Daphne Maxwell Reid

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Daphne Maxwell Reid
Daphne Maxwell Reid at USDA Women’s History Month Celebration 2012.jpg
Reid in 2012
Born
Daphne Etta Maxwell[1]

(1948-07-13) July 13, 1948 (age 72)
Alma materNorthwestern University
OccupationActress, comedian
Years active1979–present
Spouse(s)
(m. 1982)
; Robert Tubbs
Children1

Daphne Etta Maxwell Reid (née Maxwell; July 13, 1948) is an American actress, designer, and former model. She is best known for The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (1993–1996) in her role as the second Vivian Banks on the NBC sitcom.

Early life[edit]

Reid was born in New York City, the daughter of Rosalee and Green Maxwell.[1] She is a graduate of The Bronx High School of Science. She received a degree in interior design and architecture from Northwestern University, which she attended on a scholarship and where she became the first African-American woman to be named homecoming queen. While at Northwestern she began a modeling career, eventually signing with the Eileen Ford modeling agency. She was the first black woman to be on the cover of Glamour magazine.[2]

Career[edit]

She has appeared in numerous television programs. Her best-known role was replacing Janet Hubert-Whitten as Vivian Banks on the NBC sitcom The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air from 1993 to 1996. She joined the show right after the fictional character Nicky Banks was born toward the end of Season 3, when Hubert-Whitten was released from her contract after a contract violation and multiple problems working with the show's star, Will Smith.

Before that role, she starred in several television series including, Simon & Simon, Frank’s Place, and Snoops.

She had a recurring role as JT's mother, Frances Hunter, on the UPN sitcom Eve, and then played Juanita Lawrence on the BET sitcom Let's Stay Together.

Reid is also an accomplished photographer[3] as well as a designer and clothing creator.

During the 1980s and 1990s Reid served on the advisory board of the National Student Film Institute.[4][5]

She is a recipient of the Women of Vision Award from Women in Film & Video, among a myriad of other awards.

Personal life[edit]

Daphne and Tim Reid in 1997

With her husband, actor Tim Reid, she owned and operated New Millennium Studios in Petersburg, Virginia, until 2014.

She also served on the board of visitors at Virginia State University, for eight years. She was appointed in July 2008.

On July 31, 2010, she became an honorary member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, during their 50th national convention in New Orleans.

She has one son, Chris Tubbs, from her first marriage to the late Robert Tubbs; and two stepchildren, Timothy II (b. 1968) and Tori Reid (b. 1971). She also has three grandchildren.[citation needed]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1984 Protocol Helene
1992 Color Adjustment Herself Documentary
1995 Once Upon a Time... When We Were Colored Miss Maxey Also Second Unit Director
1999 Asunder Marty's Wife Also Co-Executive Producer
2002 Paul Mooney: Analyzing White America N/A Documentary
(Co-Executive Producer)
2003 For Real N/A Executive Producer
2010 Pantheon Black Mom Direct-to-video
2013 Troop 491: the Adventures of the Muddy Lions Principal Brown
2015 Living in a Food Desert Narrator Documentary
2016 By the Grace of Bob Nell
2016 Playing the Duke Sally Short film
2018 Out of Gas Mother
2019 Harriet Miz Lucy

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1979 The Duke Unknown role 2 episodes
1979 A Man Called Sloane Dr. Karla Meredith "The Shangri-La Syndrome"
Credited as Daphne Maxwell
1980 Coach of the Year Merissa Lane TV movie
Credited as Daphne Maxwell
1980–1982 WKRP in Cincinnati Jessica Langtree / Elaine Parker 2 episodes
1981–1986 Hill Street Blues Kelly Martin / News Anchor / Sheila Roberts 4 episodes
1982
1983 T.J. Hooker Ellen "The Shadow of Truth"
1983 Hardcastle and McCormick Newswoman / Tawnia Grey 3 episodes
1983–1985 The A-Team Kamora Kaboko / Nurse Lewis 2 episodes
1983–1987 Simon & Simon Temple Hill Series regular (16 episodes)
1984 The Duck Factory Saleswoman "Filling Buddy's Shoes"
1984 Matt Houston Mrs. Richards "Stolen"
1984 Paper Dolls Nancy "#1.13"
1985 The Insiders Unknown role "Another Fine Mess"
1985 Cagney & Lacey Noreen Adler "The Clinic"
1985 The Fall Guy Unknown role "Seavers: Dead or Alive"
1986 That's My Mama Now! Tracy Taylor TV movie
1987 The Long Journey Home Joan Haines TV movie
1987 CBS Summer Playhouse Host 6 episodes
1987–1988 Frank's Place Hanna Griffin Series regular (22 episodes)
1987–1988 Super Password Herself / Celebrity Contestant Recurring role (18 episodes)
1987–1989 The New Hollywood Squares Herself / Panelist Recurring role (5 episodes)
1988 Murder, She Wrote Nan Wynn "The Body Politic"
1989 ABC Afterschool Specials Judith Daniels "The Cheats"
1989 Snoops Micki Dennis Co Star - 13 episodes
1990 Match Game Herself / Panelist Recurring role (5 episodes)
1992 The Cosby Show Millicent "Clair's Reunion"
1992 You Must Remember This Coach Dawson TV movie
1993–1996 The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Vivian Banks Series regular (74 episodes)
1994 Will You Marry Me? Herself TV movie
1996 Sister, Sister Charmagne "Double Exposure"
1998 In the House Cleo Stanton "My Pest Friend's Wedding"
1998-2000 Linc's Eartha 14 episodes
2000 Alley Cats Strike Cathy McLemore TV movie
2003–2006 Eve Frances Hunter Recurring role (6 episodes)
2004 Crossing Jordan Mrs. Avery "Justice Delayed"
2005 Slavery and the Making of America Harriet Jacobs "Seeds of Destruction"
2007 Polly and Marie Judge Landers TV movie
2007 E! True Hollywood Story Herself / Interviewee "Will Smith"
2011–2014 Let's Stay Together Juanita Lawrence 3 episodes
2018–2019 Jacqueline and Jilly Zillah Stewart Series regular (6 episodes)

Music videos[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1981 The Whispers: "It's A Love Thing" Woman

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://www.filmreference.com/film/62/Daphne-Maxwell-Reid.html
  2. ^ https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/gallery/2019/oct/09/model-behaviour-meet-the-black-women-who-revolutionised-fashion-in-pictures
  3. ^ "Daphne Maxwell Reid's Fresh Prints". Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  4. ^ Editor (June 10, 1994). National Student Film Institute/L.A: The Sixteenth Annual Los Angeles Student Film Festival. The Directors Guild Theatre. pp. 10–11.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Editor (June 7, 1991). Los Angeles Student Film Institute: 13th Annual Student Film Festival. The Directors Guild Theatre. p. 3.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)

External links[edit]