Dave Dephoff

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Dave Dephoff
Personal information
Birth name David Dephoff
Born (1928-04-06)6 April 1928
Died 14 November 2014(2014-11-14) (aged 86)
Rotorua, New Zealand
Spouse(s) Pauline Jean Coombes[1][2]
Sport
Country New Zealand
Sport Athletics
Achievements and titles
National finals Long jump, 1st (1948, 52, 53)
Decathlon, 1st (1949, 50, 51)

David Dephoff (6 April 1928 – 14 November 2014) was a New Zealand long jumper and decathlete, who won the bronze medal in the men's long jump at the 1950 British Empire Games in Auckland.

National championships[edit]

Representing Canterbury, Dephoff won the under-19 long jump at the New Zealand amateur athletics championships in 1946 and 1947, with distances of 21 ft 10 18 in (6.66 m) and 21 ft 10 in (6.65 m), respectively. He then won the national men's long jump title in 1948, 1952 and 1953, with a best distance of 23 ft 1 in (7.04 m) at the 1952 championships.[3]

At the 1949 national athletics championships, Dephoff won the inaugural decathlon title, with a total of 5446 points. He went on to defend his title in 1950 (5358 points) and 1951 (5919 points).[3]

British Empire Games[edit]

At the 1950 British Empire Games held in Auckland, Dephoff won the bronze medal in the men's long jump, with a distance of 23 ft 3 in (7.09 m), behind Neville Price of South Africa who recorded a distance of 24 ft 1 in (7.34 m), and Bevin Hough of New Zealand whose best jump was 23 ft 7 38 in (7.20 m).[4]

Death[edit]

Dephoff died at Rotorua on 14 November 2014.[1][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "David Dephoff death notice". New Zealand Herald. 17 November 2014. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  2. ^ "Pauline Dephoff death notice". New Zealand Herald. 10 August 2017. Retrieved 12 August 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Hollings, Stephen (January 2015). "National champions 1887–2014" (PDF). Athletics New Zealand. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  4. ^ "Empire Games results". The West Australian. 8 February 1950. p. 16. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  5. ^ "Annual report 2014/15" (PDF). Athletics New Zealand. p. 4. Retrieved 11 April 2016.