Datasoft

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Datasoft
IndustryVideo games
Productivity software
Founded1980; 41 years ago (1980)
FounderPat Ketchum
Headquarters,
United States

Datasoft, Inc. (also written as DataSoft and Data Soft) was a software developer and publisher for home computers founded in 1980 by Pat Ketchum and based out of Chatsworth, California.[citation needed] Datasoft primarily published video games, including home ports of arcade games, games based on licenses from movies and TV shows, and original games. Like competitor Synapse Software, the company also published other software: development tools, word processors, and utilities. Text Wizard, written by William Robinson and published by Datasoft when he was 16, was the basis for AtariWriter.[1] Datasoft initially targeted the Atari 8-bit family, Apple II, and TRS-80 Color Computer, then later the Commodore 64, IBM PC, Atari ST, and Amiga. Starting in 1983, a line of lower cost software was published under the name Gentry Software.[2]

Datasoft went into bankruptcy,[when?] and its name and assets were purchased by two Datasoft executives, Samuel L. Poole and Ted Hoffman.[citation needed] They renamed the company IntelliCreations and distributed Datasoft games until it closed.

Software[edit]

Games[edit]

1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988

Education[edit]

  • Bishop's Square / Maxwell's Demon (1982)[4]

Word processing[edit]

  • Text Wizard (1981)
  • Spell Wizard (1982)
  • Letter Wizard (1984)

Other software[edit]

  • Micro-Painter (1982)[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cohen, Frank (June 1987). "The Making of AtariWriter Plus". ANALOG Computing (55): 9–10.
  2. ^ "New Products". ANALOG Computing (13): 17. September 1983.
  3. ^ "Gunslinger". Atari Mania.
  4. ^ "Bishop's Square / Maxwell's Demon". Atari Mania.
  5. ^ "Micropainter". Atari Mania.

External links[edit]