Darell Leiking

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Ignatius Darell Leiking

Darell Leiking MITI.jpg
Minister of International Trade and Industry of Malaysia
In office
2 July 2018 – 24 February 2020
MonarchMuhammad V
Abdullah
Prime MinisterMahathir Mohamad
DeputyOng Kian Ming
Preceded byMustapa Mohamed
Succeeded byMohamed Azmin Ali
ConstituencyPenampang
Member of the Malaysian Parliament
for Penampang
Assumed office
5 May 2013
Preceded byBernard Giluk Dompok (UPKOBN)
Majority10,216 (2013)
23,473 (2018)
Member of the Sabah State Legislative Assembly
for Moyog
Assumed office
26 September 2020
Preceded byJenifer Lasimbang (WARISAN)
Majority5,935 (2020)
Personal details
Born (1971-08-23) 23 August 1971 (age 49)
Penampang, Sabah, Malaysia
CitizenshipMalaysian
Political party
Other political
affiliations
People's Pact (PR) (2013–2016)
Spouse(s)Jennifer Aileen Jongiji
Alma materUniversity of Hertfordshire[1]
OccupationPolitician

Datuk Darell Leiking, also known as Ignatius Dorell Leiking (born 23 August 1971) is a Malaysian politician who served as the Minister of International Trade and Industry in the Pakatan Harapan (PH) administration under former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad from July 2018 to the collapse of the PH administration in February 2020. He has served as the Member of Parliament (MP) for Penampang since May 2013, Member of the Sabah State Legislative Assembly (MLA) for Moyog since September 2020 and founding as well as 1st Deputy President of the Sabah Heritage Party (WARISAN) which is aligned with the PH opposition coalition since October 2016. [2][3]

Political career[edit]

State rights[edit]

Leiking is one of many Sabah politicians who fight for the state rights as enshrined in the Malaysia Agreement,[4] and he constantly urges the government to provide a definite solution to the problem of illegal immigrants in the state, especially the problems caused by Project IC with the huge influx of Filipino refugees, and to set to rest the North Borneo dispute once and for all.[5][6] He has rejected controversial remarks made towards other minority groups by a prominent minister in the cabinet, which was echoed by Baru Bian of the People's Justice Party (PKR).[7] He has also spoken out against discrimination towards other ethnic groups by certain politicians.[8]

Elections[edit]

2013 general election[edit]

In the 2013 election, Leiking with his party of PKR faced Bernard Giluk Dompok of United Pasokmomogun Kadazandusun Murut Organisation (UPKO) and subsequently won the parliamentary seat with a large majority.[9]

2018 general election[edit]

In the 2018 election, Leiking who had joined Sabah Heritage Party (WARISAN) after leaving PKR in 2016;[10][11] defending his seat by defeating his cousin Ceasar Mandela Malakun of UPKO with another large majority.[12][13][14]

Election results[edit]

Parliament of Malaysia[15][16]
Year Constituency Votes Pct Opponent(s) Votes Pct Ballots cast Majority Turnout
2013 P174 Penampang, Sabah Darell Leiking (PKR) 22,598 62.60% Bernard Giluk Dompok (UPKO) 12,382 34.30% 36,818 10,216 83.21%
Melania Annol (STAR) 1,119 3.10%
2018 Darell Leiking (WARISAN) 32,470 75.32%2 Ceasar Mandela Malakun (UPKO) 8,997 20.87%2 43,525 23,473 82.17%
Cleftus Stephen Spine (STAR) 1,196 2.77%
Edwin Bosi (PKAN) 445 1.03%
Notes:
Table excludes votes for candidates who finished in third place or lower.
2 Different % used for 2018 election.
Sabah State Legislative Assembly[17]
Year Constituency Votes Pct Opponent(s) Votes Pct Ballots cast Majority Turnout
2020 N26 Moyog, P174 Penampang Darell Leiking (WARISAN) 8,437 62.83% Joseph Suleiman (STAR) 2,502 18.64% 13,427 5,935 68.98%
John Chryso Masabal (PBS) 1,175 8.75%
William Sampil (PCS) 975 7.26%
Marcel Annol (LDP) 185 1.38%
Vinson Loijon (PPRS) 82 0.61%
Robert Richard Foo (IND) 71 0.53%

Honours[edit]

Honours of Malaysia[edit]

Foreign honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Change of gov't boon for Darell Leiking". Bernama. Malaysiakini. 2 July 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  2. ^ "Maklumat Ahli Parlimen" (in Malay). Parliament of Malaysia. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  3. ^ "New Cabinet all sworn-in before King (Full List)". The Star. 2 July 2018. Retrieved 3 July 2018.
  4. ^ Zam Yusa (11 February 2018). "Stop acting like you're the opposition, Leiking tells state govt". Free Malaysia Today. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Delays to Long-awaited Answers on Illegal Immigrants Uncalled For". Borneo Today. 30 November 2016. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  6. ^ "Call to solve Manila's claim on Sabah once and for all". The Borneo Post. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  7. ^ "'You Have Insulted all Christians', Darell Leiking ticks off FT Minister". Borneo Today. 4 February 2018. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  8. ^ "Hapuskan Politik Perkauman; Bukankah Suluk Suku Kaum Sabah?" (in Malay). Borneo Today. 1 March 2017. Retrieved 31 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Dompok falls to PKR's Darrel in Penampang". The Borneo Post. 6 May 2013. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Penampang MP Darell Leiking quits PKR". Free Malaysia Today. 22 September 2016. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  11. ^ Muna Khalid (6 April 2018). "Composition of the Dewan Rakyat at dissolution". Bernama. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  12. ^ Natasha Joibi (28 April 2018). "Cousins Mandela and Leiking vie for Penampang seat". The Star. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  13. ^ Shalina R (29 April 2018). "Cousins Darell, Mandela face off for Penampang seat". The Borneo Post. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  14. ^ Nandini Balakrishnan (10 May 2018). "Historic Win: The Complete Result Of GE14's Parliamentary Seats Across Malaysia". Says.com. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  15. ^ "Keputusan Pilihan Raya Umum Parlimen/Dewan Undangan Negeri". Election Commission of Malaysia. Retrieved 22 May 2018. Percentage figures based on total turnout (including votes for candidates not listed).
  16. ^ "Sabah [Parliament Results]". The Star. Archived from the original on 18 May 2018. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  17. ^ "N53 Senallang". Malaysiakini. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  18. ^ "Chief Judge of Sabah and Sarawak head list of 1,158 Sabah award recipients". Bernama. Borneo Post. 6 October 2018. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External links[edit]