Yell County Courthouse

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Yell County Courthouse
Yell County Courthouse 002.jpg
Yell County Courthouse is located in Arkansas
Yell County Courthouse
Yell County Courthouse
Location 209 Union St., Dardanelle, Arkansas
Coordinates 35°13′26″N 93°9′23″W / 35.22389°N 93.15639°W / 35.22389; -93.15639Coordinates: 35°13′26″N 93°9′23″W / 35.22389°N 93.15639°W / 35.22389; -93.15639
Area 1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built 1914 (1914)
Built by L. R. Wight and Company
Architect Frank W. Gibb
Architectural style Classical Revival
NRHP reference # 92001176[1]
Added to NRHP September 8, 1992

The Yell County Courthouse is a courthouse in Dardanelle, Arkansas, United States, one of two county seats of Yell County, built in 1914. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. The courthouse is the second building to serve the Dardanelle district of Yell County.

History[edit]

Yell County was founded from portions of Scott and Pope counties in 1840. A courthouse was established at Monrovia, but was soon relocated to Danville to be more centrally located. Following the Civil War in 1875, Dardanelle was made a second county seat.[2] Arkansas has ten counties with dual county seats. A commercial building on Front Street between Green and Oak Streets in Dardanelle was made into the district's first courthouse in 1875, and a jail was built close by. The courthouse burned on April 12, 1912, leading the county to buy a new plot of land on Union Street. Yell County contracted architect Frank W. Gibb, who in his lifetime designed 60 courthouses in Arkansas as well as the Arkansas Building at the St. Louis World's Fair and the Buckstaff Bathhouse in Hot Springs, Arkansas. Contractor L.R. Wight and Company of Dallas, Texas built the structure for under $25,000 (equivalent to $611,000 today).[3]

Architecture[edit]

Similar to the Dallas County Courthouse in Fordyce built by Gibb in 1911, the building features typical details of the neoclassical style. The symmetric facade with doric columns and white trim all fit with the style. An octagonal roof ornament tops the T-shaped building.

Confederate monument[edit]

Dardanelle Confederate Monument 002.jpg

The Dardanelle Confederate Monument is located near the Yell County Courthouse on Union Street in Dardanelle. Erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) in 1921, the monument was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996 as part of the Civil War Commemorative Sculpture Multiple Property Submission.[1]

The UDC raised $1,760 ($24,147 today) to construct the monument between two banks in downtown Dardanelle. Following the completion of a new bridge over the Arkansas River in 1930, the UDC suggested it be moved so that "all who crossed the bridge would find themselves face to face with the image in marble of the greatest soldier in the world - the Confederate soldier." The monument was moved to the southeast corner of the courthouse grounds, where it has remained ever since. The monument formerly contained plumbing allowing it to operate as a fountain which has since been removed.

An inscription reads: "To the Confederate soldiers of Yell County, in appreciation of their splendid valor and loyalty, this monument is erected".[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ Gleason, Mildred Diane (May 21, 2012). "Yell County". Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. Butler Center for Arkansas Studies at the Central Arkansas Library System. Retrieved July 16, 2013. 
  3. ^ Gleason, Mildred Diane (November 9, 2011). "Dardanelle (Yell County)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture. Butler Center for Arkansas Studies at the Central Arkansas Library System. Retrieved July 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ John Slater (March 7, 1996). "Dardanelle Confederate Monument" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Registration. Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved July 17, 2013. [dead link]