Daniel N. Lockwood

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Daniel N. Lockwood, Congressman from New York

Daniel Newton Lockwood (June 1, 1841 Hamburg, New York – June 1, 1906 Hamburg, New York) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

Life[edit]

He graduated from Union College in 1865. Then he studied law, was admitted to the New York bar in 1866, and commenced practice in Buffalo, New York. He was District Attorney of Erie County from 1874 until 1877.

Lockwood was elected as a Democrat to the 43rd United States Congress, and served from March 4, 1877, to March 3, 1879. He was a delegate to the 1880 and 1884 Democratic National Conventions. In 1884, he nominated Grover Cleveland for President. Lockwood was United States Attorney for the Northern District of New York from 1886 to 1889.

Lockwood was elected again to the 52nd and 53rd United States Congresses, and served from March 4, 1891, to March 3, 1895. In 1894, he ran for Lieutenant Governor of New York on three Democratic tickets with David B. Hill and Everett P. Wheeler for Governor, but was defeated by Republican Charles T. Saxton. Lockwood was a delegate to the 1896 Democratic National Convention.

After the end of his political career he resumed his law practice before serving as the general manager from New York at the Pan American Exposition in 1901, the site of William McKinley's assassination. In 1903 Lockwood was appointed to the New York State Lunacy Commission, a position which he held until his death.

He was buried at the Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo.

His son Thomas Brown Lockwood (February 7, 1873 - August 20, 1947) ran unsuccessfully for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1914.

References[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Lyman K. Bass
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 32nd congressional district

1877–1879
Succeeded by
Ray V. Pierce
Preceded by
John M. Farquhar
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 32nd congressional district

1891–1895
Succeeded by
Rowland B. Mahany