Daurama

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Daurama II
Kabaras of Daura
Reign ???? - 900's Circa
Coronation ????
Predecessors Kabara Hamata
Successor Office Dissolved
Born ????
Tsohon Birni, Katsina, Northern Nigeria
Died ????
Daura, Northern Nigeria
Burial Birni Ta Kusheyi
House Banu Habe
Father ????
Mother Hamata
Religion Hausa Animist

Daurama or Magajiya Daurama (c. 9th century) was a ruler of the Hausa Nation, as the Last Kabara of Daura she presided over the upheaval that saw a transference of power from the matriarchal royal system of the Hausa people. oral traditions remember her as the founding "queen grandmother" of the Hausa empire states in northern Niger and Nigeria.[1] The story of Magajiva Daurama is partially told in the legend of Bayajidda.

Magajiva Daurama ruled a state known as Daura, after a town with the same name. The town of Daura is today an emirate in Katsina State, Nigeria. Tsohon Birni was the original capital of the state; Daurama moved the capital to the town of Daura, which is named after her.[2]

According to legend, a line of ruling queens was descended from Magajiva Daurama, in a lineage known as the Habe Queens. Oral stories record them as Kurfuru, Shata, Gino, Walzama, Shawata, Daura, Batatume, Yanbamu, Innagari, Gamata, Sandamata, Jamata, Zama, Yakumo, Yukuna, Gizirgizir, and Hamata.[3] The senior princess in the Daura emir's family is still known today by the title Magajiva.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jackson, Guida M. (2009). Women Leaders of Africa, Asia, Middle East, and Pacific. Xlibris. p. 52. ISBN 9781441558435. [self-published source]
  2. ^ Odiaua, Ishanlosa (2011). "Earth Building Culture in Daura, Nigeria". Terra 2008: Actes de la 10ème Conférence Internationale Sur L'étude Et la Conservation Du Patrimoine Bâti en Terre, Bamako, Mali, 1-5 Février 2008. Getty Publications. p. 120. ISBN 9781606060438. 
  3. ^ Jackson, Guida M. (2009). Women Leaders of Africa, Asia, Middle East, and Pacific. Xlibris. p. 52. ISBN 9781441558435. [self-published source]
  4. ^ Jackson, Guida M. (2009). Women Leaders of Africa, Asia, Middle East, and Pacific. Xlibris. p. 52. ISBN 9781441558435.