Daniel Killer

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Daniel Killer
Daniel Killer1.JPG
Personal information
Full name Daniel Pedro Killer
Date of birth (1949-12-21) 21 December 1949 (age 67)
Place of birth Rosario, Argentina
Playing position Defender
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1970–1976 Rosario Central 185 (18)
1977–1978 Racing Club 77 (4)
1979–1981 Newell's Old Boys 117 (3)
1982–1983 Vélez Sársfield 30 (0)
1984 Bucaramanga 8 (0)
1984 Estudiantes 4 (0)
1984–1986 Unión 45 (1)
1986–1987 Argentino (R) 0 (0)
National team
1975–1978 Argentina 22 (3)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Daniel Pedro Killer (born 21 December 1949 in Rosario) is a retired Argentine football defender who was part of the Argentina squad that won the 1978 FIFA World Cup.[1][2] Daniel and his brother Mario were part of the Rosario Central[3][4][5][6] team that won the Primera Division Argentina Nacional championship of 1973.

Killer started his career in 1970 with his home town club; Rosario Central where he was joined by his brother Mario in 1972.

Daniel's other clubs included Racing Club[7] Vélez Sársfield,[8] Estudiantes de Río Cuarto,[9][10][11] Unión[12] in Argentina. Killer also played for Rosario Central's fiercest local rivals, Newell's Old Boys.[13]

Daniel Killer also had a short spell in Colombia with Bucaramanga,[14][15] he finished his career in the lower leagues with Argentino de Rosario.[16][17]

He owns and manages a small indoor soccer complex on the west side of his hometown.

Honours[edit]

Club[edit]

Argentina Rosario Central

International[edit]

Argentina Argentina

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Argentina: World cup statistics". Prepared and maintained by Luis Carlos Storni for the Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 26 March 2001. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  2. ^ "Daniel Pedro Killer at National Football Teams". national-football-teams.com. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  3. ^ (in Spanish) "Killer: Un Canalla campeón del mundo". rosariocentral.com. 2 June 2014. Retrieved 8 March 2017. 
  4. ^ (in Spanish) "Club Atlético Rosario Central". rosariocentral.com. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  5. ^ (in Spanish) "Daniel Pedro Killer". arribacentral.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  6. ^ (in Spanish) "Daniel "Caballo" Killer". taringa.net. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  7. ^ (in Spanish) "Racing Club de Avellaneda". racingclub.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  8. ^ (in Spanish) "Club Atlético Vélez Sarsfield". velezsarsfield.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  9. ^ (in Spanish) "Asociación Atlética Estudiantes de Río Cuarto". aaestudiantes.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  10. ^ (in Spanish) "Asociación Atlética Estudiantes de Río Cuarto". paginaceleste.com.ar (web.archive.org). Archived from the original on 20 December 2014. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  11. ^ (in Spanish) "Estudiantes de Río Cuarto". paginaceleste.blogspot.com. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  12. ^ (in Spanish) "Sitio Oficial del Club Atlético Unión de Santa Fe". clubaunion.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  13. ^ (in Spanish) "Club Atlético Newell's Old Boys". newellsoldboys.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  14. ^ (in Spanish) "Atlético Bucaramanga". atleticobucaramanga.com.co. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  15. ^ "Atlético Bucaramanga". footballdatabase.eu. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  16. ^ (in Spanish) "Club Atlético Argentino de Rosario". argentinorosario.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  17. ^ (in Spanish) "Argentino de Rosario. El subcampeón que descendió". argentinorosario.com.ar. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  18. ^ "Campeonato Nacional 1971 (Nacional Championship)". Prepared and maintained by Pablo Ciullini for the Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 14 February 2007. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 
  19. ^ "Campeonato Nacional 1973 (Nacional Championship)". Prepared and maintained by Javier Roimiser for the Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 2 October 2005. Retrieved 10 March 2017. 

External links[edit]