Dave Glaser

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Ernest Derek 'Dave' Glaser
Nickname(s) Dave
Born 20 April 1921
Died 2001
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  Royal Air Force
Years of service 1939–1953
Rank Squadron Leader
Commands held No. 234 Squadron RAF
No. 548 Squadron RAF
No. 549 Squadron RAF
No. 64 Squadron RAF
Battles/wars

Second World War

Awards Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Efficiency Award, Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

Squadron Leader Ernest Derek 'Dave' Glaser DFC AE (20 April 1921 – 2001) was a British Royal Air Force officer of the Battle of Britain, and later a notable test pilot.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Glaser was the son of a former Royal Flying Corps officer and brought up in Hampshire. He was educated at Lancing House and Bloxham School, before being accepted for flying training in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve in April 1939.[3]

World War II[edit]

In 1940, Glaser was attached to No. 65 Squadron RAF, where he flew Supermarine Spitfires alongside Jeffrey Quill and Franciszek Gruszka in the Battle of Britain.[4] His plane became known for its nose art, representing The Laughing Cavalier. Glaser was promoted to Flight Lieutenant and in July 1940 transferred to No. 234 Squadron RAF as a flight commander.[5] It was while serving with No. 234 that he was mistakenly shot down on 13 July 1940 by a Royal Navy warship off the English south coast.[6] He was promoted to Pilot Officer in 1941.[7]

He became temporary commander of the squadron in October. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in August 1942.[8] In 1943, Glaser was posted to Australia to form and command No. 548 Squadron RAF, a Spitfire squadron stationed at Darwin, Northern Territory. In the New Year of 1945 he received command of No. 549 Squadron RAF, a Spitfire squadron similarly charged with defending Darwin against Japanese air attack.[9] In 1946 he was awarded the Air Efficiency Award.

Test pilot[edit]

After two years he returned home, was granted a permanent commission and posted to Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire. There he was flight commander of No. 64 Squadron RAF, a half-strength Hornet fighter squadron.[10]

In 1949 Glaser passed the Empire Test Pilots' School and became a test pilot at the Royal Aircraft Establishment. He became a test pilot with Vickers Armstrong in 1952, and was involved in testing and developing planes such as the Vickers Varsity, Vickers Viscount and the Vickers Valiant. Glaser was also involved in testing the BAC One-Eleven.[11][12] In 1979 he became flight operations manager and test pilot instructor of Rombac in Romania.[13] In 1983 he retired from British Aerospace and worked as a successful aviation consultant. He had been awarded the military Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air in 1953, and was rewarded the commendation for civil test flying in 1968.[14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Squadron Leader Dave Glaser". The Telegraph. London. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 8 January 2015. 
  2. ^ Dave Glaser profile
  3. ^ "Squadron Leader Dave Glaser". The Telegraph. London. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 8 January 2015. 
  4. ^ BBC – WW2 People's War, Sgt Pilot Harold Orchard RAF – Part 4 http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/17/a6812417.shtml (Accessed 8 January 2015)
  5. ^ Peter Brown, '6 October', RAF Southend (The History Press, 1 June 2012)
  6. ^ "Squadron Leader Dave Glaser". The Telegraph. London. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 8 January 2015. 
  7. ^ "No. 35228". The London Gazette. 25 July 1941. p. 4282. 
  8. ^ "No. 35678". The London Gazette (Supplement). 21 August 1942. p. 3709. 
  9. ^ Andrew Thomas, Spitfire Aces of Burma and the Pacific (Osprey Publishing, 2009), 93.
  10. ^ "Squadron Leader Dave Glaser". The Telegraph. London. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 8 January 2015. 
  11. ^ "Squadron Leader Dave Glaser". The Telegraph. London. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 8 January 2015. 
  12. ^ Stephen Skinner, BAC One-Eleven: The Whole Story (The History Press, 31 January 2013)
  13. ^ "Squadron Leader Dave Glaser". The Telegraph. London. 16 July 2001. Retrieved 8 January 2015. 
  14. ^ "No. 39863". The London Gazette (Supplement). 26 May 1953. p. 2990. 
  15. ^ "No. 44600". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 May 1968. p. 6331.