Daniel Wakefield Smith

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Daniel Wakefield Smith
Daniel Wakefield Smith.JPG
Daniel Wakefield Smith
Born 1973 (age 43–44)
Nationality American
Occupation Photojournalist, theatre director, writer, composer, researcher, actor
Known for Photojournalism in Iraq, Afghanistan and Turkey;
recreations of radio drama;
composition and musical direction of the Live Music Project
Website http://www.danielwsmith.com

Daniel Wakefield Smith (born 1973) is an American photojournalist, writer, researcher, composer, theatre director and actor from New Haven, Connecticut.

Journalism and photojournalism[edit]

Smith is a journalist, researcher, and photographer who lives in Iraq, but has also worked in Afghanistan, Haiti and Turkey.[1][2] Smith, who has described himself as an "unembedded photojournalist", says he prefers to travel alone,[3][4] meeting local residents in sites of conflict or great poverty, photographing them and learning their stories.[4][5] The stories he writes and the photographs he has taken on these journeys have been published in the New Haven Advocate, other alternative newspapers, and various other publications.[6]

During a 2004 trip to Iraq, Smith was detained in Kufa by members of the Mehdi Army, taken to meet Muqtada al-Sadr, and subsequently released.[7][8] Smith also received a minor shrapnel wound during a 2006 visit to Baghdad.[9]

Smith has often collected donations to give to needy individuals and charities in the countries he visits; these donations include medical supplies which he gives to local hospitals.[4][9][10][11] He often does work for aid organizations, as well.

In 2007, Smith moved to Baghdad to do freelance print and photography work,[12] and in 2008 became a writer/photographer for the subscription-based Iraq news website "Iraqslogger.com", including a daily column rounding up U.S. newspapers' coverage of Iraq.[13] He now works as a political and human rights research consultant for a few NGOs as well as keeping his hand in freelance journalism.

Music[edit]

Smith is a composer and also plays piano, organ and harpsichord.[14] He studied composition with David Gleba of Branford, Connecticut.[14] Smith has composed original music for several theatre productions, including incidental music for productions of Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Molière's The Learned Ladies, and Fyodor Dostoevski's, "Notes From Underground.[14]

Smith has written orchestral works to accompany the words of such diverse authors as H. P. Lovecraft, Ernest Hemingway, Ray Bradbury, Wyllis Cooper, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Dr. Seuss. For performances, he has arranged works by Bach, Handel, Mendelssohn, Bloch, Schumann, Verdi, Tchaikovsky, Mussorgsky, and several by Mozart.

In 2003, Smith and violinist Netta Hadari founded The Live Music Project, a conductorless orchestra with a focus on classical and modern works, performed in a lively, casual atmosphere.[14][15] Smith is the orchestra's artistic director.[14] The Live Music Project has performed at the Quick Center in Fairfield since 2004.[15][16][17] Performances often incorporate dramatic readings which are thematically connected to the music being performed. Concert themes have included Russian composers,[15][18] "The Devil and the Violin",[19] "Music for Shakespeare",[20] "Dark Music and Scary Stories",[21] "Jewish Themes"[17] and programs focusing on the life and music of Mozart[22] and the Bach family.[23] Most Live Music Project concerts include original compositions by Smith.[15][17][19][20][21] At one concert, actor Keir Dullea, star of 2001: A Space Odyssey read American short stories underscored by Smith's original music.[24] Although much of Smith's music is in the style of 18th-century composers,[14] he has also on occasion incorporated the theremin into his compositions and performances.[21][25]

Radio drama[edit]

Smith has had an interest in radio dramas since the late 1990s, when he began listening to AM radio broadcasts of old-time radio dramas on When Radio Was.[1] With his interest piqued, Smith began to organize, perform in and direct re-creations of classic radio dramas as live theatrical events. The dramas were first performed by the New Haven Theatre Company; later, for about two and a half years, the dramas were broadcast live weekly on WYBC, Yale's AM radio station.[1][26] Beginning in 2000, Smith's radio drama recreations found a home at the Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts at Fairfield University.[27] As of 2010, Smith has led a repertory company of Connecticut actors in radio drama performances at the Quick Center for over 10 seasons. He acts and performs live sound-effects for the productions, as well as writing original musical scores, played either organ, piano and small string ensemble.[1][28]

Other work[edit]

Smith has also worked as a volunteer E.M.T., a trial consultant, medical study subject, and was a piano technician for ten years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Spiegel, Jan Ellen (2007-09-09). "We Interrupt This Play for a News Bulletin on the War". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  2. ^ Smith, Daniel (2008-03-20). "Iraq Five Years Later". New Haven Advocate. Retrieved 2008-04-18. [dead link]
  3. ^ Smith, Daniel (2007-07-19). "Women in a Hostile Nation: Part 1". New Haven Advocate. Retrieved 2007-09-09. [dead link]
  4. ^ a b c Smith, Daniel (2006). "Warzone Dispatches". danielwsmith.com. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  5. ^ Beech, Randall (2004-06-27). "‘Always say ‘hi’ to the guy with the gun’". New Haven Register. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  6. ^ Smith, Daniel. "Daniel W. Smith's Writing". danielwsmith.com. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  7. ^ Beech, Randall (2004-08-01). "In an Iraqi back alley, the mother of all scoops". New Haven Register. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  8. ^ Smith, Daniel (2004-07-06). "Iraq Journal: July 6, 2004". danielwsmith.com. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  9. ^ a b Beech, Randall (2007-05-07). "A photographer resumes his "weird little mission" in the world's most dangerous place". New Haven Register. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  10. ^ DeRoma, Tristram (2004-09-21). "Photographer tells of Mideast travels". New Haven Register. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  11. ^ Smith, Daniel (2006). "First Dispatch: One Bombing, Two Hospitals". danielwsmith.com. Retrieved 2007-09-09. 
  12. ^ Beech, Randall (2008-04-17). "Pope Benedict XVI’s U.S. visit stirs memories of 1979 road trip.". New Haven Register. Retrieved 2008-04-22. [dead link]
  13. ^ Smith, Daniel W. (2008-09-12). "MediaWatch". IraqSlogger. Praedict. Retrieved 2008-09-12. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f Robinson, Dale (2004-02-29). "Classical cool, and no conductor". ctcentral.com. Journal Register Company. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  15. ^ a b c d "The Live Music Project offers Russian program at Fairfield University's Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2004-03-05. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  16. ^ "The Live Music Project debuts at Fairfield University's Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2004-01-29. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  17. ^ a b c "Fairfield University's Quick Center for the Arts presents Live Music Project's "Jewish Themes" February 2". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2008-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  18. ^ Charles, Eleanor (2004-03-21). "The Guide". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  19. ^ a b "The Live Music Project offers "The Devil and the Violin" at Fairfield University's Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2005-09-12. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  20. ^ a b "The Live Music Project plays "Music for Shakespeare" at Fairfield University's Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2005-10-21. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  21. ^ a b c "The Quick Center opens 2006-2007 Concert Series with "Dark Music and Scary Stories" featuring Live Music Project". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2006-09-26. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  22. ^ "The Live Music Project considers Mozart's words and music at Fairfield University's Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2005-03-29. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  23. ^ "The Live Music Project of Fairfield University presents an evening of J.S. Bach and Sons at the Quick Center for the Arts April 20". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2007-04-09. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  24. ^ "The Live Music Project offers "America" at Fairfield University's Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2006-04-10. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  25. ^ "A Live Music Project family concert and dramatic reading at Fairfield University's Quick Center for the Arts". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts (Press release). Fairfield University. 2007-03-06. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 
  26. ^ Arnott, Chris (2007-05-29). "The well-rounded Daniel Smith". Arnott of the Arts. New Haven Advocate. Retrieved 2007-10-13. [dead link]
  27. ^ "Live radio broadcast of "A Christmas Carol" at Quick Center for the Arts" (Press release). Fairfield University. 2000-11-23. Retrieved 2007-10-13. 
  28. ^ "Radio Dramas". Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts. Fairfield University. Archived from the original on August 13, 2007. Retrieved 2008-04-18. 

External links[edit]