Dario Graffi

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Dario Graffi
Born (1905-01-10)10 January 1905
Rovigo
Died 28 December 1990(1990-12-28) (aged 85)
Bologna
Nationality Italian
Awards
Scientific career
Fields
Academic advisors
Notable students Lamberto Cesari

Dario Graffi (10 January 1905 – 28 December 1990) was an influential Italian mathematical physicist, known for his researches on the electromagnetic field, particularly for a mathematical explanation of the Luxemburg effect,[3] for proving an important uniqueness theorem for the solutions of a class of fluid dynamics equations including the Navier-Stokes equation,[4] for his researches in continuum mechanics and for his contribution to oscillation theory.[5]

Life and academic career[edit]

Dario Graffi was born in Rovigo, the son of Michele, a yarn wholesale trader and of Amalia Tedeschi.[6] He attended the Istituto tecnico in his home town, specializing in physics and mathematics, but got his diploma in Bologna in 1921, where his family had moved a year before.[6]

He graduated from the University of Bologna in Physics in 1925,[7] when he was 20,[8] and in mathematics in 1927,[7] when he was 22:[8] both the degrees were awarded cum laude,[9]

Honors[edit]

He was awarded the Golden medal "Benemeriti della Scuola, della Cultura, dell'Arte" in 1964, and a year later, the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei awarded him the Prize of the President of the Italian Republic.[2]

Work[edit]

Research Activity[edit]

Graffi is known for his researches on the electromagnetic field, particularly for a mathematical explanation of the Luxemburg effect, for proving an important uniqueness theorem for the solutions of a class of fluid dynamics equations including the Navier-Stokes equation,[10] for his researches in continuum mechanics and for his contribution to oscillation theory.


Selected publications[edit]

Graffi published 181 works.[11] lists of his publications are included in references (Cercignani 1992, pp. 108–114) and in the biographical section of his "Selected works" (1999, pp. XX–XXVI): however, the set of lecture notes (Graffi 1981) is not listed in any of his publication lists.

Scientific works[edit]

Scientific papers[edit]

Books[edit]

Historical, commemorative and survey works[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cercignani (1992, p. 104),(Ridolfi 1976, p. 357).
  2. ^ a b Cercignani (1992, p. 104), (Ridolfi 1976, p. 357).
  3. ^ (Morro 1993, p. 43).
  4. ^ See for example (Serrin 1963, §5), (Morro 1993, p. 42), (Fabrizio 2012, p. 184).
  5. ^ (Fabrizio 2012, pp. 184–185).
  6. ^ a b See reference (Consiglio Scientifico del G.N.F.M. 1993, p. XI) or its English translation in (Fabrizio 2012, p. 189).
  7. ^ a b (Ridolfi 1976, p. 357), (Cercignani 1992, p. 101, 1992a, p. III)
  8. ^ a b (Morro 1993, p. 42).
  9. ^ (Ridolfi 1976, p. 357), (Cercignani 1992, p. 101, 1992a, p. III): Morro (1993, p. 42) seems to state only that he graduated cum laude in physics.
  10. ^ See for example (Serrin 1963, §5).
  11. ^ According to Cercignani (1992, p. 104): Morro (1993, p. 42) states that Graffi published 181 scientific works.
  12. ^ See (Serrin 1959, p. 251, footnote 1).

References[edit]

Biographical references[edit]

General references[edit]

Scientific references[edit]

Publications dedicated to him[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Morando, Adriano (2002), "GRAFFI, Dario", Enciclopedia Treccani, Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani (in Italian), LVIII, retrieved December 29, 2015 . The biographical entry about Dario Graffi in the "Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani (Biographical Dictionary of Italians)" section of the Enciclopedia Treccani.