Daniel Leab

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Daniel J. Leab
DanJLeab headshot 500pxl.png
Born Daniel Joseph Liebeskind
(1936-08-29)August 29, 1936
Berlin, Germany
Died November 15, 2016(2016-11-15) (aged 80)
in Washington, Connecticut
Nationality American
Other names Dan Leab
Alma mater Columbia University
Occupation Professor of history, publisher, author
Spouse(s) Katharine Kyes
Children Abigail Leab Martin, Constance Rigney, Marcus Leab
Parent(s) Herta Marcus, Leo Liebeskind

Daniel Joseph Leab (August 29, 1936 – November 15, 2016) was an American historian of 20th-century history, particularly the history of American labor unions. He was also long-time editor of three journals and magazines.[1][2][3][4][5]

Early years[edit]

Leab was born Daniel Joseph Liebeskind in Berlin, Germany, on August 29, 1936. His mother was Herta Marcus (1901–1981) from the East Prussian town of Gilgenburg (now Dąbrówno, Poland). His father was Leo Liebeskind (1897–1979) of Berlin. Although they had planned to leave Germany for Palestine, instead they emigrated to America in 1938, where they changed the surname from Liebeskind to Leab.[1][6]

In 1957, he obtained a BA from Columbia University. From 1957 to 1958, he attended Harvard Law School. Returning to Columbia, he obtained an MA in 1961 and PhD in 1969. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on the formative years of the American Newspaper Guild (1933-1936).[1][2]

Career[edit]

Academics[edit]

Teamsters clash with armed police during a Minneapolis 1934 strike.

In 1966, Leab began teaching at universities. He first taught in the history department of his alma mater, Columbia University. Eventually, he served there as associate dean of Columbia College, a member of the university's central administration, and member of the executive committee of the university's senate.[1][2]

In 1974, he began teaching at Seton Hall University. He began as an associate professor. By 1980, he had become a full professor. He taught 20th-century history for more than three decades there.[1][7]

Provost John Duff appointed him to oversee the university's American Studies Program. He served as acting chairman of the Department of History and two years as chair of University Rank and Tenure Committee. He created and directed its Multi-Cultural Program.[2][7]

He wrote or edited seven books, published more than 90 articles, and lectured extensively in Europe and America.[2][8]

Research topics included labor history, history in film, and cultural conflicts of the Cold War.[2][7][9]

He was a senior Fulbright lecturer at the University of Cologne two times (1977 spring, 1986–1987). He was also visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania (1986 spring) and at the Heim-Hoch-Volksschule, in Falkenstein, Bavaria, Germany (June 1970, July 1972, July 1975).[9]

Editing and publishing[edit]

In the 1960s, Leab served as an editorial assistant of and contributing editor to the Columbia Journalism Review.[10]

In 1974, Leab became managing editor of peer-reviewed Labor History journal and served for more than two decades.[1][9]

He was also publisher of American Books Prices Current, edited by his wife.[11]

In 1982, he became managing editor of American Communist History, peer-reviewed journal of the academic group Historians of American Communism (HOAC).[1] He also served as HOAC secretary and treasurer.[4]

Administration[edit]

Leab helped administer both Seton Hall and Columbia universities:

  • Seton Hall University:
    • 2005–2006: Member of Faculty Committee on Criminal Justice and Faculty Rights
    • 1996–1997: Chair of Program Review for Department of History
    • 1990–1995: Creator and Initiator of Multi-Cultural Diversity Program
    • 1990–1991: Chair of University Rank and Tenure Committee
    • 1987–1989: Member of Educational Policy Committee
    • 1974–1979: Director of American Studies Program
  • Columbia University:
    • 1973–1974: Special Assistant to Vice President and Provost
    • 1972–1974: Member of Executive Committee of University Senate
    • 1971–1972: Assistant Dean of Faculties of the University
    • 1969–1971: Associate Dean of Columbia College

Personal and death[edit]

Leab married Katharine Kyes Leab, the editor of American Book Prices Current (published by Bancroft-Parkman, Inc.), in 1964. They had three children: Abigail Leab Martin, Constance Rigney, and Marcus Leab.[11]

Leab quoted aphorisms to describe views on history with which he disagreed:

Leab held that such aphorisms merely pointed out "failings of History as a discipline and as a guide." Instead, he expressed his views on history with a quote from poet Maya Angelou:

History, despite its wrenching pain
Cannot be unlived, but if faced
With courage, need not be lived again.[2]

He served as justice of the peace for Washington, Connecticut, from 1999 until his death. He served on the Connecticut Region 12 Board of Education for Bridgewater-Roxbury-Washington (1997–2001, 2003–2004). He served as a board member for Blue Card (Holocaust Survivors Aid Organization) (1993–2000). He served on the board of trustees and secretary for the Clockwork Community Theatre of Oakville, Connecticut (2000–2001).

He died on November 15, 2016, at his home in Washington, Connecticut, surrounded by his family.[4][5]

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

Leab wrote the following:
  • A Union of Individuals: The Formation of the American Newspaper Guild, 1933-1936 (1970)[12][13]
  • From Sambo to Superspade: The Black Experience in Motion Pictures (1975)[14][15]
  • George Orwell : An Exhibition at the Grolier Club: Selections from the Collection of Daniel J. Leab (1996)[16]
  • I Was a Communist for the FBI: The Unhappy Life and Times of Matt Cvetic (2000) about FBI informant Matt Cvetic[17][18]
  • Orwell Subverted: The CIA and the Filming of Animal Farm (2007)[19][20]

Books co-written[edit]

Leab co-wrote the following with his wife:

  • The Auction Companion (1981)[21]

Books edited[edit]

Leab edited or co-edited the following:

  • American Working Class History: A Representative Bibliography (1983)[22]
  • The Labor History Reader (1985)[23]
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation Confidential Files: Communist Activity in the Entertainment Industry [microform] : FBI Surveillance Files on Hollywood, 1942-1958 (1991)[24]
  • Labor History Archives in the United States: A Guide for Researching and Teaching (1992)[25]
  • The Great Depression and the New Deal: A Thematic Encyclopedia (2010)[26]
  • Encyclopedia of American Recessions and Depressions (2014)[27]

Journals edited[edit]

Leab edited the following:

  • American Communist History (published by Historians of American Communism, HOAC) (2001–2016)
  • CLOSEUPS: The IAMHIST Bulletin quarterly (1999–2002): created, edited, contributed
  • Film History (1996–2016)
  • Historical Journal of Film, Radio & TV (1993–2016)
  • Washington Rod and Gun Club Bulletin (1996–1998)
  • Columbia Journalism Review (1960–1978):
    • Contributing editor (1972–1978)
    • Research associate (1964–1968)
    • Assistant editor (1962–1964)
    • Editorial assistant (1960–1962)

Encyclopedic articles[edit]

Leab contributed the following:

  • Enclycopedia of the American Left (1986): "Herbert Benjamin," "David Lasser"
  • Encyclopedia of World Biography (1987, 1988 1990, 1995): "Orson Welles," "Spencer Tracy," "Vanessa Redgrave," "Bing Crosby," "Clint Eastwood"
  • Dictionary of American Biography (Supplements): "Louis Boudin" (1977), "Jesse Lasky" (1980), "Joseph von Sternberg" (1988), "Siegfried Kracauer" (1988), "Louella Parons" (1994), "A.A. Berle, Jr." (1994), "Lowell Weicker, Sr." (1995)
  • Scibner's Encyclopedia of American Lives: "Burr Tilstrom" (1998), "Gordon Ray" (1999), "Jose Ferrer" (2001), "Dorothy Buffum Chandler" (202), "Huntley Brinkley" (2003), "Sports Figures" (2003)
  • American National Biography: "Heywood Broun" (1999), "Matt Cvetic" (1999), "Greta Garbo" (1999), "William Grant Still" (1999), "Louis Ludlow" (2004)

Articles in books and journals[edit]

Leab wrote the following for books or journals:

  • "The Curtain Goes Up: Notes on the New York Stage Before the Civil War" in King's Crown Essays (1957)
  • "Strike with Ukuleles" in Columbia Journalism Review (1963)
  • "The 'Image' of Journalist, 1864–1964" in Columbia Journalism Review (1964)
  • "The Western Rides Again" in Columbia University Forum (1964)
  • "Cold War Comics" in Columbia Journalism Review (1965)
  • "Cold War Comics" in Journalisten: Danks journalistforbunds und mediemsblad (1965)
  • "Pare Lorentz and American Government Film Production" in Midcontinent American Studies Journal (1965)
  • "A Genealogy of the New York Newspaper Merger" in Columbia Journalism Review (1965)
  • "Barter and Self-Help Groups, 1932–1933" in Midcontinent American Studies Journal (1965)
  • "A Genealogy of the New York Newspaper Merger" in Mergers and Acquisitions: The Journal of Corporate Ventures (1966)
  • "Dulles at the Brink: Some Diverse Reactions" in Journalism Quarterly (1966)
  • "How the Student Press Views Vietname" in The Collegiate Journalist (1967)
  • "Canned Crisis: US Magazines, Quemoy, and the Matsus" in Journalism Quarterly (1967)
  • "United We Eat: The Creation of the Unemployed Councils" in Labor History (1967)
  • "Harlem Rides the Range" in Cultural Affairs: A Journal of the Associated Council of the Arts (1969)
  • "Toward Unionization: The Newark Star Ledger Strike of 1934–1935" in Labor History (1970)
  • "The Memorial Day Massacre" in Midcontinent American Studies Journal (1967)
  • "Murder in Marseilles" in History of the 20th Century (1969)
  • "The Response to the Hutchins Commission" in Gazette: The International Journal for Mass Communications Studies (1970)
  • "The Gamut from A to B: The Image of the Black in pre-1915 Movies" in Political Science Quarterly (1973)
  • "Discussion Guide for Black History: Lost, Stolen, or Strayed" in Uses of the Past (1973)
  • "Some Problems in the Use of Film in Historical Research" in University Vision (1973)
  • "All Colored–But Not Much Different" in Phylon (1975)
  • "The Black in Film: An Annotated Bibliography" in Journal of Popular Film (1975)
  • "A Fly on the Bear's Back: Observations on the Moscow Book Trade" in AB Bookman's Weekly (1977)
  • "The American Auction Scene" in Antiquarian Book Monthly Review (1977)
  • "The American Auction Scene" in Antiquarian Book Monthly Review (1977)
  • "Goethe or Attila" in Ethnic Images in American Film and Television (1978)
  • "The Sassoon Sale" in AB Bookman's Weekly (1979)
  • "The Influence of Soviet Silent Film Stylistics Upon the American Literature of Film Theory and Criticism, 1925–1941" in FIAF Symposium 1977 (1979)
  • "The Blue Collar Ethnic in Bi-Centennial America: Rocky" in American History/American Film (1979)
  • "Confronting a Myth: Films About Work and Workers in America" in Film Library Quarterly (1979)
  • "Film Books" in Collectible Books (1979)
  • "Memoirs of a Film Book Collection" in American Book Collector (1980)
  • "Writing History with Film: The General Motors Sit-Down Strike" in Labor History (1980)
  • "Deutschland, USA: Te German-American on Film" in The Kaledeiscopic Lens (1980)
  • "American History through the Media: Labor History" in OAH Newsletter (1981)
  • "The Prescott Sales" in AB Bookman's Weekly (1982)
  • "The Black Man in American Film" in Zeitgeschichte in Film und Fernsehen (1982)
  • "New York: Buying Books at Auction" in Book World Advertiser (1982)
  • "See It Now: A Legend Reassessed" in American History/American Television (1983)
  • "How Red Was My Valley" in Journal of Contemporary History (1984)
  • "The Band Wagon" in International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers (1984)
  • "Crossfire" in International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers (1984)
  • "I am a Fugitive from a Chaingang" in International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers (1984)
  • "United We Eat: The Creation of the Unemployed Councils" in The Labor History Reader (1985)
  • "The Hollywood Film as Cold Warrior" in OAH Newsletter (1985)
  • "How Americans Fought the Cold War" in Civilsations (1985)
  • "The Iron Curtain (1949): Hollywood's First Cold War Movie" in Historical Journal of Film, Radio and TV (1988)
  • "Images, Mirages, and the Media: History and the Cinema" in Encounter (1989)
  • "Film and History: The 1930s" in Film History: Selected Course Outlines (1989)
  • "United We Eat: The Creation of the Unemployed Councils" in The Great Depression and the New Deal (1990)
  • "Change Patterns in Writing Labor History" in AB Bookman's Weekly (1990)
  • "...And I also Collect ...George Orwell" in Gazette of the Grolier Club (1990)
  • "The Moving Image as Interpreter of History: Telling the Dancer from the Dance" in Image as Artifact (1990)
  • "Anti-Communism, the FBI, and Matt Cvetic" in Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography (1991)
  • "The Commies: Hollywood in Kalten Krieg" in Kalter Krieg: 60 Films aus Ost und West (1991)
  • "Good Germans/Bad Nazis: Amerikanische Bilder aus dem Kalten Krieg und ihre Uhrsprünge" in Deutsches Historisches Museum Magazin 1992)
  • "I Was a Communist for the FBI" in Libertas: Festschrift für Erich Angermann (1992)
  • "Muckebarger and Guy's Cold War" (Review) in Historical Journal of Film (1993)
  • "Hollywood and the Cold War, 1945–1961" in Hollywood as Mirror (1993)
  • "Anti-Communist Films" in A Political Companion to American Movies (1994)
  • "Blacks in American Movies" in A Political Companion to American Movies (1994)
  • "Viewing the War with the Brothers Warner" in Film and the First World War (1995)
  • "In the Name of the Emperor: War Guilt and the Medium of Film" in Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and TV (1995)
  • "The Red Menace and Justice in the Pacific Northwest: the 1946 Trial for Espionage of Soviet Naval Lieutenant Nikolai Gregorovich Redin" in Pacific Northwest Historical Quarterly (1996)
  • "Clement Price, Liberators" (US, 192) and Truth in History..." in World War II, Film, and History (1996)
  • "Film in Context: I Was a Communist for the FBI" in History Today (1996)
  • "Posters: An Exhibition" (1997)
  • "An Ambiguous Isolationism/Interventionism, The Fighting 69th" in Hollywood and World War I (1997)
  • "Screen Images of the 'Other'" in Wilhelmine German and the United States" in Film History (1997)
  • "Coolidge, Hays, and 1920s Movies" in Calvin Coolidge the Coolidge Era (1998)
  • "From Even-Handedness to Red-Baiting" in Film History (1998)
  • "Fame is Fleeting" in Labor History (1999)
  • "I Was a Communist for the FBI" in The Movies as As History: Visions of the 20th Century (2000)
  • "A Walk on the Wilder Side: The Apartment as Social Commentary" in Windows on the Sixties (2000)
  • "Seite an Seite: Hollywood und die deutsche Filmkultur" in Die USA und Deutschland im Zeitalter des Kalten Krieges 1945-1990 (2001)[28]
  • "AB Bookman's Weekly: Ene Ergänzung" in Aus dem Antiquartiat (2001)
  • "Posters: A Selection from the Collection of Daniel Leab" (2001)
  • "Movie Stereotypes, 1890–1918: Some German and American Perspectives" in Bridging the Atlantic (2003)
  • "Labor/Antilabor" in Propaganda and Mass Persuasion (2003)
  • "Cold War" in Propaganda and Mass Persuasion (2003)
  • "This Can't Happen Here" in Historical Journal of Film, Radio and TV (2003)
  • "Busby Berkeley" in Encyclopedia of the Great Depression (2004)
  • "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" in Encyclopedia of the Great Depression (2004)
  • "Our Daily Bread" in Encyclopedia of the Great Depression (2004)
  • " Production Code Administration (Hayes Office)" in Encyclopedia of the Great Depression (2004)
  • "Edward G. Robinson" in Encyclopedia of the Great Depression (2004)
  • "Animators and Animals" in Historical Journal of Film, Radio and TV (2005)
  • "Fort Monmouth" in Encyclopedia of New Jersey (2004)
  • "The Hollywood Blacklist" in The Red Scare After 1945 (2005)
  • "The Hollywood Ten" in The Red Scare After 1945 (2005)
  • "Some Specks on the Turtle's Back" in American Communist History (2005)
  • "Some Notes" in In Memoriam: Stephen Marton-Mandel (2006)
  • "The American Government and the Filming of George Orwell's Animal Farm in the 1950s" in Media History (August 2006)
  • "Chicago's Sturm und Drang: Some Views of Police Violence in the Windy City" in Tales of Two Cities (2016)
  • "Cold War Comics" in Columbia Journalism Review (2015)[10]

Leab co-wrote the following articles with his wife:

  • "Appraisal" (with Katharine Kyes Leab) in Book Collecting: A Modern Guide (1977)
  • "The OTHER Auction House in England" (with Katharine Kyes Leab) in Town and Country (1982)
  • "The Auction Year" (with Katharine Kyes Leab) in Rare Books, 1983–1984 (1984)
  • "Anthony Rota" (with Katharine Kyes Leab) (2002)

Review articles[edit]

Leab wrote numerous reviews, which appear in the following journals:

Awards and recognition[edit]

Leab received the following awards and recognition.

  • 2005: Award for best article by senior scholar in 2005 volume of Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and Television
  • 1997: John Commerford Prize of the New York State Labor History Association
  • 1991-1992: Grant for Implementation of Pilot Multi-Media Core Course from New Jersey Department of Higher Education (Co-Principal Investigator)
  • 1989: Grant from Seton Hall University Research Council
  • 1986: Fulbright Senior Lectureship to University of Cologne
  • 1980: National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship
  • 1977: Fulbright Senior Lectureship to University of Cologne

Legacy[edit]

American Book Prices Current Exhibition Catalogue Awards[edit]

In 1987, Leab and his wife established and endowed the annual "Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Catalogue Awards" for excellence in publishing of catalogs and brochures that accompany exhibitions of library and archival materials, plus accompanying digital exhibitions. The Exhibition Awards Committee of the ALA/ACRL Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS) administers the awards.[29][30][31][32]

Book exhibitions[edit]

Animal Farm first edition cover.

Leab championed books in culture; an example was an exhibition of books by George Orwell held at Brown University in 1997, which featured books from Leab's personal collection. He gave the collection to Brown.[33]

Papers and collections[edit]

In addition to donating his collection of films and his extensive working library of printed books, magazines, catalogs and other ephemera on American and European Film and Cinema to the Film Department of the Museum of Modern Art, NY, in 2011, Leab left several collections of papers and books:

  • Papers of Daniel J. Leab at National Library of Australia (since 1970s): Academic essays, masters and doctoral theses; academic papers, drafts, critiques and addresses by authors involved in film industry; printed matter; German language material including proceedings of film conferences, essays on film classification and film production, 1965 bibliography of films and producers, and articles[34]
  • Daniel J. Leab Collection 1920-1977 at Center for Jewish History (since 1970s): Family scrapbooks and photo albums of parents Herta and Leo Leab plus travels of Leab, with annotations by Leab[35]
  • Daniel J. Leab Collection - Papers, 1900–1975 at Wayne State University - Walter P. Reuther Library (since 1980): Materials used to research his doctoral dissertation, published A Union of Individuals: The Formation of the American Newspaper Guild, 1933-1936 (1970) and for From Sambo to Superspade: The Black Experience in Motion Pictures (1975)[1]
  • Daniel J. Leab papers 1950-2006 at Brown University (since 2010): Materials by and about George Orwell, collected by Daniel J. Leab in writing Orwell Subverted: the CIA and the Filming of Animal Farm[36]
  • Daniel J. Leab collection at Seton Hall University (since 2015): Materials used for research on topics that include: the Cold War, American communism, the American labor movement, the history of the FBI and the CIA, and the history of film.[37]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Daniel J. Leab Collection: Papers, 1900–1975" (PDF). Wayne State University - Walter P. Reuther Library (Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs). May 1980. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Daniel J. Leab, PhD". Seton Hall University. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  3. ^ "Professor Dr. Daniel J. Leab". University of Cologne. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  4. ^ a b c "Passing of Dan Leab". Historians of American Communism. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  5. ^ a b "Daniel Leab". New York Times (Legacy). Retrieved 18 November 2016.
  6. ^ "Guide to the Papers of Herta (1901-1981) and Leo (1897-1979) Leab 1858-1981". Leo Baeck Institute Center for Jewish Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
  7. ^ a b c "Introducing The Daniel J. Leab Collection". Seton Hall University. 7 March 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  8. ^ "Daniel J. Leab". C-SPAN. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  9. ^ a b c "Prof. Daniel J. Leab". Beyond Enemy Lines. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  10. ^ a b "Cold War Comics". Columbia Journalism Review. 5 December 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2016.
  11. ^ a b "The Excellent Staff". American Book Prices Current. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  12. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (1970). "A Union of Individuals: The Formation of the American Newspaper Guild, 1933-1936". Columbia University Press. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  13. ^ Leab, Daniel J. "A Union of Individuals: The Formation of the American Newspaper Guild, 1933-1936". Library of Congress. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  14. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (1975). "From Sambo to Superspade: The Black Experience in Motion Pictures". Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  15. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (1975). "From Sambo to Superspade: The Black Experience in Motion Pictures". London: Secker & Warburg. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  16. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (1996). "George Orwell : An Exhibition at the Grolier Club: Selections from the Collection of Daniel J. Leab". Washington, Connecticut: Cogswell Tavern Press. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  17. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (2000). "I Was a Communist for the FBI: The Unhappy Life and Times of Matt Cvetic". Penn State University Press. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  18. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (2000). "I Was a Communist for the FBI: The Unhappy Life and Times of Matt Cvetic". Penn State University Press. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  19. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (2007). "Orwell Subverted: The CIA and the Filming of Animal Farm". Penn State University Press. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  20. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (2007). "Orwell Subverted: The CIA and the Filming of Animal Farm". Library of Congress. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  21. ^ Leab, Daniel J.; Leab, Katharine Kyes (1981). "The Auction Companion". Harper & Row. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  22. ^ Neufeld, Maurice F.; Leab, Daniel J.; Swanson, Dorothy, eds. (1983). "American Working Class History: A Representative Bibliography". New York: Bowker. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  23. ^ Leab, Daniel J., ed. (1985). The Labor History Reader. Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois Press. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  24. ^ Leab, Daniel J., ed. (1991). Federal Bureau of Investigation Confidential Files: Communist Activity in the Entertainment Industry [microform] : FBI Surveillance Files on Hollywood, 1942-1958. Bethesda, Maryland: University Publications of America. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  25. ^ Leab, Daniel J.; Mason, Philip P., eds. (1992). "Labor history archives in the United States : a guide for researching and teaching". Detroit: Wayne State University Press. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  26. ^ Leab, Daniel J., ed. (2010). "The Great Depression and the New Deal: A Thematic Encyclopedia". Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  27. ^ Leab, Daniel J., ed. (2014). "Encyclopedia of American Recessions and Depressions". Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  28. ^ Leab, Daniel J. (2001). "Hollywood und die deutsche Filmkultur". In Junker, Detlef. Die USA und Deutschland im Zeitalter des Kalten Krieges 1945-1990. Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt.
  29. ^ "The Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Catalogue Awards: Guidelines and Rules for Submissions". Rare Books & Manuscripts Section of the American Library Association. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  30. ^ "The Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards". Rare Books & Manuscripts Section of the American Library Association. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  31. ^ "Katharine Kyes Leab & Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Awards". American Library Association. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  32. ^ "Katharine Kyes Leab and Daniel J. Leab American Book Prices Current Exhibition Catalogue Awards". Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  33. ^ "George Orwell: An Exhibition from the Collection of Daniel J. Leab". Brown University. 1997. Retrieved 17 November 2016.
  34. ^ "Papers of Daniel J. Leab". National Library of Australia. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  35. ^ "Daniel J. Leab Collection 1920-1977". Center for Jewish History. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  36. ^ "Guide to the Daniel J. Leab papers 1950-2006" (PDF). Brown University. 2010. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  37. ^ "Daniel J. Leab collection". Seton Hall University. Retrieved 19 November 2016.

External links[edit]