had his father's Glock.[32]

Health care[edit]

During his 2006 House of Delegates campaign, Stein said he supported universal health care.[11]

Immigration[edit]

During the 2021 legislative session, Stein introduced the Maryland Driver Privacy Act, which would prohibit federal agencies from accessing state databases unless it had a warrant and blocked the state from providing agencies with photos of individuals for immigration investigations. The bill passed, but was vetoed by Governor Larry Hogan.[33] The Maryland General Assembly overrode Hogan's veto during the special legislative session later that year.[34]

Social issues[edit]

As executive director of Civic Works, Stein supported the passage of National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993, which created and provided funding for AmeriCorps.[35]

During his 2006 House of Delegates campaign, Stein said he supported legislation to encourage competition in the energy industry.[11]

During the 2012 legislative session, Stein introduced legislation that would require the Maryland State Police to compile a list of people convicted of animal abuse or neglect.[36]

In 2013, Stein introduced legislation that would require girls lacrosse players to wear protective headgear.[37]

In July 2020, Stein cosigned a letter calling on Governor Larry Hogan to extend the state's COVID-19 pandemic eviction moratorium, which was set to expire at the end of the month, until January 2021.[38]

During the 2021 legislative session, Stein introduced legislation that would ban "faithless electors" by requiring that the state's Electoral College members cast their votes for the candidate who won the majority of the vote.[39]

Taxes[edit]

In 2011, Stein introduced legislation to eliminate the state's tax break for bullion sales.[40]

During the 2017 legislative session, Stein introduced the Taxpayer Protection Act, which gave the Comptroller of Maryland's investigators the ability to enforce income tax fraud cases involving tobacco and motor fuel. The bill passed and was signed into law by Governor Hogan in May 2017.[41]

Personal life[edit]

Stein is married to his wife, Margaret Presley-Stein.[42] Together, they have three children and live in Pikesville, Maryland.[4]

Electoral history[edit]

Maryland House of Delegates District 11 Democratic primary election, 2002[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Zirkin (incumbent) 10,198 22.9
Democratic Dan K. Morhaim (incumbent) 7,922 17.8
Democratic Jon S. Cardin 7,776 17.4
Democratic Dana Stein (incumbent) 6,576 14.8
Democratic Melvin Mintz 6,311 14.2
Democratic Theodore Levin 3,349 7.5
Democratic Barney J. Wilson 2,438 5.5
Maryland House of Delegates District 11 Democratic primary election, 2006[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon S. Cardin (incumbent) 11,815 22.5
Democratic Dan K. Morhaim (incumbent) 10,146 19.3
Democratic Dana Stein 6,824 13.0
Democratic Rick Yaffe 6,634 12.6
Democratic Sharon H. Bloom 4,436 8.4
Democratic Jason A. Frank 3,300 6.3
Democratic Julian Earl Jones 3,291 6.3
Democratic Theodore Levin 2,271 4.3
Democratic Noel Levy 1,075 2.0
Democratic Stephen Knable 979 1.9
Democratic Zhanna Anapolsky-Maydanich 672 1.3
Democratic V. Michael Koyfman 526 1.0
Maryland House of Delegates District 11 election, 2006[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon S. Cardin (incumbent) 32,747 25.8
Democratic Dan K. Morhaim (incumbent) 31,185 24.6
Democratic Dana Stein 30,481 24.0
Republican Patrick Abbondandolo 12,822 10.1
Green Dave Goldsmith 5,435 4.3
Write-in 181 0.1
Maryland House of Delegates District 11 election, 2010[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon Cardin (incumbent) 32,211 24.3
Democratic Dan K. Morhaim (incumbent) 28,129 21.2
Democratic Dana Stein (incumbent) 28,034 21.2
Republican J. Michael Collins 13,971 10.6
Republican Carol C. Byrd 13,952 10.5
Republican Steven J. Smith 13,647 10.3
Libertarian Brandon Brooks 2,341 1.8
Write-in 115 0.1
Maryland House of Delegates District 11 election, 2014[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shelly L. Hettleman 24,197 27.6
Democratic Dana M. Stein (incumbent) 23,241 26.5
Democratic Dan Morhaim (incumbent) 22,991 26.2
Republican Laura Harkins 16,947 19.3
Write-in 308 0.4
Maryland House of Delegates District 11 election, 2018[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon S. Cardin (incumbent) 33,077 29.3
Democratic Shelly Hettleman (incumbent) 31,957 28.3
Democratic Dana Stein (incumbent) 30,364 26.9
Republican Jonathan Porter 16,852 14.9
Write-in 521 0.5
Maryland House of Delegates District 11B election, 2022[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon S. Cardin (incumbent) 22,115 34.9
Democratic Dana M. Stein (incumbent) 21,536 34.0
Republican Jim Simpson 10,640 16.8
Republican Tyler A. Stiff 9,072 14.3
Write-in 70 0.1

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Dana M. Stein, Maryland State Delegate". Maryland Manual On-Line. Maryland State Archives. January 19, 2023. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  2. ^ Karidis, Arlene (November 22, 2022). "Maryland Recycling Network's 31-Year Journey". Waste360. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  3. ^ "Eye on the Entrepreneur – A stirring of the heart". The Daily Record. June 2, 2004. Retrieved July 30, 2023.
  4. ^ a b Pryce, Meghan (June 25, 2017). "Five minutes with Dana Stein, executive director of Civic Works". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  5. ^ Pelton, Tom (October 9, 2002). "Preserving Hopkins history". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  6. ^ Gilbert, Pat (September 14, 1994). "Democrat Bartenfelder declares victory in Baltimore Co.'s 6th District PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS 1994". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 30, 2023.
  7. ^ Nitkin, David (May 21, 2002). "Lights, camera - Glendening". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  8. ^ Green, Andrew A. (June 8, 2002). "Balto. Co. Democrats to fill four vacancies in Assembly". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  9. ^ Green, Andrew A.; Piven, Ben (August 5, 2002). "New district lines lure dozens to vie for Balto. Co.'s House seats". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  10. ^ "State House Democratic primary results". The Baltimore Sun. September 11, 2002. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  11. ^ a b c Mitchell, Josh (November 3, 2006). "Delegate aims for state Senate in 11th District". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  12. ^ Desmon, Stephanie (November 3, 2006). "In swing district, a hunt for votes". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  13. ^ Barnhardt, Laura (November 8, 2006). "Sen. Brochin holds strong lead". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  14. ^ Leckrone, Bennett (January 17, 2022). "Analysis: The Consequential Changes in General Assembly's Redistricting Proposal". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  15. ^ Gaines, Danielle E. (May 17, 2023). "After committee chair's resignation, Speaker announces shakeup in House leadership". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  16. ^ Dance, Scott (March 15, 2018). "Fear of invasion by lanternflies kills Maryland bill to ban a pesticide". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  17. ^ Dance, Scott (February 20, 2020). "Hogan administration to 'phase out' harmful pesticide in Maryland, just as lawmakers prepare to advance a ban". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  18. ^ Pelton, Tom (August 26, 2021). "EPA Ban on Brain-Damaging Pesticide Follows Maryland's Lead". WYPR. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  19. ^ Nobles, Wilborn P. III (September 29, 2020). "Baltimore County Council considering restrictions on hemp farms". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  20. ^ Wheeler, Tim (May 10, 2011). "'Code Green' on construction in MD". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  21. ^ Wheeler, Timothy B. (March 12, 2015). "House panel weighs air pollution limits Hogan yanked". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  22. ^ San Felice, Selene (December 17, 2020). "Sea-level rise is 'the hidden threat' as Anne Arundel residents purchase waterfront homes". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  23. ^ Davis, Phil (September 21, 2020). "Maryland's mandate to address persistent flooding problems begins with this survey". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  24. ^ Gaskill, Hannah; Shwe, Elizabeth (March 18, 2022). "Legislative Roundup: Removing Health Officers, Calculating Environmental Justice Scores, Juvenile Justice Reform, and More". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  25. ^ Dance, Scott (January 10, 2018). "Maryland will join alliance of states supporting Paris climate agreement, Hogan says". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  26. ^ Condon, Christine (April 9, 2021). "Maryland lawmakers make deep cuts to key climate bill with end of legislative session looming". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  27. ^ Shwe, Elizabeth (April 20, 2021). "House-Senate Divisions Killed Climate Bill But It Should Have a Second Life in 2022". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  28. ^ Condon, Christine (February 10, 2022). "Maryland lawmakers are once again hoping to pass wide-ranging environmental legislation. Here's what's proposed". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  29. ^ DePuyt, Bruce; Gaines, Danielle E. (April 8, 2022). "Hogan Vetoes Abortion and Paid Family Leave Bills, Allows Climate Measure to Become Law". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  30. ^ Ford, William J.; Kurtz, Josh (September 8, 2022). "Political notes: Braveboy joining D.C. forum, a new bipartisan index, a new leader at MML, and more". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  31. ^ Russell, Lia (January 31, 2023). "Baltimore County residents testify about bill that would ban plastic bags in retail and food supply stores". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  32. ^ Jackson, Phillip (March 10, 2021). "Two Baltimore teens were playing with a parent's gun. Now, one is dead and the other is charged in his killing". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  33. ^ Wood, Pamela (May 26, 2021). "Maryland Gov. Hogan vetoes bills that would limit state's aid to federal immigration enforcement". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  34. ^ Gaskill, Hannah (December 5, 2021). "Legislature Prepares to Override Hogan's Vetoes During Special Session". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  35. ^ Schwartz, Nelson (September 22, 1993). "National service bill is signed Clinton invokes Roosevelt, Kennedy". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  36. ^ Wilson, Kandice C. (February 29, 2012). "Humane Society backs abuse registry". Carroll County Times. The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  37. ^ "US Lacrosse CEO says legislation on girls headgear is 'irresponsible'". The Baltimore Sun. February 13, 2013. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  38. ^ Davis, Phil (July 11, 2020). "Lawmakers call on Hogan to extend Maryland's eviction moratorium until Jan. 31". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  39. ^ Leckrone, Bennett (January 20, 2021). "Raft of Election Reform, Voting Access, Vacancy Filling Changes Proposed". Maryland Matters. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  40. ^ Sohr, Nicholas (January 19, 2012). "Coin show threatens to leave Baltimore over O'Malley budget". The Daily Record. Retrieved July 30, 2023.
  41. ^ Dresser, Michael (May 5, 2017). "Hogan signs bill to beef up comptroller's income tax enforcement powers". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  42. ^ Vozzella, Laura (March 23, 2011). "Deadbeat delegate hasn't paid water bill for 2 years". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  43. ^ "2002 Gubernatorial Election Official Results: Legislative District 11". Maryland State Board of Elections.
  44. ^ "Official 2006 Gubernatorial Primary Election results for Legislative District 11". Maryland State Board of Elections.
  45. ^ "Official 2006 Gubernatorial General Election results for Legislative District 11". Maryland State Board of Elections.
  46. ^ "Official 2010 Gubernatorial General Election results for House of Delegates". Maryland State Board of Elections.
  47. ^ "Official 2014 Gubernatorial General Election results for House of Delegates". Maryland State Board of Elections.
  48. ^ "Official 2018 Gubernatorial General Election results for House of Delegates". Maryland State Board of Elections.
  49. ^ "Official 2022 Gubernatorial General Election results for House of Delegates". Maryland State Board of Elections.

External links[edit]