Dance Notation Bureau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Dance Notation Bureau (DNB) is a non-profit organization founded to preserve choreographic works through notating dance scores in Labanotation and collaborating with dance companies to stage reconstructions of those works.[1] Based in New York City, DNB was founded by Helen Priest Rogers, Eve Gentry, Janey Price, and Ann Hutchinson in 1940.[2] It has significant holdings of videotapes, photographs, programs, and production information. Its mission is to advance the art of dance through the use of a system of notation called Labanotation. This allows the dances to be continue to be performed long after the lifetime of the artist.

In August 2007,[3] it commenced active work on the notation of dance works following a hiatus since October 2005.[4] The DNB is both privately and publicly funded, including the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts and has a $500,000 endowment.

The use of notation can support the performance of dances when interpreted with DNB assisting about 150 performances each year, including 20 under license from the choreographer or their heirs.

The DNB's Extension for Education and Research is at the Ohio State University.

Online Resources[edit]

The DNB released an online catalog of its Notated Theatrical Dances Collection, including works by George Balanchine, Paul Taylor, Antony Tudor, Bill T. Jones, Doris Humphrey, William Forsythe, José Limón and Laura Dean. In addition, the DNB is digitizing its Moving Images Collection as the supplement to the Notated Theatrical Dances Catalog. These clips are available at YouTube site.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cohen, Selma Jeanne (1998). Cohen, Selma Jeanne (ed.). International Encyclopedia of Dance. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195187632.
  2. ^ "Obituaries: Helen Priest Rogers, 85, Dance Authority". Back Stage - The Performing Arts Weekly. 40 (12): 50. 19–25 March 1999.
  3. ^ Roslyn Sulcas, All the Right Moves, New York Times, published August 30, 2007
  4. ^ Paul Ben-Itzak, The Buzz, 10-31: Nightmare on W. 30th Street: Dance Notation Bureau lays off staff, The Dance Insider, 2005

Further reading[edit]

  • Lu, Mei-Chen. "Resources and Riches: The Dance Notation Bureau." Dance Chronicle - Studies in Dance and the Related Arts 32.2 (2009): 291-301.
  • Lu, Mei-Chen. "The Dance Notation Bureau Costume Design Collection" Performing Arts Resources 27 (2010): 111-116.

External links[edit]