Darryl Scott

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For those of a similar name, see Darrell Scott (disambiguation).
Darryl Scott
Pitcher
Born: (1968-08-06) August 6, 1968 (age 48)
Fresno, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 31, 1993, for the California Angels
Last MLB appearance
October 1, 1993, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 1–2
Earned run average 5.85
Strikeouts 13
Teams

Darryl Nelson Scott (born August 6, 1968 in Fresno, California) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for the California Angels during the 1993 California Angels season.

High school and college[edit]

Scott was born in Fresno, California, and took up pitching when he was nine.[1] Scott attended high school at Yuba City High School in Yuba City, California and pitched for their baseball team.[2] He was recruited out of high school by Loyola Marymount University.[1] He pitched for three years for the Loyola Marymount Lions, and during the 1988 season set a school record for saves in a season when he got his 12th in a game against the University of Nevada-Reno.[3] In 1990, his senior season, Scott struck out 90 batters, highest in the conference.[4] Despite this, Scott was not selected in the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft.[4] However, he was signed by the California Angels as an amateur free agent shortly after the draft on June 13, 1990.[5]

Career[edit]

Scott played his first season with the Boise Hawks of the Northwest League. In 27 pitching appearances, he had an earned run average (ERA) of 1.34, and won two games and lost one.[2] He moved up the next season to the Quad Cities Angels of the Midwest League, where he pitched in 47 games, finishing the season with an ERA of 1.55 and 19 saves.[2] The following season he moved up to both the AA and AAA level minor league teams of the Angels, the Midland Angels and the Edmonton Trappers, respectively. He played in 27 games for Midland and again had an ERA under 2 (1.82) though with Edmonton he pitched in 31 games with a 5.20 ERA.[2] After starting the 1993 season with the Vancouver Canadians, the Angels' new AAA affiliate, he was promoted to the Angels' roster, and made his major league debut on May 31, 1993.

Scott made his debut against the Toronto Blue Jays, and pitched a shutout eighth inning in a 10-5 loss.[6] After pitching in five more games in relief, he was at a hospital on June 18 with his wife for the birth of their newborn son, and while at the hospital, received a call from Dan O'Brien, Sr. telling him that he was being sent back down to the minors.[7] After a couple months in Vancouver, Scott was called back up to the majors in September.[6] He pitched in ten more games that season, and notched his only major league win on September 19 against the Texas Rangers.[6] He made his final major league appearance on October 1, 1993 against the Oakland Athletics.

After being released by the Angels on November 16, 1993,[5] he signed a contract with the Yokohama BayStars that same month.[8] After a year, he came back to the minor leagues, and played for the Colorado Springs Sky Sox in the Colorado Rockies farm system in 1995. In 59 games, he went 4–10 with a 4.70 ERA.[2] He spent the next two seasons with the Buffalo Bisons of the Cleveland Indians farm system, where he pitched 98 games in two seasons and had an ERA below three.[2] Scott played for three minor league teams in 1999, and then spent the 2000 season with the Clearwater Phillies of the Philadelphia Phillies farm system, where he played in four games, as well as with three other farm teams. After pitching in 14 games with an ERA over 10 for the Tucson Sidewinders, the AAA affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks, he retired.[2]

He was a pitching coach for the Modesto Nuts, a minor league team for the Rockies. Scott is now with the Tulsa Drillers, the Double A affiliate of the Colorado Rockies.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Garcia, Irene (April 23, 1987). "Young Lion Pitcher Gives Coach Snow a Warm Glow". Los Angeles Times. p. 15. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Darryl Scott". The Baseball Cube. Archived from the original on 2009-07-19. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  3. ^ Drooz, Alan (April 29, 1988). "Loyola Lion Sluggers Hit Jackpot, Sweep Reno". Los Angeles Times. p. 12. 
  4. ^ a b Matthews, Stuart (June 10, 1990). "Is Surico Down to His Last Out?". Los Angeles Times. p. 18. 
  5. ^ a b "Darryl Scott Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  6. ^ a b c "Darryl Scott 1993 Pitching Gamelogs". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  7. ^ Nightengale, Bob (June 18, 1993). "Scott Told to Take Long Way Back". Los Angeles Times. p. 4. 
  8. ^ "November history". Japan Baseball Daily. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  9. ^ http://www.milb.com/milb/stats/stats.jsp?t=t_ros&cid=260&stn=true&sid=t260

External links[edit]