Davallia canariensis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Davallia canariensis
Davallia canariensis 1 ies.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Division: Polypodiophyta
Class: Polypodiopsida
Order: Polypodiales
Suborder: Polypodiineae
Family: Davalliaceae
Genus: Davallia
Species:
D. canariensis
Binomial name
Davallia canariensis

Davallia canariensis, the hare's-foot fern,[2] is a species of fern in the family Davalliaceae. It is endemic to Macaronesia and the Iberian Peninsula. It grows well in a sunny atmosphere and amongst rocks.

Description[edit]

Davallia canariensis is a spreading, deciduous fern with thick, scaly rhizomes and broad, finely-divided fronds, it grows up to 50 cm (20 in) tall and 100 cm (39 in) broad.[3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

Davallia canariensis is found on the western Mediterranean Basin, from Cape Verde, the Canary Islands and Madeira to Morocco and the western Iberian Peninsula (western Portugal and northwest and southwest Spain). It grows on tree trunks and branches, mossy siliceous rocks in cool and humid places with oceanic influences, from sea-level to 600 m (2,000 ft) in altitude.[4][3] The Latin specific epithet canariensis means "from the Canary Islands".[5]

As it is only hardy down to 5 °C (41 °F), in temperate climates it must be grown under glass as a houseplant. However, it may be placed outside in a sheltered spot during the summer months. It has an Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society.[3][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Christenhusz, M., Bento Elias, R., Dyer, R., Ivanenko, Y., Rouhan, G., Rumsey, F. & Väre, H. (2017). "Davallia canariensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2017: e.T78736780A85427101. Retrieved 17 March 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ BSBI List 2007 (xls). Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-06-26. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  3. ^ a b c "Davallia canariensis". www.rhs.org.uk (RHS). Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  4. ^ "D. canariensis" (PDF). Flora Iberica. Retrieved 17 March 2021.
  5. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for Gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. ISBN 978-1845337315.
  6. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 29. Retrieved 6 February 2018.

External links[edit]

  • American Horticultural Society Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers (2011), ISBN 978-0756675080
  • John Garrett, James William Helenus Trail (1901) The illustrated dictionary of gardening: Volume 1