Danger! High Voltage

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"Danger! High Voltage"
ElectricSix Danger!HighVoltage.jpg
Single by Electric Six
from the album Fire
B-side "I Lost Control (Of My Rock and Roll)"
Released 2002 (2002)[a]
Format
Recorded 2000
Genre
Length 3:34
Label XL
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
  • Stuart Bradbury
  • Damien Mendis
Electric Six singles chronology
"Danger! High Voltage"
(2002)
"Gay Bar"
(2003)
"Danger! High Voltage"
(2003)
"Gay Bar"
(2003)

"Danger! High Voltage" is a song by American rock band Electric Six. It was released as the band's debut single and the lead single from their debut studio album, Fire (2003), in 2002 as a 7" vinyl. It was re-released by XL Recordings on January 6, 2003.[1] It was a number-one hit in Scotland and peaked at number 2 on the UK Singles Chart. It received positive reviews from critics and was named Single of the Week by the NME.

Background[edit]

Jack White of The White Stripes performed the secondary lead vocals on the track.[2] Members of the band have claimed in interviews that the singer was an auto mechanic named John S. O'Leary and not White,[3][4] although music critics suspected this name was a pseudonym for White.[5][6]

The song was originally recorded in early 2000,[7] when the band was under the name The Wildbunch. They were forced to drop this name following legal pressure from the Bristol trip hop collective of the same name.[8] The later album and single version was produced by British music producers, Damien Mendis and Stuart Bradbury—who also created 'club mixes' under the name of Soulchild.

Critical reception[edit]

The New York Times called the song "catchier than anything on the radio by the White Stripes."[9] The Guardian called it "insanely catchy", though "the archetypal comic novelty single."[10] Josh Tyrangiel with Time magazine also praised the track.[11] NME's Piers Martin wrote "[Electric Six] rustle up the sort of pop-party thrash which sounds like the idiot half-brother to The Rapture’s 'House Of Jealous Lovers'. That good."[12] The song is listed at #234 on the best songs of the 2000s by Pitchfork Media. It was also featured in The Pitchfork 500.[1] Writing for The Village Voice, Amy Phillips said, "The two men shout declarations of affection to each other over a sizzling Saturday Night Fever groove, and the sax sounds as if it's being played by someone with a long, luscious mullet. The video features taxidermy and a glowing codpiece."[13]

In other media[edit]

The song is also featured in films Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle and Diary of a Wimpy Kid. It was used in commercials for Subaru, the TV show Malcolm in the Middle, animated series The Simpsons and the video game Forza Motorsport 6.[14]

Music video[edit]

The video for this song was produced by Tom Kuntz and Mike Maguire and stars lead singer Dick Valentine and actress Tina Kanarek outfitted with a brightly flashing codpiece and bra, respectively, engaging in acts of lovemaking.

Track listings[edit]

CD1[edit]

  1. "Danger! High Voltage (Soulchild Radio Mix)"
  2. "I Lost Control (Of My Rock & Roll)"
  3. "Remote Control (Me)"

CD2[edit]

  1. "Danger! High Voltage (Soulchild 12" Blitz Mix)"
  2. "Danger! High Voltage (Thin White Duke Mix)"
  3. "Danger! High Voltage (Kilogram Mix)"

7"[edit]

  1. "Danger! High Voltage (original 7" mix)"
  2. "I Lost Control (Of My Rock & Roll)"

12"[edit]

  1. "Danger! High Voltage (Soulchild 12" Blitz Mix)"

Charts[edit]

Chart (2003) Peak
position
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[15] 41
Ireland (IRMA)[16] 15
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[17] 81
Scotland (Official Charts Company)[18] 1
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[19] 2

Legacy[edit]

  • The band performed the song in their live concert film "Absolute Treasure".

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Originally released in 2002, re-released on January 6, 2003.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Plagenhoef, Scott; Schreiber, Ryan, eds. (November 2008). The Pitchfork 500. Simon & Schuster. pp. 165–166. ISBN 978-1-4165-6202-3. 
  2. ^ "IN Interview: The Electric Six | inweekly". Inweekly.net. September 29, 2010. Archived from the original on March 13, 2012. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  3. ^ Ieg / Ecc. "Music From the Underground - Electric Six". antiMUSIC. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Electric Six Interview". Freewilliamsburg.com. Archived from the original on March 19, 2007. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  5. ^ Haag, Stephen. "Electric Six: Fire < PopMatters". Popmatters.com. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  6. ^ "5 Jack White projects you may not know about". AXS. June 23, 2014. 
  7. ^ Handyside, 2013, pg. 180
  8. ^ Handyside, 2013, pg. 183
  9. ^ Strauss, Neil (February 16, 2003). "MUSIC: SPINS; Burning Down the Garage". The New York Times. Retrieved on January 4, 2008
  10. ^ Petridis, Alexis (June 27, 2003), "Electric Six: Fire" The Guardian. Retrieved on January 4, 2008
  11. ^ Tyrangiel, Josh (June 2, 2003), "Brilliant Idiots". Time Retrieved on January 4, 2008
  12. ^ "Electric Six: Danger! High Voltage". New Music Express. January 7, 2003. Retrieved May 17, 2009. 
  13. ^ Amy Phillips. "Sax as a Weapon". Village Voice. 
  14. ^ "Xbox Celebrates a Legacy of Innovation in Forza Motorsport 6 TV Ad". Xbox Wire. Retrieved September 7, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Ultratop.be – Electric Six – Danger! High Voltage" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50.
  16. ^ "Chart Track: Week 4, 2003". Irish Singles Chart.
  17. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Electric Six – Danger! High Voltage" (in Dutch). Single Top 100.
  18. ^ "Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.
  19. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Handyside, Chris (2004). Fell in Love with a Band: The Story of The White Stripes. Location unknown:St. Martin's Griffin

External links[edit]