Danish Gold Coast

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Danish Gold Coast
Danish Guinea
Danske Guldkyst
Dansk Guinea
Denmark-Norway crown colony (1658–1814)
Denmark territory (1814–1850)
1658–1850
Flag
Flag of Denmark
Capital Osu (Christiansborg) (1658–1850)
Languages Danish, German (official)
Ga, Dangme,

Ewe, Akan

Political structure Denmark-Norway crown colony (1658–1814)
Denmark territory (1814–1850)
King of Denmark
 •  1658–1670 Frederick III of Denmark (first)
 •  1848–1863 Frederick VII of Denmark (last)
Governor-General
 •  1658–1659 Hendrik Carloff
 •  1847–1850 Rasmus Eric Schmidt
History
 •  Denmark annexation from Sweden 1658
 •  Treaty of Copenhagen 1660
 •  Disestablished March 30, 1850
Currency Danish rigsdaler
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Swedish Gold Coast
British Gold Coast
Today part of  Ghana

The Danish Gold Coast (Danish: Danske Guldkyst or Dansk Guinea) denotes the colonies that Denmark-Norway controlled in Africa as a part of the Gold Coast (roughly present-day southeast Ghana), which is on the petroleum and natural gas rich Gulf of Guinea. It was colonized by the Dano-Norwegian fleet, first under indirect rule by the Danish West India Company (a chartered company), later as a crown colony of the kingdom of Denmark-Norway.

Following the Norwegian Declaration of Independence in 1814, Denmark's five Danish Gold Coast Territorial Settlements and forts of the Kingdom of Denmark were sold to the United Kingdom and were incorporated into the British Gold Coast in 1850.

History[edit]

A contemporary drawing of the Danish colonial fort, Fort Christiansborg, now Osu Castle. The outpost to the right is Fort Prøvestenen.

On April 20, 1663, the Danish seizure of Fort Christiansborg and Carlsborg (Cape Castle) completed the annexation of the Swedish Gold Coast settlements. From 1674 to 1755 the settlements were administered by the Danish West India-Guinea Company. From December 1680 to 29 August 1682, the Portuguese occupied Fort Christiansborg.

In 1750 it was made a Danish crown colony. From 1782 to 1785 it was under British occupation.[citation needed] On 30 March 1850 all of Denmark's Danish Gold Coast Territorial Settlements and forts of the Kingdom of Denmark were sold to Britain[citation needed] and incorporated into the British Gold Coast.

The title of its chief colonial administrator was Opperhoved (singular; sometimes rendered in English as Station Chief) since 1658, only in 1766 upgraded to Governor.

Forts and settlements[edit]

Main forts[edit]

The following forts were in the possession of Denmark until all forts were sold to the United Kingdom in 1850.

Place in Ghana Fort name Founded/
Occupied
Ceded Comments
Accra Fort Christiansborg 1658 1850 First captured from the Swedes in 1658. Occupied between 1680 and 1682 by the Portuguese. Sold to the United Kingdom in 1850.
Old Ningo Fort Fredensborg 1734 1850 Sold to the United Kingdom in 1850.
Keta Fort Prinsensten 1784 1850 Sold to the United Kingdom in 1850.
Ada Fort Kongensten 1784 1850 Sold to the United Kingdom in 1850.
Teshie Fort Augustaborg 1787 1850 Sold to the United Kingdom in 1850.

Temporarily held forts and trading posts[edit]

Apart from these main forts, several forts and trading posts were temporarily held by the Danes.

Place in Ghana Fort name Founded/
Occupied
Ceded Comments
Cape Coast Fort Carlsborg 1658 1664 Captured from the Swedes in 1658. Captured by the British in 1664.
Amanful Fort Frederiksborg 1659 1685
Cong Cong Heights 1659 1661

See also[edit]

Sources and references[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Closing the Books: Governor Edward Carstensen on Danish Guinea, 1842-50. Translated from the Danish by Tove Storsveen. Accra, Ghana: Sub-Saharan Publishers, 2010.

External links[edit]