Danthonia decumbens

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Danthonia decumbens
Danthonia decumbens horst.jpeg
Habitus
Danthonia decumbens.jpeg
Spikelets
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Poales
Family: Poaceae
Genus: Danthonia
Species: D. decumbens
Binomial name
Danthonia decumbens
(L.) DC.
Synonyms [1]
  • Avena spicata All. ex Kunth [Invalid]
  • Brachatera decumbens (L.) Desv.
  • Bromus decumbens Koeler
  • Danthonia decipiens (O.Schwarz & Bassler) Á.Löve & D.Löve
  • Danthonia glaberrima (Post) Valdés & H.Scholz
  • Festuca decumbens L.
  • Melica decumbens (L.) Weber
  • Melica rigida Wibel [Illegitimate]
  • Poa decumbens (L.) Scop.
  • Sieglingia decumbens (L.) Bernh.
  • Triodia decumbens (L.) P.Beauv.
  • Triodia glaberrima Post
  • Triodon decumbens (L.) Baumg. [Invalid]

Danthonia decumbens (formerly Sieglingia decumbens) is a species of grass commonly known as the heath grass,[2] heath-grass,[3] or staggers grass[4] It is a tussock grass native to Europe and adjacent parts of Asia and North Africa. It may also be native to Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.

Description[edit]

Danthonia decumbens is a perennial plant with a decumbent habit; it lies on the ground with the tips turned upward.

It has narrow, bright green leaves taper to a sharp point and are rather hairy. A long upper leaf sheath clasps the delicate stem. The stem is 15–30 centimetres (5.9–11.8 in) high and slightly bent at the base, smooth with 1 to 3 nodes.

The ligule consists of a ring of hairs, as in the purple moor grass, Molinia caerulea, except that in this plant each end has a tuft of longer hairs.[2]

The panicle consists of 4 or 5 large erect glaucous silvery green or purplish awnless spikelets. These are arranged alternately on the upper part of the stem. The bunchgrass flowers in the summer months.

Ecology[edit]

The plant is found on acid pastures and heathland, on sandy or peat soils, which are also often damp.

The grass, having no domestic forage value, is not grown agriculturally.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Danthonia decumbens (L.) DC.". The Plant List. Retrieved 27 April 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c C. E. Hubbard (1978). Grasses. Revised by J. C. E. Hubbard (3rd ed.). Penguin Books. pp. 350–351. ISBN 978-0-14-013227-4. 
  3. ^ Stace, Clive, 1997. New Flora of the British Isles. Second edition. p 899.
  4. ^ "Melica decumbens". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 2 July 2015. 
  • Rose, Frances, 1974. Grasses, sedges and rushes, pages 20-21

External links[edit]