Darrell Williams

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This article is about the New Zealand rugby league footballer. For the American football player, see Darryl Williams. For the ice hockey player, see Darryl Williams (ice hockey). For the Australian politician, see Daryl Williams.
Darrell Williams
Personal information
Full name Darrell Christopher Williams
Playing information
Position Fullback, Centre, Wing
Years Team Pld T G FG P
Mount Albert
1987–93 Manly-Warringah 93 15 0 0 60
1994 Parramatta 5 0 0 0 0
Total 98 15 0 0 60
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1985–90 New Zealand 21 4 0 0 16
Coaching information
Years Team Gms W D L W%
Source: [1], [2], [3] & [4]

Darrell Christopher Williams[1] is a New Zealand rugby league selector and NRL judiciary member and a former footballer and coach. A New Zealand international representative outside back, he played his club football in the Auckland Rugby League for Mt Albert and in Sydney's NSWRFL Premiership for the Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles (with whom he won the 1987 NSWRL Grand Final) and the Parramatta Eels. He later coached the Samoan national team.

Playing career[edit]

Williams started his playing career in the Auckland Rugby League competition where he played with the Mt Albert club.[2] During this time he gained selection for New Zealand on 21 occasions between 1985 and 1990. He was selected for the 1985 New Zealand Tour of Great Britain and Fance and would make his test debut playing on the wing in the third test against Great Britain at the Elland Road ground in Leeds which ended in a 6-all draw. His final test appearance for NZ came on 19 August 1990 against the Australians in Wellington, with the Aussies winning the game 24–6. He scored 5 tries in his test career including scoring a double in the third game of the 1986 Trans-Tasman Test series against Australia at Lang Park in Brisbane, though Australia would win the game 32–12 and the series 3–0.

In the third test of the 1989 Trans-Tasman series against Australia in Auckland, Williams was on the receiving end of a famous hit from Australian skipper Wally Lewis. This tackle was later described by commentator Ray Warren as easily the biggest he's ever seen.[3]

Williams moved to Australia to play in the NSWRL premiership for the Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles at the start of the 1987 NSWRL season. He made his debut for the Sea Eagles in the wing in a 4-all draw with St George in the opening round of the season. He would go on to play in Manly's Grand Final winning team that year, becoming the first Kiwi to play in an Australian grand final-winning team.[4] Following the grand final victory he travelled with Manly to England for the 1987 World Club Challenge against their champions, Wigan.

In 1988 he played in the centres in Manly's 30–0 win over Great Britain during their tour of Australasia, and later that year played at fullback for New Zealand in the 12–10 Test win over the Lions in the final match of their tour in Christchurch. Despite being in good form for Manly (though they had failed to reach the 1988 Grand Final), Injury would then keep him out of New Zealand's 1988 World Cup Final team that went down 25–12 to Australia at the Eden Park ground in Auckland.

After seven seasons with Manly where he played a total of 93 games and scored 15 tries, injuries restricted him to just two games in 1993 and he was released from the club at the end of the season. From there he joined the Parramatta Eels for one more season in 1994. However, injuries would again restrict him to just 5 games for the Eels before announcing his retirement. His final game for the Eels was while playing at Five-eighth in a 34–4 loss to the Newcastle Knights at Marathon Stadium on 15 May 1994.

Later years[edit]

In the 1990s Williams was appointed a National Rugby League judiciary member.[5] He was later appointed coach of the Samoa national rugby league team for their 2000 World Cup campaign.[6] Samoa reached the quarter finals where they faced eventual champions Australia and were knocked out. Williams has also been a selector for the New Zealand national side.[7] During the lead up to the 2008 NRL grand final Williams, at the time the longest-serving member of the NRL judiciary, threatened legal action against the Melbourne Storm for criticism levelled at the judiciary over their controversial suspension of Storm captain Cameron Smith.[8] This led to Storm coach Craig Bellamy and then-CEO Brian Waldron paying out $105,000 plus legal costs to Williams and the other judiciary panellists in late 2010.[9]


  1. ^ WILLIAMS, Darrell Christopher 1985 – 90 – Kiwi #586 nzleague.co.nz
  2. ^ NZPA (23 September 2008). "Former Sea Eagle backs Warriors". tvnz.co.uk (Television New Zealand Limited). Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  3. ^ Webster, Andrew (April 2004). "A few Drinks with Ray Warren". Inside Sport. Retrieved 3 July 2009. 
  4. ^ Fagan, Sean (2002). "New Zealand Rugby League Players". New Zealanders in Premiership Grand Finals. rl1908.com. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  5. ^ "Player Profile: Darrell Williams". Biography & Career Highlights. yesterdayshero.com.au. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  6. ^ Coffey, John; Wood, Bernie (2008). 100 years: Māori rugby league, 1908–2008. Huia Publishers. p. 320. ISBN 978-1-86969-331-2. 
  7. ^ NZPA (30 April 2008). "League: Marshall out of Anzac test". nzherald.co.uk (APN Holdings NZ Limited). Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  8. ^ Santow, Simon (2 October 2008). "NRL grand final build-up dominated by legal talk". The World Today. Retrieved 30 May 2009. 
  9. ^ "Melbourne Storm coach Craig Bellamy and former CEO Brian Waldron pay $105,000 over judiciary comments". The Daily Telegraph (Australia: Herald and Weekly Times). 18 October 2010. Retrieved 18 October 2010.